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  • whipping technique?

    i was stick welding (7018) when i came across a 6010 electrode it has been years since i used 6010, is that the electrode that uses the whipping technique? if not which eledctrode uses the whipping technique?
    thanks,
    matt

  • #2
    Yeah, 6010 and 6011.

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    • #3
      .

      thanks Rocky D, i remember doing it in school, i had alot of trouble with it at first and then one day i got the hang of it and i loved it ! but that was years ago , i know it is going to be like starting all over again.

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      • #4
        could one of you guys define "whipping technique" ?

        is this just a normal weave or what ?

        I tried my hand at 6010's in class last night and finally got the hang of horizontal welds pretty good. but my t-joints looked like splatters of bubble gum.

        - jack

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        • #5
          .

          the whipping technique is where you form a puddle then pull the electrode completely out of the puddle useing your wrist in a whipping motion toward the direction of travel (letting it freeze) then bring it back in to the leading edge of the puddle and start a new puddle, then so on and so on untill u finish your bead. it is a fast freeze electrode. it takes alot of practice (very frustrating at first!!!!) but when u get the hang of it, it is alot of fun. i did not think i would ever get it , but my teacher made us get this technique down before moveing on.
          matt

          have fun and don't get frustrated

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          • #6
            Speaking for myself, 6010 is much easier than welding with 7018. It takes a lot of work with the whipping, but the puddle is so clearly defined it is hard to go wrong! My classmates who learned 6010 by memorizing timing of the whipping motion were screwed as soon as the material thickness or geometry changed. Learn to watch the puddle and 6010 is easy. With 7018 the puddle is covered by molten flux. Much harder until you learn to read the flux instead of the puddle...
            Bill C
            "The more I learn about welding the more I find there is to learn..."

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            • #7
              Actually Bill, you want to read the puddle and not the flux. its difficult to teach 6010 well. I use it in the field a lot for light metals, lots of downhill actually and gap fills. Doesnt anyone here call 7018 lo-hi?
              http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Sberry27
                Actually Bill, you want to read the puddle and not the flux. its difficult to teach 6010 well. I use it in the field a lot for light metals, lots of downhill actually and gap fills. Doesnt anyone here call 7018 lo-hi?
                You are correct, I guess I really am watching the edges of the puddle. There's just so much flux chasing me it is difficult not to watch it too. That's probably why I am still learning with the 7018 and why the 6010 was easy for me; the puddle is SO visible...
                Bill C
                "The more I learn about welding the more I find there is to learn..."

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                • #9
                  Heat settings are critical with lo-hi also for quality deposits. When it is almost perfect you can see tiny bubbles coming out of the puddle. You have to look really close to see them.
                  http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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                  • #10
                    Bill,

                    7018 or Lo-Hy as it's called, produces a prettier weld bead with much less effort that the 60xx rods. The trick with 7018 is not to let the slag obscure the puddle. If it's possible, have a slight incline to keep the slag i back of the puddle. When it's done right, in the flat position, the slag will peel up behind the weld like a scorpions tail. Then you know you have achieved! once you get the hang of it, it will be your rod of choice.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Sberry27
                      Doesnt anyone here call 7018 lo-hi?
                      7018 is a low-hydrogen electrode, but not all low-hydrogen rods are 7018. If it's the only lo-hi you're working with, maybe.

                      It's strength and ductility makes it my "rod of choice."

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