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  • New Hobart Owner

    I'm a new Hobart owner. Well new to Hobart anyway. The welder is an ancient CT-300. It's a beast. Came from a nuclear power plant. Still has the TVA property tags. Picked one wheel of my little tractor up off the ground when I got it off the trailer.

    I was able to get some operating information and wiring diagrams from Hobart. This helped me build a new jumper pin to take the place of the one missing. Also found some 20 year old wiring diagrams inside that someone had printed off.

    I've got it wired up now and have used it to do a little stick welding. It came with an air cooled torch, but I've not bought any shield gas. I'm going to have to weld some body work on my Jeep, so I'll wait until the last minute. I know wire would be easier, but I'm hard-headed.

    This is my first welder. I haven't done much welding since college.

    Any info on the big welder is appreciated. It's got a lot of flippy switches and knobs which I have no idea how to use. I know it's probably better off in a museum, but for $200, I couldn't resist.

  • #2
    Hope you have better luck than me with stick welding body work on your Jeep. I ended up buying a MIG welder. Actually 2 now. One for very thin wire and one for larger wire.
    Hobart beta-mig 2510 Mig welder
    Victor OA Welding/Cutting Rig
    Century 295 amp Stick welder bought 30+ years ago

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    • #3
      Hobart Cyber Tig. It does SMAW and GTAW. The nuclear power plant I work in utilizes 300 series stainless steel piping in its NSSS (Nuclear Steam Supply System). TIG welding is used for constructing the 304L and 316L piping systems.

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      • #4
        I plan to attempt to GTAW the sheet metal. Mostly filling holes. MIG would be better, I know. The SMAW I've been doing is on a busted lawnmower deck.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Balvar24 View Post
          I plan to attempt to GTAW the sheet metal. Mostly filling holes. MIG would be better, I know. The SMAW I've been doing is on a busted lawnmower deck.
          Personally, I find GTAW much superior to MIG on sheet metal. Greater control in heat application, speed of travel, and skills/applications like gas lenses, rocking the cup, and lay rod, etc.give options and control in GTAW that aren't available in GMAW. Except for speed and production, I intend to continue to improve my GTAW on sheet metal.

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