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  • 7018 Overhead

    Having problems with overhead stick 7018, icicles droops etc. (standard CWB coupon) when I cap it looks like our curtains.

    Anyone have any tips?

  • #2
    what size rod?

    i usually use 3/32 and run about 130 amps. make your to keep good close arc lenght.

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    • #3
      Think of overhead as being just like flat, upside-down. Really. Shove the rod in, almost, and move at a moderate speed. Too slow will give you grapes all over, just like too fast will give you poor fusion and voids. When running flat, you can run slower than ideal, because the metal will just build up a bit an won't run anywhere. Overhead, you CAN'T shovel the metal in as easily as flat.
      I may not be good looking, but I make up for it with my dazzling lack of personality

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      • #4
        It's 1/8" 7018 at approx 115 A, standard drag at 15°, Miller Dialarc 250 or Lincoln Idealarc 250. My technique is obviously the problem, have no consistency. Have no problem with flat, horizontal or vertical up.

        Enlpck...how much push on the rod do you use?

        Regards Frank.

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        • #5
          Frank,

          You've got to watch the puddle; it is the key to any welding in any position. Watch the puddle fill in behind you as you move. If you watch it overfill you will get grapes. Overhead is just as easy as flat.

          Have Fun!
          Bill C
          "The more I learn about welding the more I find there is to learn..."

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          • #6
            keep a very tight arc length. i also prefer to keep no angle at all when doing overhead. stick the rod strait into the puddle. wont hurt to turn your heat up 5 or so amps.

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            • #7
              As mentioned above, just imagine its flat....just don't think you can really dump the metal to it in one pass like you can flat.
              Click here to See pics of my work.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Frankw
                It's 1/8" 7018 at approx 115 A, standard drag at 15°, Miller Dialarc 250 or Lincoln Idealarc 250. My technique is obviously the problem, have no consistency. Have no problem with flat, horizontal or vertical up.

                Enlpck...how much push on the rod do you use?

                Regards Frank.
                The rod angle does want to be a little drag. When I say push the rod in I mean keep the rod pushed into the groove. About to where the flux drags. When I was learning, the guy teaching me said, basicly, "shove it till the rod is ready to bend, then MOVE". Try a few beads on flat plate to get the speed. You really don't want a lower current. On plate, run faster and faster until you start to see lack-of fusion and skipping, then slow down a little. If you try to put in too much metal, you get grapes.

                Another thing on overhead is that your grinder is your friend. You don't have the luxury of burning in as much as in other positions, so wire brush the weld dead clean between passes, and give a touch with a hard wheel where needed to get the surface ready for the next pass. I figure I'll use 20% more rod on overhead than vertical or flat, because I like to U-out where the next bead will go a little bit. Not a lot, just until it is smooth. In the long run, this is a lot faster and easier than cutting a weld out to do it over.
                I may not be good looking, but I make up for it with my dazzling lack of personality

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thank you gentlemen for the replies.

                  Enlpck...I cannot use a grinder on the CWB test (would be nice).

                  The CWB plate is a 90° edge and a 30° beveled edge.

                  I have passed the 1g, 2g, 3g positions big difficulty with 4g.

                  Info can be found here...http://www.grbwelding.com/images/CWBTest.pdf

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Frankw
                    Thank you gentlemen for the replies.

                    Enlpck...I cannot use a grinder on the CWB test (would be nice).

                    The CWB plate is a 90° edge and a 30° beveled edge.

                    I have passed the 1g, 2g, 3g positions big difficulty with 4g.

                    Info can be found here...http://www.grbwelding.com/images/CWBTest.pdf
                    Ok.. I have been blessed with being able to use a grinder on most of my tests. Then best adice I can give is try running a bunch of beads on the face of a plate at different speeds. You wil be able to see what the result is fairly easily and get a good idea of where you want to run.

                    Do they at least allow you files? (common arc does. or at least did) If so, dress the end of a medium-sized rat tail to about a 60 or 70 degree angle, and put a good handle on it. Use it like a U-gouge chisel on an air hammer. Same thing with a square file... dress it like a diamond-point chisel. If you keep the edge sharp, you don;t need impact. You can push it in enough to get the crud out and dress the surface by hand and dig a little, kind of like carving wood. And, you still have the file for smoothing.

                    If no files, you can do the same thing to the pointy end of a chipping hammer, but you need to sharpen it fairly often, as it isn;t as hard as the file. The cleaned, U-ed out groove helps a lot.
                    I may not be good looking, but I make up for it with my dazzling lack of personality

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Frank,

                      Where do you have your problems? Is it every pass, just the root passes, or ??? You are running stringers, correct?

                      How long have you been practicing 4G? To be honest, I was really dissapointed after my first overhead welds... I had always imagined it to be mystically challenging; separating the men from the boys. Turned out to be really easy; much easier than vertical. The only challenge was staying steady with my arms overhead at an awkward extension...

                      Everybody's given you great advice. You should be able to tell by looking at the puddle what is going on... If it starts to turn to crap then pull out and change your settings. It won't get any better as the part gets hotter...

                      Regards,
                      Bill C
                      "The more I learn about welding the more I find there is to learn..."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Another thing (that actually applies to all welding) is get relaxed. In the real world. you don't usually have control over the conditions when you weld, but in the shop, you do. I get laughed at for running overhead coupons with the arm on the mount pointing down and lowaered all the way, nd sitting on the floor braced against a bench leg. Real stable, good visibility for the weld, I can relax and not have to work to brace myself, and get into the zone. I may get laughed at, but my coupons bend clean. Much better welders than me can;t get a clean bend to save their lives, mostly because the have trouble staying within the parameters and because they stress about the test.
                        I may not be good looking, but I make up for it with my dazzling lack of personality

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Frankw
                          It's 1/8" 7018 at approx 115 A, standard drag at 15°, Miller Dialarc 250 or Lincoln Idealarc 250. My technique is obviously the problem, have no consistency. Have no problem with flat, horizontal or vertical up.

                          Enlpck...how much push on the rod do you use?

                          Regards Frank.
                          Good advice so far. Only thing I can add is about the angle of the rod. You will probably get your best results by keeping an open mind and not getting fixated on any one angle. Many times,in many situations, I have had to push,not drag, to get a good pass. As others before me have said---Watch the puddle--If it starts to get too long then use less angle.Your arc and puddle combination,in overhead, should look much the same as flats.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by enlpck
                            Another thing (that actually applies to all welding) is get relaxed.
                            That is excatly what took me the longest to figure out with overhead. To start with I have to hold on to something (wall or whatever) otherwise I would be all over the place.

                            Are CWB coupons not fillet welds? 4F instead of 4G? 3/8" plate with 1/4" backing strip.

                            In BC we were alowed grinders. A wire wheel makes it nicer.
                            Brian

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                            • #15
                              The FIRST RULE of Welding, GET COMFORTABLE!
                              jokers81

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