Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

cutting steel

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • cutting steel

    ok, i am a novice weldor ( really raw beginner) and i have been buying my project steel from a supplier and having it cut to size, however that is getting too expensive for my budget. my question is , aside from a cutting torch, what is the best method for making smooth straight cuts in 1/8" and 1/4" wall thickness angle and tubular steel? i am on a very limited budget so a big bandsaw is out of the question and a hand hacksaw is way too slow and laborious. what else is out there that can cut this stuff fast and cheaply?

  • #2
    I bought this bandsaw a couple of months ago, it works well for the money. Cuts everything I have thrown at it. $169.00, shipping free. They sell blades for 2 bucks each. Only ruined one so far, my fault.

    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=37151
    It's not an optical illusion...it just looks like one

    Comment


    • #3
      When el cheapo china band saw is too expensive not much is left.
      El cheapo china abrasive cutoff saw.
      Sawzall resipicating saw but not great for a lot of steel.

      Abrasive blade in circular saw.
      Carbide blade in circular saw works for aluminum.

      Buy used gas cutting rig then use propane and O2.

      Make your own motorized hacksaw. Probably plans on internet or http://www.lindsaybks.com/dgjp/djgbk/index.html

      Comment


      • #4
        Angle grinders

        My angle grinder 4.5 inch gets alot of use, whether its cutting, grinding or wire brushing. Great tool to have. I just purchased 2 more from Homier, its a gypsy tool show that comes around a couple times a year. $6.00 each with a grinding wheel. Online they sell for 10 bucks.

        http://www.homier.com/default.asp

        Harborfreight also has angle grinders for 10-12 bucks. All of mine have the metal gear box with a plastic motor housing. Haven't burned out one yet.
        It's not an optical illusion...it just looks like one

        Comment


        • #5
          hey Al, I bought one of those grinders from Homier also, mine must have been on sale ... it was only $4.99 i keep a flapper disc on it and a grinding disc on my better Craftsman grinder. the Homier grinder just bogs down to much under load.

          - jack

          Comment


          • #6
            http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=44829 is a cheap but effective machine.
            Trent
            Building my wife's fortune - one machine at a time!
            Bobcat 250, MM210 w/3545 spoolgun, HH135, Miller Dialarc 250 AC/DC w/HF251, Red AC/DC tombstone, Victor SRII

            Comment


            • #7
              Steel cutting carbide blade in a standard 7-1/4" circular saw.

              I think the going rate for the blades is about $50 each, but I snagged a pair on ebay for $9 from some guy who had bought up a trade show booth. I already tried, he did not have any more. These came from China ("Goltool" brand so they might show up in Harbor Freigth or Northen some day.

              A British company (Evolution?) makes a special circular saw and blade, but pricey. They claim several hundred cuts until it needs to be sharpened. (Not sure I know what that means: big cuts? thin vs thick?). I am using my stand B&D saw motor (a much older model with all metal case). Have not seen any other steel cutting carbides in Home Depot, OSH, etc.

              I hold the saw and pull the trigger with my right hand, guide with the with left hand covered in welding glove to avoid the hot chips. Also wear eye protection and ear muffs. It actually makes chips and not grindings so I think it is still working.

              Hope this helps,
              Bob

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: cutting steel

                Originally posted by haybine
                ok, i am a novice weldor ( really raw beginner) and i have been buying my project steel from a supplier and having it cut to size, however that is getting too expensive for my budget. my question is , aside from a cutting torch, what is the best method for making smooth straight cuts in 1/8" and 1/4" wall thickness angle and tubular steel? i am on a very limited budget so a big bandsaw is out of the question and a hand hacksaw is way too slow and laborious. what else is out there that can cut this stuff fast and cheaply?
                Haybine

                A $170 - $200 4" X 6" horizontal/vertical metal cutting bandsaw in my opinion is the cheapest machine available that will produce your highest quality cut. If the machine is set up and used properly they are capable of producing cuts that are extremely accurate.
                MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
                Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


                PM 180C



                HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Bob

                  A British company (Evolution?) makes a special circular saw and blade, but pricey. They claim several hundred cuts until it needs to be sharpened. (Not sure I know what that means: big cuts? thin vs thick?). I am using my stand B&D saw motor (a much older model with all metal case). Have not seen any other steel cutting carbides in Home Depot, OSH, etc.

                  Hope this helps,
                  Bob
                  I have an Evolution 180 metal cutting circular saw...the unique thing about it, it it has a chip collector built right into the saw housing. No hot chips all over you! I love it. It will cut 1/4" like butter and leave no burr. It'll zip through Unistrut like it wasn't even there! I very seldom cut with my torch anymore.

                  Mike Sherman has the Evolution 230, and has said great things about it, too. However they are pricey. $500 for the 180. Don't know about the 230.

                  The other cutter I use is a .040" cuttoff wheel in my 5" right angle grinder. very accurate. The 5" grinder is twice as powerful as the 4 1/2" grinder. They turn at 11,000RPM which make the cutoff wheels real stiff, and cut fast.
                  Here are the two grinders I use, the one in the foreground has the cuttoff wheel on it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have the band saw from Harbor Freight, works pretty well, just do not try to push it. makes a nice cut,

                    Came in VERY handy when I made new spring perches and mounts for a truck I was building

                    Kevin

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have used a good (Milwaukee) sawzall to cut a lot of tubing and angle up to about 2x2" tube with 1/4" wall to build brackets, etc for off road vehicles.Its slow and noisy but has done the job. Also have a $200 Milwaukee chop saw that works decent. The cutting torch is my least favorite. Bought a plasma cutter a while back and that thing is the best thing since air was invented. I'm a tool junkie and the $1500 for the plasma cutter had no business case. I just wanted it. it is great for for cutting, especially brackets from angle or plate. Start saving your money If I had a limited budget I'd go for the sawzall (the Milwaukee for about $180) since you can do all kinds of other cutting with it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I think if I was just going to buy one saw I'd buy a portaband. Alot you can do with it. somethings you can't do so well with it just like everything, it has it's tradeoffs ...

                        - jack

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          If I only had one thing to cut steel, it would be a 6" Matabo (which is a electric grinder) with a waffer wheel (1/16" thick grinding wheel), you can cut sheet metal, to the heaviest I-beams, with no clean up. They are kind of expensive, about $220, I picked one up at a pawn shop for $70. Maybe try e-bay, call around, and, you can also use it with regular grinding wheels, or wire wheels, to clean up welds etc.
                          Of coarse a plasma would be great, but, lots of cash!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Hey Russel,

                            out of curiosity, where is Bessemer City NC, in relation to Raleigh?

                            never heard of it before .

                            Just wondering.

                            Kevin

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              russell,

                              I will second RockyD praise of the carbide steel cutting blade for the circular saw. My max cut so far is 2x2x1/4 angle ... and it just went right through it.

                              Below is one seller of the "evolution 180" I found with a search on "evolution saw". 180mm is about 7.2".

                              http://www.oceanmachinery.com/evolution_saw.htm

                              Personally, I have two such blades for my 7 1/8 standard circular saw. I suit up with welding glove, eye and ear protection. That is a bit of a bother, but totally necessary. Have not seen a US maker of this type of blade, but seems like there sould be one.

                              Bob

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X