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AC vc DC arc welding question...

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  • #16
    well i would all have to say it depends on the type of joint you are welding but i personally prefer ac over dc+ just for the simple fact i can weld better with it but for 7018 which i have to use a lot at school i prefer for dc+ cuz the dc on the machines sucks yeah practice practice
    and i think that would make a big difference for me
    it is always better to be long than to too short.

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    • #17
      Joe, I would say we got some learnin to do if you find AC preferable to DC. Some of the finest equipment made for stick weld doesnt have AC on it anywhere. All the electrodes you are running will run better on DC, only one reason for the avg guy to run AC,,, if its all he has.
      Last edited by Sberry; 05-19-2007, 09:49 AM.
      http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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      • #18
        Keep the AC knob

        Howdy Howdy!

        One reason to keep the AC knob available, is IF you want to eventually tig weld aluminum. You can use the AC mode, with a tig torch, and a tig module. They can be had used for about 100$ sometimes. This would let you tig weld alluminum in AC mode for around 1/8" thick material +/-. That and arc blow are the two reasons I can come up with for keeping the AC knob.

        Even with Arc blow, you can re-position the ground clamp, or if you have two long seperate pieces welding a seem together, you can tack both ends, and re-move the "U" shape and create a "O" shape while you weld together. This more evenly distributes the "lines of magnetic flux" not to be confused with welding rod flux. Magnetic lines of flux are a theoretical way of defining how strong a magnetic field is in comparison to the surrounding magnetic influences. It reads like a topo map, again theoretical. There are no actuall lines. You can MAKE lines, with iron powder or filings, that magnetically match the lines of flux.

        When the steel you are welding on is shaped like a "U", you can imagine it with two strong poles, like a cartoon red "U" shaped magnet, that willie Coyote uses to get road runner. Bye closing the end together with a tack weld, you change the lines of flux, and remove Most of the polarization within the material as the DC current is applied, reducing arc blow bye roughly 90% or something similar.

        Keep the knob, just don't use it unless / untill you get a tig module or for arc blow control. That basic machine has hardly anything to go wrong with it. Good luck! Brian Lee Sparkeee28 soon to be dad... counting the hours,

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        • #19
          100mm wall thickness tubing

          I changed my post because it made my I.Q. appear to be the same as my shoe size. In real life my shoe size is much larger.

          Later,
          Last edited by Black Wolf; 05-20-2007, 11:12 PM. Reason: www.Imafriggindumbass.com

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          • #20
            Same thing. Same reason as above.

            Later,
            Last edited by Black Wolf; 05-20-2007, 11:13 PM. Reason: www.Imafriggindumbass.com

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            • #21
              I think he's talking about 4" ( ~ 100 mm) heavy gauge square tube, something with 5/32" walls ...
              Last edited by chevyman_de; 05-19-2007, 12:39 PM.
              Steffen

              If the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.

              Fronius Vario-Star 304 (Mig, 400v/3-phase, watercooled)
              Cemont SX 350S (Stick & DC Tig, 400v/3-phase inverter)
              Cemont SX 135 (Stick, 230v/single phase inverter)
              Cebora Plasma Sound 35PC (230v/single phase inverter)

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              • #22
                That makes a lot more sense. Sorry I misread the post.

                Send all relevant hatemail to my website www.Imafriggindumbass.com

                Later,

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Black Wolf View Post
                  Not really. What do you think why I had to edit my previous post? Regarding a 4" tube thick walled means 1/4" to 3/8" wall thickness to me.
                  The mentioning of the 4 mm walls slipped my mind while posting
                  Steffen

                  If the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.

                  Fronius Vario-Star 304 (Mig, 400v/3-phase, watercooled)
                  Cemont SX 350S (Stick & DC Tig, 400v/3-phase inverter)
                  Cemont SX 135 (Stick, 230v/single phase inverter)
                  Cebora Plasma Sound 35PC (230v/single phase inverter)

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    S'right fellas, the tubing is 4" or 100mm square, with a wall of about 4mm or maybe 1/4", didn't measur it.
                    I was told some time back that you can either vee the joint out by grinding both edges or if you're a real lazy b####std just leave the joint about 2mm apart and the weld will penetrate deep enough.
                    I'm a fitter and turner, retired now, and had to do welding when I was retrenched at 60.
                    The only guy who would offer me a job wanted a pensioner type to do a few hours a week to help out when the work piled up.
                    I started out doing 10 hrs a week and ended up doing five days at 4 hrs mornings only.
                    I normally can't stand welding, got too many sparks down my neck to like it, but doing it for real meant following the code of using the right gear all the time and big welders too.
                    One of the things I had a hand in building was a submerged arc set-up to weld large steel wheels for the rock wool insulation industry.
                    The wheels are used to throw molten iron ore mix down a tunnel to make a product resembling fibre glass wool but made from molten iron and rock.
                    The wheels get chewed up with the lava like mix and the guy I worked for has a contract to rebuild them.
                    The submerged arc uses stainless steel mig wire uncoated and a loose flux mix that pours onto the job as it rotates and shields the arc.
                    The build up can be as much as 50mm deep and 200mm wide.
                    I retired permanently at 64 and now we meet at the factory for tea and biscuits quite regularly and talk weld talk and machine design.
                    Not being a machinist he was getting a lot of bum steers from various quarters and this led to a lot of headaches for him.
                    He bought my Bridgeport mill when I bought an Ajax Turret mill on Ebay a month back, and now he's deep in the joys of learning to work a mill, with a bit of tuition from me, and being able to make things.
                    Ian.

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                    • #25
                      Oh yeah, you'll fit in fine around here!

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                      • #26
                        One of the things I had a hand in building was a submerged arc set-up to weld large steel wheels for the rock wool insulation industry.
                        Wow, and I haven't seen or heard of rock wool since I was a kid.

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                        • #27
                          Hi Sandy, the rockwool industry is like the glassfibre insulation industry, similar materials, one is glass the other is a combination of iron ore, rock and coke, melted in a cupola and blown down a tunnel to create the wool.
                          I'm not sure about the actual properties of either, apart from being inert fireproof insulating materials.
                          Ian.

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                          • #28
                            about rock wool

                            Howdy Howdy!

                            You can keep that rock wool as far from me as possible! :P As an electrician, I have worked in many an attic with the stuff. It's 10 times worse then fiber glass. The only good thing, is when you get 100 slivers of it, you can see 90% of them. Fiberglass is usually too fine and translucent to see. Rock wool doesn't hold together as well, it seperates alot more. Usually it is not nearly as dense, and the insulation factor is way lower. That is with the rock wool I see here. Your may be better. It was my understanding that in the US, most rock wool was actuall slag bi-product waste from the steel industry, and a way to spread contaminates out legally over a wide area. Like they do with wast chemicals that get used for plant fertilizers. The stuff is just plain nasty.

                            The best stuff I have seen, for batting, is the white poly fill. It's like the stuff in sleeping bags, and won't maintain a flame. It can catch on fire, but won't maintain it unless there is something else on fire near bye. The other, is the newer fiberglass that is white also. They no longer put formaldihide in it, as it leaches into the homes air. That stuff is great to work with! Your little glass cuts don't sting. Still nead a mask. The other stuff I really like is the whole house spray foam made from fish oil. It's like the can of expanding foam, but sprayed on bye a sub contractor. It has the best insulation rating due to it's 100% fill of an area. The stuff is awesome. Fishing wire through it after the fact is a major pain though. Almost have to remove sheet rock.

                            Thanks for the interesting post! Brian Lee Sparkeee28

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