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  • What # lens?

    First of all I am new to this board. I am just starting touse a mig welder. I am mainly useing flux core. My problem is in seeing the arc. I would like to know what is the lowest shield # I can use without hurting my eyes?
    Thanks Bob T

  • #2
    Re: What # lens?

    Originally posted by Bob T
    First of all I am new to this board. I am just starting touse a mig welder. I am mainly useing flux core. My problem is in seeing the arc. I would like to know what is the lowest shield # I can use without hurting my eyes?
    Thanks Bob T
    I use a #9, but every one's eyes are different....you need it light enough to see the edges of the puddle...if you can't see with a # 10 then go to a #9...I have a co-worker that uses a #12 for light gauge heliarc! Eyes like a cat! (not normal)

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    • #3
      Re: What # lens?

      Originally posted by Bob T
      First of all I am new to this board. I am just starting touse a mig welder. I am mainly useing flux core. My problem is in seeing the arc. I would like to know what is the lowest shield # I can use without hurting my eyes?
      Thanks Bob T
      Hey BobT, what Rock said, go with what you like,.....but if you weld a lot, I would use the most protection and still be able to see what you are doing, you only get 1 set of peepers my friend.
      ROCK

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      • #4
        I am using a #9 now. I did not think of using a light. I already have one bad eye so I can not afford to hurt the other one. I have learned a lot already just looking at the other posts. Thanks.
        Bob T

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        • #5
          Bob,
          I found it very helpful to put a 600W halogen lamp real close to my work, even with a #10 shade you can see clearly what you need too.
          I have finally spent the money for an auto darkening helmet and it is very similar to using the lamp, but, without the hassle.

          Brent

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          • #6
            Re: What # lens?

            Originally posted by Bob T
            First of all I am new to this board. I am just starting touse a mig welder. I am mainly useing flux core. My problem is in seeing the arc. I would like to know what is the lowest shield # I can use without hurting my eyes?
            Thanks Bob T
            Bob,

            My uneducated theory is that as long as you are not seeing spots in front of your eyes after laying a bead then your lens is dark enough. All of the lenses will protect you from the UV radiation.
            Bill C
            "The more I learn about welding the more I find there is to learn..."

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            • #7
              Re: Re: What # lens?

              Originally posted by BillC


              Bob,

              My uneducated theory is that as long as you are not seeing spots in front of your eyes after laying a bead then your lens is dark enough. All of the lenses will protect you from the UV radiation.
              Right on, Bill. One other thing no one has mentioned yet, and that is to keep your lens clean...they have a tendency to get dirty, and you just keep looking through the scum, and this results in terrific eye strain. I forget to change cover plates all the time....don't be like me! Ya gotta be able to see what you're doin'!

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              • #8
                In your original post you say problem is seeing the arc. Only newbees look at the arc. Must look past arc at puddle leading and trailing edge. Beyond puddle only need to see a little bit where your going.
                An experenced weldor knows where to look and how to manipulate puddle by habit and shape of puddle.

                Welding is like walking on trail in fog use what you can see and don't worry about what you can't see. Just stay on trail.

                When gas welding you can see anything you want to look at clearly but must look at puddle to weld.

                Welding with time and practice becomes almost automatic action like walking.

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                • #9
                  Roger,
                  I like your "walk in the fog" analogy. That is exactly what it is like. The light is a good way to be able to see before you strike the arc. Also making a trail of punch marks can help you follow a line. If you make the marks strong enough, they create shadows from the arc and are very east to see. This works best across a flat surface where there is no corner or edge to follow like for repair of cracks.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Roger
                    In your original post you say problem is seeing the arc. Only newbees look at the arc. Must look past arc at puddle leading and trailing edge. Beyond puddle only need to see a little bit where your going.
                    An experenced weldor knows where to look and how to manipulate puddle by habit and shape of puddle.

                    Welding is like walking on trail in fog use what you can see and don't worry about what you can't see. Just stay on trail.

                    When gas welding you can see anything you want to look at clearly but must look at puddle to weld.

                    Welding with time and practice becomes almost automatic action like walking.
                    Great analogy, Roger! You are so right, I tend to forget the simple things, after 45 years of burnin' rod. That's why I like this forum...it reminds you where you've been.

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                    • #11
                      Oh yes........ this is definitely the forum for me. Keep churning out the knowledge guys! It all seems so obvious... once you have been told.
                      shaky

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                      • #12
                        Remember what setting you use for steel may be a bit different for Aluminum or Stainless. I find Aluminum is on the bright side. More current is needed.

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                        • #13
                          I LIKE A LIGHT SHADE LENS, BECAUSE I'M A very VISUAL WELDER, I NEED TO BE ABLE TO SEE WHAT IM DOING. DONT KNOW ABOUT ANYONE ELSE, BUT I GET SO CLOSE TO THE ARC, I SOMETIME MELT COVER LENSES ON LONG PASSES. AND DONT SAY IM A NEWIE I HAVE STARTED TO LEAN TOWARDS DARKER LENS'S LATELY BECAUSE I HAVE BEEN HAVING SPOT IN MY VISION AFTER AN HOUR OR SO OF LAYING BEADS. I'M A YOUNG GUY AND DONT WANT TO BE HALF BLIND AT 50, SO I USE A DARK LENS WHENEVER POSSIBLE, UNLESS I JUST CANT SEE WHAT I'M DOING.
                          ROCKY D, I KNOW WHAT YOU MEAN, CHANGING A COVER LENS CAN BE LIKE GETTING A SET OF GLASSES!

                          LOOK INTO A NEXGEN OR SPEEDGLAS, HELPS OUT ALOT TO HAVE A SHARP AUTO DIMMER WITH AJUSTABLE SHADE.

                          MATT

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