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7018 Vert up!

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  • #16
    When you guys are saying "point the rod up", you're meaning to use a "push" angle, correct?

    My vertical stick skills could sure use some improvement, so I'm doing a lot of learning here too!
    Brian
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    • #17
      Originally posted by treeplanter
      skooter there are alot of good advice on for you here. if you really want to know why you don`t weld down hill on a fillet or t-weld-- make a weld vertical up and make one down hill, 6 inches is long enough,then put each test in a vise ,take a hammer and proceed to bend the top piece. another input on what gwmotor said forget about the triangle method--if you`re doing one pass and one pass only it`s a very good method practice on it and you will see. i agree with what he said on the back and forth method as long as it is your second or more pass.like the other have said lay a single bead for your first or root pass meaning push the weld up. keep trying treeplanter
      Ahh sorry but HazMat55 asked that question. I've always been taught that its better to use Vert up for heavier stuff.

      I thank you kindly for your advice

      Andrew
      Last edited by Skooter; 01-10-2006, 09:53 PM.
      Andrew.


      CIGWELD Transmig 250 Remote!!
      Weld NZ 160amp DC pulse/DC Tig / Stick
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      • #18
        Originally posted by enlpck
        The technique advise given is what you want.. slightly lower current, point the rod up a bit. and straight side to side weave, pausing a tad at the sides to filll the undercut. The heat runs up ahead of you. 'Build a shelf' is the same advice any experienced welder will give.

        Also, it isn't only the weld metal that is your friend... the slag supports the weld metal while it solidifies. Use this to your advantage.

        Why up? Rods that produce a heavy slag, like '18, tend to trap slag when run down. It is an advanced skill to burn the slag out ahead of you. The slag will also provide poor coverage of the weld metal. 6010 doesn't have a runny, heavy slag, and will tend to burn its own slag out as you weld. Up is often described as stronger, but down can be just as strong... but it IS harder to do, with any rod.

        Many code procedures, and some codes, require up for several reasons, the primary one (or so I am told) is there is less likelyhood of a defect in the weld, such as trapped slag, as well as the lower (but still substantial) skill level required.

        Thanks for your good advice.

        Andrew
        Andrew.


        CIGWELD Transmig 250 Remote!!
        Weld NZ 160amp DC pulse/DC Tig / Stick
        Telwin Bimax 152 Mig
        NZIG Handi AC Stick
        NZIG Comet 3 O/A Set

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        • #19
          Originally posted by gwmotorsports
          7018s aren't really designed for use downhill. It works ok for doing a quick seal weld that doesnt have to have any strength. For anything structural you have to weld vertical up, because of the reasons that Mac posted. 6010 on the other hand can be ran vertical down. As far as I know they use this technique mostly in cross country pipelines, and they will do the entire weld 6010 (actuall probably something like 8010) downhill. .
          Not an entirely correct statement. A friend that is a Pipefitter worked a job last summer and fall at the airport welding pipe for a fuel transfer system. They were welding to an API code. They used 7010 downhill for the root pass then 7018 also downhill for the fill and cap passes.
          Besides the Pipefitters there were also some Pipeline weldors from Local 798 on the job. Steve's comments were "Man that 7018 downhill is a *****. Those pipeliners make it look easy"
          So while most of us think only of uphill with 7018, to some, downhill is their norm.
          Last edited by Aeroweld; 01-10-2006, 10:50 PM.

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          • #20
            Lincoln does make a lo-hy rod for downhill or vertical down welding.It is their Pipeliner lincoln LH-D80 it`s an 8018-G.Used for pipe welding on pipe up to X70.It`s also offered in 9018 and 100-18.

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            • #21
              7018 vert up

              SIR,
              in one of your post you mention 7016.
              i looked at my rod chart, and there is no
              listing for this rod. is this a typo?
              wlbrown

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              • #22
                wlbrown,
                Not sure wich post you are refering but Lincoln does make a E7016 H4. It`s their Pipeliner 16P Designed for vert-up, lo-hy and used on pipe up to API 5L-X65 runs on both DC+ and AC.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by wlbrown
                  SIR,
                  in one of your post you mention 7016.
                  i looked at my rod chart, and there is no
                  listing for this rod. is this a typo?
                  wlbrown
                  No typo bud.
                  7016 is a Basic Coated Low Hydrogen Electrode.
                  Less common than 7018's but vert nice to work with.

                  Andrew
                  Andrew.


                  CIGWELD Transmig 250 Remote!!
                  Weld NZ 160amp DC pulse/DC Tig / Stick
                  Telwin Bimax 152 Mig
                  NZIG Handi AC Stick
                  NZIG Comet 3 O/A Set

                  Comment

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