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Beginner Problems with MIG on Multi Handler 200

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  • Beginner Problems with MIG on Multi Handler 200

    I'm struggling to get my welder to make a consistent arc. I consistently get wire burn back and melted contact tips even when I'm running a higher wire feed speed than recommended. I'm new to welding so suspect its my lack of skill, but haven't been able to figure it out. I'm running a brand new Multi Hander 200, and suspecting there maybe something wrong with wire feed speed. Is there any easy way to check that wire feed is working correctly? Any advice on what to try next would be appreciated.

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  • #2
    Try adjusting wire speed with tip out in open.... If it varies then its ok ... Yes you will waste a little wire.... Initial indications are your sick out is not enough allowing to much heat back into contact tip and gas shield....Also what amperage are you running at...And what is material you are trying to weld...
    "Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson..

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    • #3
      Position the machine close enough to the work piece so you can adjust the wire speed while welding. Start with a low number such as 3 then very slowly increase the speed till you get a smooth arc. If that doesn't work, perhaps the machine has an electrical issue. The picture is my settings on my HH140 and I very very seldom have to change then even when I use .023, .024 or .030 wire.
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      • #4
        I’m running 18.5 volts and stepped up the wire feed speed to 420 ipm on 0.030 wire (recommended is 360 or so ipm) I’m just trying to practice running a bead on some 1/8 mild steel plate. I tried to manually time the feed speed by just feeding some wire out of the gun, but machine goes into jog mode. I’m not sure if jog mode is the same feed speed or not as the ipm setting. It also appears my machine has a slow feed speed to start then speeds up. Not sure if this maybe a cause of my issue.

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        • #5
          I'm not familiar with the model in question, but I assume You are using gas, Argon / CO2. Correct pressure is very important, and 30 psi is an excellent setting. This has been confirmed by an expert from the AWS. Have you tried my suggestion to adjust wire speed while running a bead? Check all connections for tightness. I once had a bird nest issue and loosened up my gun cable from the machine and when I struck and arc, I almost soiled myself because of the reaction I got when I struck an arc. I had forgotten to tighten the cable inside the machine.

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          • #6
            I am unfamiliar with that machine, but I can tell you if you try to do GMAW welding with a CC (constant current) machine like a Stick welder, this will also happen. I see the word "Multi" in the name, so I would verify you are using a CV (constant voltage) setting.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Hunter55 View Post
              I'm not familiar with the model in question, but I assume You are using gas, Argon / CO2. Correct pressure is very important, and 30 psi is an excellent setting. This has been confirmed by an expert from the AWS. Have you tried my suggestion to adjust wire speed while running a bead? Check all connections for tightness. I once had a bird nest issue and loosened up my gun cable from the machine and when I struck and arc, I almost soiled myself because of the reaction I got when I struck an arc. I had forgotten to tighten the cable inside the machine.
              Lets keep it technically correct, it actually CFH or Cubic Feet per Hour....Not PSI... Got into angry fight over on a tractor forum from some guy who insisted he wanted to know the "pressure" of the shield gas when several people tried to explain it was "volume" expressed in CFH.... TO this day you can not try to explain anything to the man because of the angry backlash of I'm right and you are a "dumb bunny" for trying to tell me different...
              Last edited by Dale M.; 07-18-2021, 08:50 AM.
              "Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson..

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              • #8
                Thanks for the correction, Its not the first time I've done that

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Hunter55 View Post
                  Thanks for the correction, Its not the first time I've done that
                  Even this graphic angered him..... By the way the person is a aircraft mechanic and the whole world is wrong according to his training....


                  "Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson..

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                  • #10
                    I’m running 20-25 CFH of 75%Ar/25%CO2. I’ll try increasing my flow rates and see if that helps. I’m not sure if I’m in CC or CV mode. I assume that I’m in CV mode, but unclear as the instruction manual doesn’t tell me much

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Dale M. View Post
                      Lets keep it technically correct, it actually CFH or Cubic Feet per Hour....Not PSI... Got into angry fight over on a tractor forum from some guy who insisted he wanted to know the "pressure" of the shield gas when several people tried to explain it was "volume" expressed in CFH...
                      I meant to make the same correction. Thanks. It's an important distinction, as some may get a regulator from another source, and it will be labeled and designed to measure the pressure and not the flow. The numbers will be meaningless to a welding shielding gas application, and it probably will not have a useful adjustment range.

                      I'll bet he had a LITTLE knowledge, and screwed up the real world application and explanation. He would be correct in that the regulator itself is regulating pressure and using the low-side pressure to move the needle, and it COULD be measured in PSI if the gauge was designed for it. But the entire assembly uses a calibrated orifice that delivers a known flow at a known pressure. And the gauge is labeled for the flow.

                      The orifice in the flowmeter regulator is the restriction of the system. In other applications, like your oxy-acetylene torch, the torch body has the needle valves for controlling the flow. Therefore, the regulator has no restriction so it can deliver its requested pressure AT FULL FLOW straight into the hose, and it won't be significantly restricted until the torch valves.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by skunkel View Post
                        I’m running 20-25 CFH of 75%Ar/25%CO2. I’ll try increasing my flow rates and see if that helps. I’m not sure if I’m in CC or CV mode. I assume that I’m in CV mode, but unclear as the instruction manual doesn’t tell me much
                        according to the photo you posted you are in the correct mode/process.
                        The screen has the MIG icon displayed.

                        The Hobart has a Run In speed function too- it will start off slowly then ramp up to the correct wire speed. This is supposed to help with starting the bead.

                        I believed it is fixed run in speed and can not be adjusted.

                        Ed Conley
                        Screaming Broccoli, Inc
                        http://www.screamingbroccoli.net/
                        MM252
                        MM211
                        Miller Passport Plus, Spoolmate 100
                        TA185
                        SO 2020 Bender
                        Miller 125c Plasma
                        "Hold my beer while I try this!"

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                        • #13
                          Check the wire tension. Could be too tight.


                          Ed Conley
                          Screaming Broccoli, Inc
                          http://www.screamingbroccoli.net/
                          MM252
                          MM211
                          Miller Passport Plus, Spoolmate 100
                          TA185
                          SO 2020 Bender
                          Miller 125c Plasma
                          "Hold my beer while I try this!"

                          Comment

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