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7018's - Is it time?

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  • 7018's - Is it time?

    Need some imput. This may take a minute to explain.

    Have been happily welding as a project/minor repair/hobby welder using the 6010's, 6011's, 6013's & 7014 welding rods. But I'm starting to do a lot more on a regular basis lately. Have not considered the low hydrogen rods because I don't have a storage oven. There are a lot of professional and highly experienced welders that during the course of many discussions will recommend the use of the 7018 rod and no other even if it is apparent that the advise is to a hobby welder. A few have stressed that proper storage is a necessity for these rods.

    I am now involved in a small stone quarry with crushers, conveyors, and such that receive a lot of stress and vibration that will require welding maintenance. I am starting to doubt if I have the right rods now. Nothing I will be welding will be less than 1/8 to 5/32" thick and up to 1" thick. Power is not a problem.

    My question is, is the 7018 the rod of rods?
    Is it the best for strength and useability?
    Will it be the best performing in these type of conditions?

    I am willing to put out the $$ for an oven if this is the direction I should be considering. Repair work is not the same as fabrication, but I'm sure there will always be something to do.

    Your thoughts and advice is appreciated. Just trying to do the best welds I can.
    Last edited by Snidley; 02-24-2003, 09:49 AM.
    Snidley :}
    Here in the Great White North
    Mosquitoes can't fly at 40 below

  • #2
    7018 is not a cure-all by any means, however, you will find that heavy section thickness will demand a rod with low hydrogen characteristics.
    In quarry work you will find that manganese steel will require different filler wire, and that quite a bit of time is spent resurfacing worn parts, and then hard facing them.
    As experience is the best teacher, I would say 'go at it'.
    If you don't have a good welding handbook, now is the time to get one.
    P. S.
    If you are going to get into quarry repair work in a big way, I'd look at getting a feeder, and running flux core. The Hefty, The Sp -32, and the LN-25 are the industry standards.
    Best wishes.
    work safe, always wear your safety glasses.


    Edward Heimbach

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    • #3
      Ed..

      I'm not concerned with the build up and hardfacing of the rolls and stuff like that yet since that is pretty specialized. The focus will be on all the other areas. Cross members, stairs, hoppers, grizzly feeders, conveyors etc., and all the things that get banged up.

      Thanks for the info. I'll have to learn how to post pictures as this progresses to show what I'm up to.
      Snidley :}
      Here in the Great White North
      Mosquitoes can't fly at 40 below

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      • #4
        I you haven't seen 7018...this is what it looks like. I repaired a deck plate today and thought a picture might be of some help to some one.

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        • #5
          Brother Snidley, I use 7018's just about on a daily basis in applications from structural iron and buildings to phosphate plants, mines, power plants, etc. and I think the 7018's will work great for you. A properly welded joint will hold up to extreme vibration. A year ago, I welded some 1/4" steel plate to the top of a rock crusher on three sides to prevent spillage and the crusher is still operating with all three sides in place. Also used them to repair a tooth on a front-end loader at the same mine and the piece is still in place. I, personally, swear by 7018's. A good 60 series root, chipped and brushed, and covered with a 7018, is as good as it gets in the mines and plants. Good luck with your new adventure, Brother. Wont take you long to move up to flux core.
          Buy Union, Buy American, the job you save may be your own.

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          • #6
            hot box

            Snidley, making a hot box is extremely easy and cheap! Depending on your space limitations, pick up an old refrigerator, big or small, and wire a regular old 75 or 100 watt light bulb receptacle on the inside, preferably low. (heat rises) The bulb will stay on 24/7, so get a long life bulb (the 75 watt bulbs I use last up to 3 months!) Also, get a digital indoor/outdoor thermometer and mount to the outside of the box, with the "outside" sensor inside the unit, in the opposite corner of the bulb. That way you can see the temp of the hot box (and know when the bulb burns out), and you'll have a handy dandy thermometer for inside your shop.
            I made my hotbox out of a huge freezer, and one 75 watt bulb will heat the whole thing to 100 deg with an outside temp of 50, up to 118 deg when it's a nice day. I realize that's not the optimum temp, but combined with a good amount of dessicant (available from anyone who sells big gun safes and cases) makes for a trouble free, CHEAP and convinient way to store everything from LoHi to aluminum rod and filler. I have 7018 that's 3 years old and it is still as good as new.
            Hope this helps!
            Matt

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            • #7
              Take a couple 150 watt lamps and wire them in series, will give 75 watts of power but the lamps will last a loooonnnnnnngggg time. I am going to make an oven from a small regular oven, thermostat and all, very insulated. I need to do better than the lighbulb in the cooler trick as we use wire mostly and a box of rods last forever here anymore. Only time we really use them is portable. I had the lighbulb burn out and I got tired of it so I finally made the series fixture. So far havnt had to replace one.
              http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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              • #8
                good tip, I think I might try that. With the two lamps in series, what temp is your box running at?
                Matt

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                • #9
                  I didnt thermo it yet. The rods need to be reconditioned in an oven but I only used 2-100's in it as I didnt have any thing else. That only gives 50 watts of heat so you want to consider that. 2-200's would give 100 watts. I have a cooler, like a 32 quart cooler but its metal and the 50's are not enuf. With a hundred in it used to heat that you almost couldnt hold them in your hand. Its not that hot now and I should put a couple 200's in.
                  http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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                  • #10
                    Unless you're doing work that is certified , you don't have to keep this rod in an oven, I've had this rod on my truck for years and use it all the time on projects and haven't had any problem with the rod

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                    • #11
                      Dano, it's my belief that every single little part that we do, as fabricators, should be done to the utmost of our ability, and make every single weld like it's going to be x-ray'd. But I guess that's just me

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                      • #12
                        I agree it will run without being in an oven. The main reason to store it hot is for multi pass on thicker plates or harder steels.
                        http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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                        • #13
                          My comment on the rod was for those who are thinking they can't buy the rod and use it until they invest in an oven. The average guy will never have to use one (oven), and never be xrayed. Also if you are fabbing in a quarry the rule is probably if you can't knock it off with a hammer then its probably ok. I am just trying to keep someone who wants to try it but thinks its only for the bigboys. Its not , they call it jetweld and its something that the home and farm welder can buy , throw on the shelf and use it when the need arises. If all you have ever used is 6010 then byall means try it you may like it. This is a forum for the average joe, and he will never have to worry about metalugical policies and procedures

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                          • #14
                            I realize that, but I'm just trying to say that if someone wants to do things as best he possibly can, then that person should recieve all the support in the world. I realize that sometimes it's impractical to do things PERFECT, but for the rest of your projects, perfect never hurt anyone.
                            Matt

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                            • #15
                              I agree it doesnt have to be perfect to use, we are just speaking a little theory here too. Some of the new stuff is suposed to be MR too,, dont know much about it though. But I do have an interesting story. My friend worked for a tile guy, underground. They fit up a shoe for this thing,, big thick piece. Took days. His dummy boss (who knows more about this stuff than most people) despite objections, instead of buying 2 or 3 boxes of new rod as was suggested finds several open boxes that a factory was throwing out,,, duh. Insists there is no logical reason to do anything different has them weld it on. Another couple days. First day, first big rock they hit,, snap like an icecicle,, hahaha
                              http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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