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  • #16
    I'm pretty sure. I think it all depends on what the project calls for. Maybe different welding standards for different pipe. My pipe fitters book says that there has to be a 1/8" gap though. Maybe 3/32 - 1/8". I'll have to check.

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    • #17
      coupon edge

      many many coupon makers feather the edge to a point and the welder will grind back the landing to whatever he likes....some use next to no landing and keep the gap close...some may go heavier on the thickness of the landing and make the penetration gap larger......answer...welders choice..so long as the bend is good in the test..do whatever turns your crank

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      • #18
        Open butt v with 7018 root is used a lot more in the Boilermakers than in process piping. I've never taken one but I have friends who have tested on it. It's much more common in Europe from what I hear.
        The boilermakers that use it regularly say it's not bad once you get the hang of it.

        JTMcC.

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        • #19
          Ya,, I ran one like that a long time ago,,, maybe 20+ yrs. I am trying to remember the details but I think it was downhill root???. As I recall it was for Chicago Bridge and Iron anf despite the name they were more of a boilermaker outfit, tanking too and it was for some factory repair in a paper mill.
          http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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          • #20
            Mike c the 45 degree test is the 6g test. Tom the gap is one GTAW 1/8'' for the gap for practise bent as an l in the bevel and taped on one side to the pipe. Then you tack pipe inbetween the tabs and make sure the pipe lays even over the other pipe and not lean more on one side than the other when you tack inbetween the bevels. When you tack inbetween the tabs you do one side and then straight across and tack the other side, like a criss cross pattern. Then you take the tabs and break them off. Hope this helps if you need any more questions let me know

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            • #21
              Been a long time since I was involved with that type of welding...
              Depending on the specific weld procedure and the criticality of the specific joint, they wouldn't let us run stick on the root pass at all. We had to go with TIG (E70S2) on the root. They didn't want any of that 60k psi material in the weld. They would allow us to weld the root only and then would NDE/Xray the root to ensure all was ok before allowing it to be sticked out w/ 7018, then xrayed again when finished. I remember if you busted out more than a couple of times, they'd terminate ya.....

              HH187
              Stars & Stripes BWE signed by Andy
              TA185TSW w/Miller Radiator 1
              DHC2000 & Victor O/A
              Parker Plasma 40

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              • #22
                I used to weld 70 80 9018 open root in a code shop all the time 7+ yrs on aircooled heat exchangers all the piping and headers were all open root all code work all x-ray or ut all position weld always left a beautiful crown on the i.d. all welding was done uphill .
                Lance N

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                • #23
                  We certified for a project in South Africa on a recovery boiler. These were window welds and the window was supposed to be welded in with a E7018 root and fill. We all tested and certified, flew over and ended up using GTAW instead.

                  WIndow welds described
                  Good day

                  Gerald Austin
                  http://www.weldingdata.com

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                  • #24
                    I’m a welder at Stelco where we only test with 7018 open root. We’re expected to use 7018 for all our high pressure pipe jobs even though there’s only one application in the whole plant that this is necessary. The reason being it’s able to withstand a heavy load under pressure and in extreme heat. I don’t weld in that area of the plant but that’s the certification I hold because it’s a harder test to pass and it trumps all other weld certificates for this plant therefore they don’t have to do all kinds of certifications for different applications.

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                    • #25
                      We have to splice pipe at work for backstops or to hold some type of net at the end of golf driving range. Backing pipe is just a tight fitting piece of bare pipe about 4" long. This allows a good beveled gap between the pipes. Sometimes have to cut a slit in the backer and then clamp it closed, then tack it to shrink it slightly. I am not "qualified" for that wire and joint configuration. Frankly, I have so much work to do at the company as it is that I didn't really want to take the qualification test. I have qualification for T- 11 wire as well as 7018 rod, open root.
                      The nice thing about a backer is that you can run hotter and faster on the root as you are running right into the backer. The backer stays in the pipe.
                      A bit off topic, but, backers were for structural work so might not be applicable for what was mentioned. I was clarifying backer use after seeing them referred to in a few posts.
                      Last edited by gatemaker; 09-07-2019, 09:41 PM.
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