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Spot stitch panel adaptation, is it possible?

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  • Spot stitch panel adaptation, is it possible?

    I have this spot stitch panel and was wondering if it could be adapted to a little HH135? Or something else? 5 terminals have to connect some where wouldn't you think? If so, what connects where? I'm not sure what it's off of, although I'm guessing it's 20 years old or better. That said, if someone can tell me what it's off I could maybe find a manual and answer my own question?

    HOBART #406669
    200736 R4
    299985A R7

    Possible part number on the bag it was stored (?), Beta Mig 200, #200010A

    That said, I'm not in love with or need the panel, but it appears new and who likes to toss new away? Thanks.

  • #2
    Not sure how you could ever get it to work on a H135 but I am pretty sure this was used in the old BetaMig 200 and 250 units.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Hobart Expert Keith View Post
      Not sure how you could ever get it to work on a H135 but I am pretty sure this was used in the old BetaMig 200 and 250 units.
      Thank for the reply Keith. I couldn't find a manual for a wiring diagram listed on site. Assuming it might show the harness, what feeds it if the option was added? I see 5 pins for wires? Can you steer me in a closer direction? Thanks again.

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      • #4
        Check your email for an old BM200 manual.

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        • #5
          Thank you Keith! Received and much appreciated. Also very impressed with the depth of information published in it. Hat's off to Hobart, that manual was a book of knowledge. Meat and potato stuff.
          As a matter of fact, I'm wrapping my head around the mention of Noodle Welding. Noted with reference as a slang term, I'm brain teasing when that bit of knowledge might be applied into use?
          Thank you, and Hobart for assistance.

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          • #6
            "noodle" was a very low voltage output that was intended for use in body panel repair.

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            • #7
              I was wondering if the reference was to a silicon or aluminum bronze wire rather then a solid steel wire in application? In my mind I was thinking not a short circuit but rather a continuous flow if that makes sense at all? Thanks.

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