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  • Father & Son activity

    Please bear with me on this post. My son asked me if we could set the welder up, so that he could watch Dad weld. So we set up our Econotig, and I welded up a couple lap joints on some 16 ga mild steel. After this he asked if he could take a picture of the welds and put them on the computer so that the guys can see them. So, we are posting a picture that he took of one of my lap joints. By the way Im suprised that weld turned out as good as it did, because I ve miss placed my 1/16" 2% thoriated tungsten. So , I ended up having to use a 3/32" 2% thoriated that came with my torch, and since I was running way below the current range of the tungsten, I kept loosing the tip of the taper to erosion.

    Also, my son thinks the colors on the weld are cool so we didn t brush the weld off. So, the color you see is how the weld should look just after welding the joint.

    Anyway here is the picture.
    Last edited by Dan; 05-01-2009, 08:18 AM.
    MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
    Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


    PM 180C



    HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

  • #2
    Dan,what type,and size filler rod where you using?Looks like your son has got the camera thing down,now hand him the torch.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Scott V
      Dan,what type,and size filler rod where you using?Looks like your son has got the camera thing down,now hand him the torch.
      Scott

      For TIG welding on mild steel I use ER70S-2. I used a 1/16" diameter rod for this joint.

      The camera I have is pretty user friendly, it has to be since I operate it the most.

      My boy is a little young to be welding, but he does have his own hood. When I first got the Econotig he watched the video that came with it every evening at bed time. So, he pretty much has the set up and operation of the machine memorized. He also did the same thing with the video that came with my MM 210. Plus there is a third video that I have called GMAW Wire feed welding. He has watched this video so many times that if you ask him to set up any joint design he can do it .
      MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
      Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


      PM 180C



      HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

      Comment


      • #4
        Dan,Thats kind of what I thought you would of used.Also it doesn't sound like it will be to long before we gets some more great picks out of another one from your family.Hows you wifes welding,Sometimes they all a real natural at tig welding.It's that hand eye thing that they have over most men,or is it just using their sewing machines with the foot pedal?

        Comment


        • #5
          Women seem to pick up O/A and TIG better than men. They aslo seem to be easier to teach fly fishing. I don't know if its hand/eye coordination or they simply follow instructions.

          Comment


          • #6
            Women seem to learn anything they want to much like men. I tought sailing one summer. One rule we had was put husbands and wifes in different boats. Everyone learned better that way.

            Comment


            • #7
              Dan, the dad and son thing is totally cool...say. maybe it's the picture...but it looks like your weld slid off the joint near the end!!! is this true??

              That reminds me of a time many years ago when I was a partying weldor and wasn't getting much sleep. I was welding in a purge chamber with a curtain around the back of me to block out the light form the overhead lighting, so here I am in a quiet peaceful situation and fell asleep when I was welding a long standing flange burn down and the weld went right off the joint onto parent material! Had to scrap the part!

              Comment


              • #8
                Cope,

                one other thing they do better right of the bat is shoot guns better.Just something to think about.

                Comment


                • #9
                  This is true.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Rocky D
                    Dan, the dad and son thing is totally cool...say. maybe it's the picture...but it looks like your weld slid off the joint near the end!!! is this true??

                    That reminds me of a time many years ago when I was a partying weldor and wasn't getting much sleep. I was welding in a purge chamber with a curtain around the back of me to block out the light form the overhead lighting, so here I am in a quiet peaceful situation and fell asleep when I was welding a long standing flange burn down and the weld went right off the joint onto parent material! Had to scrap the part!
                    Rocky

                    The picture is creating an illusion. I stopped the weld right in front of a large tack that was made without filler. I didn t know we were going to be posting this picture on the site so I was a little sloppy on the tacks. So, because of this, it makes the edge of the top piece look farther back then it reality. Besides the fact that I never loose site of the weld joint . Honestly though the weld puddle on this thickness of material and actually down to 20 ga for some reason seems quite large to me and is very easy for me to see. Well, that is as long as I m using the proper shade of lens. For 16 ga I use a number 9, and for 20 ga a number 8 that I finally found in stock at my local Praxair.

                    I have to admit though one time at work I was welding on a project, left to go to lunch. And when I came back and started to weld again I had to strain like crazy to see the weld joint that I was welding on. It had me worried for a few minutes, until I noticed that my hood was set to shade 13. What happened was while I was gone to lunch our head electrician who is a close friend of mine decided to try the hood out at different settings to see if it really works. Well, at least this is the story that he told me. More then likely though he was pulling a joke on me, and gave me the story so that I wouldn t seek revenge on him.

                    Oh yeah, by the way there are a few guys that I work with who weld like you did in your sleep, however the difference is though they are awake. There welds scare me sometimes. The sad thing is that there quality of weld seems to be acceptable in this line of maintenance. At least my boss is wise enough to have me to weld up all the critical projects. However because of this my list of projects is starting to become quite lengthy. And since I m not just as weldor, I also am a mechanic and maintenance electrician, I can be right in the middle of a project and end up getting called out on to the production floor for something. Which by the way seems to happen the most when I have a large list of projects. On my recent stair project it seemed like on average I was able to get about 3 hrs to 4 hrs of actual time in on the project each evening. And I don t mean 3 or 4 hrs without an interuptions this is a combined total for the entire shift.

                    Well, I ve left the topic again so I ll end this here
                    Last edited by Dan; 03-09-2003, 01:52 AM.
                    MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
                    Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


                    PM 180C



                    HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

                    Comment

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