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  • #16
    Thank you. I read the Esab article and it was helpful. What's confusing on the label above is is that most duty cycle specs mention duty cycle XY% at XYZAmps not Volts.

    Edit: So in clear conscience, I CAN add that overheat shutdowns rarely happen and that novice welders shouldn't be concerned much about it?

    Again, thanks for the time devoted!
    Last edited by Jeff Powell; 11-04-2019, 08:37 AM.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Jeff Powell View Post
      Thank you. I read the Esab article and it was helpful. What's confusing on the label above is is that most duty cycle specs mention duty cycle XY% at XYZAmps not Volts.

      Edit: So in clear conscience, I CAN add that overheat shutdowns rarely happen and that novice welders shouldn't be concerned much about it?

      Again, thanks for the time devoted!
      Nothing confusing there. since on a dual voltage machine, there are separate duty cycles and max amps for each voltage.

      The suggested statement is more true of SKILLED weldors, than novices. EG: I have an old Lincoln 125+ Mig , with CVC, that I run at top settings almost all the time, except for thin sheet metal, and it never overheats, because I stop before reaching that point and let it cool. A novice who does not know how a thermistor works probably couldn't do that.

      Also, that wouldn't make sense, since your first sentence is STILL "Overheating is a pretty common problem in welding...".

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      • #18
        Shoot... I missed that part. Edited now, thank you!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Jeff Powell View Post
          Shoot... I missed that part. Edited now, thank you!
          Don' stop now!

          ",,,built-in standardized solid contractor circuits..." What are these things????

          What is the difference between "...home use and garage use..." mig welders???

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          • #20
            Fixed as well, thanks!

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Jeff Powell View Post
              Fixed as well, thanks!
              There's more!

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              • #22
                Darn... Would it be too much to ask to point out the incorrect details?

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Jeff Powell View Post
                  Darn... Would it be too much to ask to point out the incorrect details?
                  Yes, it would be too much! Also, it would not fix the real problem, which is insufficient knowledge of some of the topics in which you are attempting to provide "expert" adivice.

                  For example, even your introduction needs work. You seem to be saying that your intent is to advise novices, but then, in the last sentence, you include pros. Also, while I agree with promotion of the IM230 as one of the best values for the money, I cannot agree with what you say about about some features (which show a lack of process experience).

                  I have some suggestions:

                  For your editing, go to the nearest high school that has a welding program, and offer to pay the welding instructor and an English teacher to edit your present material, and sit with them, while they do it.

                  Second, pick a knowledge source on welding, such as ESAB University, the Lincoln Foundation, TWI, or Welding Tips and Tricks, and BEFORE you write on any topic, make sure you look it up, and really understand it. Then, write your topic, without plagiarizing.

                  Finally, I did not make the posts you refer to in your PM, and, did not open the links, as a consequence.
                  Last edited by Northweldor; 11-09-2019, 08:18 AM.

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                  • #24
                    Thank you very much! I did research top welding sites and forums and watch a lot of YT videos by weld.com, welding tips and tricks and a few old timers.

                    I did not make up any of the details: they were all grounded on what's out there. I may have misinterpreted some of it as this is the learning process for me before the actual training in January.

                    Think about it this way: if any beginner would follow the same process, they would have the same data available.

                    I did my best and in hope that it would be of use to others who were less inclined on spending that many days going over page by page, and clip after clip.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Jeff Powell View Post
                      Thank you very much! I did research top welding sites and forums and watch a lot of YT videos by weld.com, welding tips and tricks and a few old timers.

                      I did not make up any of the details: they were all grounded on what's out there. I may have misinterpreted some of it as this is the learning process for me before the actual training in January.

                      Think about it this way: if any beginner would follow the same process, they would have the same data available.

                      I did my best and in hope that it would be of use to others who were less inclined on spending that many days going over page by page, and clip after clip.
                      Which, of the ones I listed, would you pick as your go-to source of welding knowledge?

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                      • #26
                        All 4 plus Hobart and Miller forums, weld.com, weldingweb.com and the well-rated welding YT channels. I never use only one source.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Jeff Powell View Post
                          All 4 plus Hobart and Miller forums, weld.com, weldingweb.com and the well-rated welding YT channels. I never use only one source.
                          That is a part of your problem. Very few of the YT videos can be trusted, even fewer of the forums, and most commercial sites, even Esab, Lincoln.and Miller, and the large European companies, have a bias toward their own products and processes. I would suggest a good general text on welding, such as Howard B Cary's Modern Welding Technology, and joining the old AWS forum and asking questions and researching there, there. would help. However, there is no substitute for experience, as you probably know.

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                          • #28

                            Jeff, I skimmed most of your entry. If you are aiming your blog at beginners, you probably should not indicate that the welder is good for building trailers and modifying trailer hitches even if it is. Those are critical welds and should not be attempted by someone without significantly more knowledge and experience than we find in a beginner. I have to agree with Northwelder's assessment of your 'writing about welding' skill level and with his advice. It would be reasonable for you to go out and get some (more) welding experience before you hold yourself out as an expert on the topic. One can muddle through a discussion of 'how many angels can dance on the head of a pin,' but technical discussions are different. This comment is not meant to force you away from this discussion board or from welding in general, but it does appear that you have bitten off more than you can chew at your present knowledge and skill levels. Hang in there. Don't give up. Get more knowledge and experience THEN write. Reading this discussion board and others like it for a couple of hours a night, several nights per week for a year or so will help tremendously. Take notes. Think and digest. Get a MIG welder, get several MIG welders, and do some welding. Again a couple of hours per day, a couple of times per week. Build some stuff (but not a trailer or a trailer hitch . . . yet). This will do wonders for your skill and knowledge levels. THEN start your blog. All best wishes, ~0le (Community College welding program graduate. Experienced Welder (all 5 major processes). Certified Welder. AWS Certified Welding Inspector)
                            "If a problem can't be solved, enlarge it." (The 34th president of the United States)

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