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  • help with O/A bevel cuts

    My class was sappose to be doing stick now, but the supply order that included the electrodes hasn't shown up. So, the instructor has decided to show us a few other things with o/a cutting torch.

    After doing soooo many straight cuts and circules, doing some gouging was nice too. But when it came time to do some 45 degree angle bevel, we ran into some problems. The instructors took some agle iron and layed that across our practice steel, creating a the correct angle, only problem is nobody has large enough clamps to clamp the angle iron down so it moves as you slide the torch head along it.

    Now I've done ALOT of wood working am use to making jigs to make various cuts, so i got to thinking, there's gotta be some kind of jig we could make to make these angle cuts. I keep visioning some kinda jig using angle iron welded far enough apart so the tip protrudes out the bottom of a channel and the nut slides along the sides of the angle iron as a guide....But it'd have to be open ended. Coulldn't have any braces over the top, wouldn't be able to hold the torch then.... hhmmmm


    Jaxom
    Lincoln 3200 (175?)

  • #2
    Oh yeah, there are lots of ways to make jigs for burning. Over the years I’ve seen some really great ones. Let your imagination run wild ! I personally carried one of these for years. Great for working out of position!
    Dynasty 300 DX Tig Runner

    Survey says!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Blue is prettier than purple or yeller

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    • #3
      One of my guys uses a guide but I almost never use one with an OA.
      http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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      • #4
        Not all of us are as good with a torch as Cary! Some of us village idiots need help.

        You can buy these for pennies on the dollar now a days. I paid $50.00 for this one. They come in real handy for making long cuts, straight or bevel.
        Dynasty 300 DX Tig Runner

        Survey says!!!!!!!!!!!!

        Blue is prettier than purple or yeller

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        • #5
          I agree. If I needed it I would have one too. My friend invented one a hand operated crank version called the Steel Beaver that was nice too or for portable. I dont have any of it although I use a ruler for cutting sheets with a plasma. I dont do enough of it to make the extra tools worthwhile or I get a shear or brake at the steel yard. I built hundreds of benches for a factory that way. I cut 2, 3 plates into pieces, gang saw tubing and angles put it on pallets and in my pickup, run it home and assemble. I had an exact cut list everyday when I went in, cut tubes and angles 10 at a time, I couldnt run it thru my own ironworker if I had one for free for that. The guys in the shop liked me, I sometimes have 2 of their machines going, shear and saw, I cut a hundred pieces in half an hr, even BS with the guys, done in 45 minutes. Run 3 or 4 flat bars at a time thru the shear, they were charging 35 an hr,,, ha a bargain I had all the layout done when I got there, I would stand right there and sequence it thru the shear. I really get my moneys worth on that deal.
          http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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          • #6
            One thing about hand cutting is that when I get off the line I get back on imediately, I dont gradually compensate. If you steer like you do a car then you are actually making minor corrections, you dont have to be super steady you keep steering back to the line. If you want an accurate cut you need a good line. Most of the worlds hand fab doesnt need to be that good or accurate but in the field you could come up with anything and all this is important where the need to cut identical work proffeceintly, or fitup is critical, or doing work where its not practical to carry a grinder. I work on a calcium chloride plant several times, dirty filthy extremely rusted and not a grinder in sight. All torch and welder.
            http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Jaxom View Post
              After doing soooo many straight cuts and circules, doing some gouging was nice too. But when it came time to do some 45 degree angle bevel, we ran into some problems. The instructors took some agle iron and layed that across our practice steel, creating a the correct angle, only problem is nobody has large enough clamps to clamp the angle iron down so it moves as you slide the torch head along it.



              Jaxom
              I am like Cary, don't need a guide after all these years. However.....since you are cutting steel and using a steel (I presume) angle as your guide........you could easily......tack the angle to your plate that you are beveling One spot at each end should suffice and easily removed after you make the cut.

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              • #8
                Great minds think alike!!

                Originally posted by Pile Buck View Post
                Not all of us are as good with a torch as Cary! Some of us village idiots need help.

                You can buy these for pennies on the dollar now a days. I paid $50.00 for this one. They come in real handy for making long cuts, straight or bevel.
                I was thinking the exact same thing just before I opened your pictures! I just finished up my OA cutting test at school and we had to do a 22 1/2" bevel cut on one long side with the track torch. I was lucky to be within a few degrees of 90 degrees when I did my freehand cuts on the other sides, but they sure aren't as smooth as the track torch!

                Dave

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                • #9
                  Cary

                  The company I worked for had 5-owners. All but one were extremely educated, (engineers). # 2 owner was right out of the trades. When ever I was unfortunate enough to work for # 5, which meant the state of California. He had this very bad habit of wanting us to prove to him we needed anything. The ultimate micro-manager. He was always having us do mini-studies / cost analyses. This annoying task ranged form wanting to hire more people, change directions from the estimate, to buying high dollar tools. Only thing I got out of this was, I learned how to waste valuable time. But just maybe this skill will help you here.

                  We need to evaluate the cost of your labor, gas, wear and tear on your truck, lack of production of yourself, and those that work for you, while your off running to town, to have this stuff cut. The time you spend bull sheeting with the guy at the shear, which slows him down, and maybe even distracts him just enough that he might get hurt. Well the list can go on and on, I’m sure you get my point.

                  See, I would think a phone call to the steel supplier explaining the cut sheet you just faxed him would do the same thing. But that would cut into what we used to call “windshield time”!
                  Like they say there’s more than one way to skin a cat.
                  Dynasty 300 DX Tig Runner

                  Survey says!!!!!!!!!!!!

                  Blue is prettier than purple or yeller

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                  • #10
                    I perfected this as long as it lasted. I couldnt do it any cheaper and faster and as acurate. I tried the drawing and quote method but the time was key and I made about 150 an hr for that little chore. I agree, if it was to go on forever it would have been a different story, I also got just in time delevery with the least amount of stock and cutting for pennies on the dollar. I was the contractor. I bought a new welding machine and a gas bottle for that job and some gloves and saftey glasses. I had a fire and was in a makeshift shop at the time even. I couldnt do it any faster, cheaper or make any more money than I did. I designed the benches in somewhat modular fashion, had jigs of sorts to line it up in sequence and my farm helper actually build a lot of them, you only had to square one part in one direction to get them to come out perfect. We take the pieces direct from the yard to the jig and smooth up the edges with a sander when they were finished. When I bid the job I wasnt low bidder, but a couple licks with a sander and a little better looking design made the prototype look way better than my competitions.
                    http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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