Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

alum welding

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • alum welding

    what do i need to weld light aluminum, like beer cans

  • #2
    $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ make it easiest.
    http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

    Comment


    • #3
      Thicker beer cans would be your best bet

      Lots of patience would be your second best bet.
      Lincoln SP175
      Craftsman O/A setup
      TA185
      HT30 plasma
      HF 6x4 bandsaw
      Cadillac 1440 lathe
      Tree 2UVR mill
      HF tube roller
      Bead roller
      Pro-Tools 105 bender

      Comment


      • #4
        I suppose if you had a million dollar machine it would be possible, beer cans are like .002 thousands thick. Good luck. You might want to try super glue ...Bob
        Bob Wright, Grandson of Tee Nee Boat Trailer Founder
        Metal Master Fab
        Salem, Ohio
        Birthplace of the Silver & Deming Drill
        http://www.ceilingtrains.com/
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sawking/
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbend10k/

        Comment


        • #5
          there's a linde plasma needle arc welder for sale on ebay that might work, hehehehehe. otherwise some of the little ac/dc inverters can do it with the pulsing cranked way up. good luck and dont drink too much coffee when you do it [weld]!
          chip

          Comment


          • #6
            It's done with TIG, but not by everyone! Welding aluminum beer cans is one tricky thing. I lnow I'm not going to be trying it anytime soon!

            Hank
            ...from the Gadget Garage
            MM 210 w/3035, BWE
            HH 210 w/DP 3035
            TA185TSW
            Victor O/A "J" series, SuperRange
            Avatar courtesy of Bob Sigmon...

            Comment


            • #7
              I used to weld them as a form of practice and for bragging rights. I used 1/16" 2% thoriated tungsten and 1/16" 4043 wire. You can't linger for long and you need to weld on your wire and dab quick and clean. You'll want to poke a small hole in the bottom of oner of the cans if you weld them butt to butt so it can vent.
              Two turn tables and a microphone.

              Comment


              • #8
                My uncle does it all the time. He's got an old Miller transformer TIG welder Vintage Mid 70's. I'm not sure what model, but I know it is big and heavy and stands about 5 feet tall. But the guy is a welding genius and a skilled craftsman. The best that I have ever known and he makes it look easy. It's not.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Striker View Post
                  My uncle does it all the time. He's got an old Miller transformer TIG welder Vintage Mid 70's. I'm not sure what model, but I know it is big and heavy and stands about 5 feet tall. But the guy is a welding genius and a skilled craftsman. The best that I have ever known and he makes it look easy. It's not.
                  my machine is an old miller 250 a-c d-c transformer w/ a lincoln HF unit, i can weld plate ok , but i was looking to weld thinner stuff

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    i've heard of someone crimping an electrode don't know if copper tungsten or what in a mig tip then welding a pop can w/ no filler metal like tig not sure polarity settings etc its been a few years

                    surff

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I am with Sberry, lots of money.
                      We have a tig welder @ work that works from .1 to 100 amps. Spent 10.5k just for the box.
                      CNC Plasma cutter / Plasma CAM system
                      Hyperthem Powermax 1000
                      Hobart TIG Mate
                      Hobart Ironman 250 MIG
                      And you got to have a fridge!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by john ret bm View Post
                        my machine is an old miller 250 a-c d-c transformer w/ a lincoln HF unit, i can weld plate ok , but i was looking to weld thinner stuff
                        John, I have a Miller Dial-Arc 250HF and routinely weld thin aluminum. Machine is early 80's model. Welding two beer cans together (base to base) is not TOO dificult with that machine. Cutting a beer can in half and welding it back together? Hmmm....that is much more difficult if not bordering on impossible. I read a "challenge" post on a forum last fall about doing just that. The post was a year or so old at the time and so far no one had posted pics of them doing that sucsessfully. I tried it and you just cant' adjust the machine low enough.
                        Frankly, after a few dozen attempts, I gave up.
                        I figure if a brewer calls with a number of beer cans to repair I'll worry about it then.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          What would I need? A lot more skill, for one thing.

                          I know a few people that specialize in material 0.005" thick, but it is a real specialty. Funny thing is they don't tend to use real exotic equipment. Synchrowave, Dynasty, and Aerowave are the machines in one of the shops. Key thing, from what I'm told, is how stable the machine is at the low end.

                          To cut one and reweld together, I'd probably start with a copper backer, set the machine to about 3 to 5A, and run a series of tacks rather than try a continuous bead.
                          I may not be good looking, but I make up for it with my dazzling lack of personality

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by enlpck View Post
                            What would I need? A lot more skill, for one thing.

                            I know a few people that specialize in material 0.005" thick, but it is a real specialty. Funny thing is they don't tend to use real exotic equipment. Synchrowave, Dynasty, and Aerowave are the machines in one of the shops. Key thing, from what I'm told, is how stable the machine is at the low end.

                            To cut one and reweld together, I'd probably start with a copper backer, set the machine to about 3 to 5A, and run a series of tacks rather than try a continuous bead.
                            Low end stability was definately a problem. All I has was 1/16" 2% and pure tungsten and 1/16" 4043 filler. Even grinding the point to a needle and using the smallest cups and gas lens was tough. Basically I was simultaniously heating the filler and the can at the same time trying to let the filler act as a bit of a heat sink. About the longest bead I could run before "disaster" was maybe 1/2".

                            I'm sure that one of the machines you listed would work much better at low end. especially if you were able to dial back the Freq.

                            BTW, the "Challenge" was a beer can....kind of tough to get a copper backing bar inside the opening. Hmmm...but then again they do build ships in bottles.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Welding Beer Cans is easy with the right equipment

                              Weld logic makes some very good micro tig machines. I used them to weld .002" thick titanium once. They would be great for aluminum - only a few amps is all it would take. They were automated of course. Is that cheating? What do you expect from a welding engineer! I haven't struck a non automated arc for years now!

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X