Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

New Tig welder, to me anyway. Now what?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • New Tig welder, to me anyway. Now what?

    I just got a new, to me, Lincoln 175 squarewave. Picked up a water cooler, CKS water cooled torch, Argon bottle, and flow regulator from the welding supply store. Got some 1/8" by 1.5" by ~7" HR shear droppings from the local fab shop.

    Now that it is all together, I am stareing at it dumb-founded. I can gas weld/braze fairly well as long as it is in the flat position. I assume tig is not too much different. I figured I start with some lap, butt, corner, and fillet welds and learn as I go. Any pointers? How about a flow rate and current to get started. Thx's, FAB.

  • #2
    Re: New Tig welder, to me anyway. Now what?

    Originally posted by Fred Bryant
    I just got a new, to me, Lincoln 175 squarewave. Picked up a water cooler, CKS water cooled torch, Argon bottle, and flow regulator from the welding supply store. Got some 1/8" by 1.5" by ~7" HR shear droppings from the local fab shop.

    Now that it is all together, I am stareing at it dumb-founded. I can gas weld/braze fairly well as long as it is in the flat position. I assume tig is not too much different. I figured I start with some lap, butt, corner, and fillet welds and learn as I go. Any pointers? How about a flow rate and current to get started. Thx's, FAB.
    Fred

    First thing you need is some reference material. a cheap book to get you started is available at Millers website: http://www.millerwelds.com . You can find it in the training/education section of the site.

    Before you start practicing on the Hot roll material remove the mill scale.

    The average flow rate is between 15 and 20 CFH.

    Im assuming this HR material is mild steel. For mild steel I use either ER 70S-2 or ER70S-6 filler rod. The ER70S-2 is my first choice because it has the highest number of de-oxidizers. For 1/8" material I use 1/16" and 3/32" diameter filler rods.

    For T joints on 1/8" mild steel set the machine at about 90 - 110 amps. This setting should allow you to use most of the travel on your foot pedal.

    Sorry, Im a little tired right now, so Im having some difficulty remembering the settings that I use for the other joints. Which is bizaree, since I use them almost everyday. If they come to me later, I will post them for you.
    Last edited by Dan; 10-14-2002, 11:45 AM.
    MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
    Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


    PM 180C



    HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

    Comment


    • #3
      Sample Welds

      Thankyou, Mr. Dan. The material you recommended is on order.

      Here are a couple of sample welds I did after a few minutes of practice. I do not seem to have the control that I do with a torch by playing the flame over the weld to control the heat, but that could be just a matter of practice. Using the foot control seems awkward, but then again practice.

      What is the best way to remove the mill scale, a 4 1/2" cup wire brush on a grinder? Also, I have the green tungson, but the gentlemen at the welding store indicate that I need to switch to a red tungson for mild steel.

      Thx's, FAB.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Sample Welds

        Originally posted by Fred Bryant
        Thankyou, Mr. Dan. The material you recommended is on order.

        Here are a couple of sample welds I did after a few minutes of practice. I do not seem to have the control that I do with a torch by playing the flame over the weld to control the heat, but that could be just a matter of practice. Using the foot control seems awkward, but then again practice.

        What is the best way to remove the mill scale, a 4 1/2" cup wire brush on a grinder? Also, I have the green tungson, but the gentlemen at the welding store indicate that I need to switch to a red tungson for mild steel.

        Thx's, FAB.
        MR. DAN ?

        Actually, I prefer Danny, but Dan is my legal name and quicker to type.

        To remove mill scale , I use a wire wheel, sanding disc, abrasive buffing pad, or bead blasting. For test coupons I just use a 60 grit sanding disc. It removes the mill scale quickly without doing very much damage to the base metal.

        2% thoriated tungsten (red) is a better choice for steel or stainless steel, then pure tungsten (green). Use the pure tungsten for aluminum.

        From what I can see of your picture it looks like you are focusing to much of the arc onto the top plate. Try changing the angle of your electrode and place more of the arc onto the bottom plate.

        Also, wait a little longer and let the puddle develop at the start of your weld.

        At the point when you get read to stop the arc slowly let up off the peddle and hold the torch in that spot until your post gas flow stops. By coming up off the peddle slowly you make it so that the end of your weld bead doesn t have a crater in it . A crater would be a stress point that could cause the weld to crack. Holding the torch over the end of the weld bead after you have released the peddle helps protect the weld while it cools.

        If you have any other questions I will try to answer them if I can.
        MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
        Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


        PM 180C



        HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Sample Welds

          Originally posted by Fred Bryant
          Thankyou, Mr. Dan. The material you recommended is on order.

          Here are a couple of sample welds I did after a few minutes of practice. I do not seem to have the control that I do with a torch by playing the flame over the weld to control the heat, but that could be just a matter of practice. Using the foot control seems awkward, but then again practice.

          What is the best way to remove the mill scale, a 4 1/2" cup wire brush on a grinder? Also, I have the green tungson, but the gentlemen at the welding store indicate that I need to switch to a red tungson for mild steel.

          Thx's, FAB.
          Not bad at all, Fred, for a first try. You'll find that the skills you learned in O/A welding will play a big part in TIG welding. Watch the holes on the crater...back off slowly at the end of the weld and make a circle as you back off the current.

          Comment

          Working...
          X