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  • Tig

    Attachment
    This is ½" steel tubing. It's what I like about the TIG process.
    This is a poor job compared to what some can do.

  • #2
    Tig

    1/2 inch is pretty tough, do you walk the cup when you can, or do you do all freehand welds?

    Nelson

    Comment


    • #3
      Material is 16 gauge mild steel and weld metal is 347 stainless. The coin is a dime, for reference. I was using a 3/32" tungsten. 1/16" would have been nicer.

      I never heard of cup-walking until recently. I think it would be too restrictive. I like to be fluid with my hand movements when I TIG weld. The torch should be a feather in your hand, too, to get the best results.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Tig

        Originally posted by Nelson Hendrix
        1/2 inch is pretty tough, do you walk the cup when you can, or do you do all freehand welds?

        Nelson
        Nelson; I walk the cup when it's possible. In case of ½" tubing pictured, it would be hard to do. I'm sure many can do it. I don't proclaim to be a good TIG welder.

        Comment


        • #5
          By chance there were a couple short peices of scrap 1/2" and 3/8" round tube on the welding table when I arrived at work today. So I went ahead and used them to weld up a few examples. The welding process is TIG. The material is 304L stainless steel. the filler rod used is 1/16" 308L stainless steel. Wall thickness on tube was about .050. tube is welded to 1/8" flat bar. Machine used was a Lincoln squarewave 175. Amperage at machine was roughly 50, which allowed me to use the entire distance of travel on the foot peddle.

          TheOLdOne, I hope you don t think that Im trying to show you up. By know means is this my intention. Like you TIG is my favorite process and I just wanted to share my results, because if I remember right you have the Lincoln 175 too, and I thought this might help you some.

          The first two picture are the 1/2" tube and the third picture is the 3/8" tube.
          Last edited by Dan; 05-01-2009, 08:14 AM.
          MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
          Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


          PM 180C



          HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

          Comment


          • #6
            2nd pic
            Last edited by Dan; 05-01-2009, 08:14 AM.
            MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
            Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


            PM 180C



            HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

            Comment


            • #7
              last pic
              Last edited by Dan; 05-01-2009, 08:14 AM.
              MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
              Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


              PM 180C



              HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Dan
                By chance there were a couple short peices of scrap 1/2" and 3/8" round tube on the welding table when I arrived at work today. So I went ahead and used them to weld up a few examples. The welding process is TIG. The material is 304L stainless steel. the filler rod used is 308L stainless steel. Wall thickness on tube was about .050. tube is welded to 1/8" flat bar. Machine used was a Lincoln squarewave 175. Amperage at machine was roughly 50, which allowed me to use the entire distance of travel on the foot peddle.

                TheOLdOne, I hope you don t think that Im trying to show you up. By know means is this my intention. Like you TIG is my favorite process and I just wanted to share my results, because if I remember right you have the Lincoln 175 too, and I thought this might help you some.

                The first two picture are the 1/2" tube and the third picture is the 3/8" tube.
                Dan; Maybe you ain't trying to show me up but you did it. Nice looking job. Keep the pictures coming. I'll do some more practice and possibly before I go under I may be able to figure the whole thing out.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I have never even seen a TIG welder much less used one what is the foot pedal used for ?

                  - jack

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by morpheus
                    I have never even seen a TIG welder much less used one what is the foot pedal used for ?

                    - jack
                    Jack

                    the foot pedal is a remote current control. It allows you to vary your welding current up or down as you progress along with the weld bead. There is also a hand operated control available that attaches to the TIG torch. However, in my opinion the foot control is the easier of the two to use. The hand control comes in handy though when the area you have to weld in doesn t allow you the option of using the foot pedal. Foot pedal is actually deceiving, because some situations require me to use my knee to operate the pedal. Other times too I have had to use my calf while lying on my back under equipment. Mainy though it is operated by your foot.

                    The current range that you are controlling with this controller is from the minimum amperage of the machine to what ever current setting you choose to set at the machine as your maximum. I personally like to set my maximum setting on the machine so that it is slightly above what I will need to weld my joint. By setting the machine this way I have a high amount of control over my welding currrent in the range I have the machine set at. If I had the machine always set at maximum current output and tried to weld 16 ga sheetmetal, just slightly bumping the pedal could end up being to much current. However , if I lower my current setting down to maybe 50 amps to weld the same joint, I will then need to almost use the entire travel of the foot pedal to reach my desired welding current.

                    Im attaching a picture of the foot pedal that comes with my Econotig.
                    Last edited by Dan; 05-01-2009, 08:14 AM.
                    MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
                    Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


                    PM 180C



                    HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      ok. I understand now. Tig welding seems like a much more complex procedure.

                      - jack

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by morpheus
                        ok. I understand now. Tig welding seems like a much more complex procedure.

                        - jack
                        Well, I would say it's just different....similar to Oxy / Acetylene welding, insofar as you have a torch that creates the heat, and a filler rod to add to the puddle. The beauty of the foot pedal, also called a rheostat, can control your heat without affecting your hand motion.

                        Like Dan, I too have a similar job in which I may have to weld something on the floor, or up under some greasy machine, and have to operate the foot pedal with your elbow, or knee or even have someone else do it for you. No fun, but it sure does give you a feeling of accomplishment when you're done.

                        While we're on the subject, I know The Miller guys like to hear feedback as to how we use their machines. The foot pedal we have mostly on our SquareWave 350's is a big clunky steel cased rheostat. I do like them, but the first thing I do when I get a new one is to pop the rubber feet off it. I need to have the foot pedal slide on the floor, as I crawl around what I am welding. Otherwise I would have to bend over and pick it up every time I wanted to move it even just a little bit. IMHO, the rubber feet prevent it from being ergonomic. As a matter of fact, I used to make a holder for my foot, and weld it on to the pedal, so that I could twist the pedal on the floor...kinda like the gas pedal on a dragster.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by morpheus
                          ok. I understand now. Tig welding seems like a much more complex procedure.

                          - jack
                          Jack, the process is actually a bit more on the simple side. When welding overhead I use one of two different hand amptrols. One has a slider to vary the current and the other is just on / off. When working overhead I like the on / off amptrol. For bench work the foot operated amptrol works the best for me.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Thanks for the info guys. I've never oxy/act welded. I've got a MIG, stick and am fairly proffecient with them and a oxy/act rig that I use for cutting but have never welded anything with it because i don't know how. I've been trying to get into some welding/machine classes at the local junior college but they either don't teach welding anymore or I have no idea what the class would be named.

                            Tig welding just seems more complex to me compared to stick or mig because you're adjusting the current and adding filler when necessary as you're welding where with a mig or stick it's all kinda happening for me. Not sure if I'm that coordinated to do so many things at one time

                            - jack

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by morpheus
                              Thanks for the info guys. I've never oxy/act welded. I've got a MIG, stick and am fairly proffecient with them and a oxy/act rig that I use for cutting but have never welded anything with it because i don't know how. I've been trying to get into some welding/machine classes at the local junior college but they either don't teach welding anymore or I have no idea what the class would be named.

                              Tig welding just seems more complex to me compared to stick or mig because you're adjusting the current and adding filler when necessary as you're welding where with a mig or stick it's all kinda happening for me. Not sure if I'm that coordinated to do so many things at one time

                              - jack
                              Don't sell yourself short, Jack...if I can do it, ANYBODY can do it...I can't walk and chew gum at the same time!

                              Comment

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