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Greetings From Michigan!

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  • Greetings From Michigan!

    Greeting all,
    I'm new to the forums, as well to the Hobart welders, however I am not so new to welding. I have had some college classes in welding, have done a good deal of welding in Mig, Tig, and ARC. I've built a few trailers, rebuilt a few and assisted on several project trailers of others I know. I've done a wide range of welding for work, I am a maintenance technician, with college courses aimed at industrial mechanics. Lots of brackets, tables, stands, of course all built in the fashion of overkill. :P

    I live in Michigan not far from Grand Rapids. I'm in my late 30's and pretty much just have myself! No wife/gf, no kids. Although I can act like a big kid! I'm not new to forums, but I am new to Hobart welders. I Just recently bought a Handler 140. It has some of the best ratings/reviews out there. I'm here to increase my knowledge and learn what I can.

    Thanks for taking the time to read this.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Unholy View Post
    Greeting all,
    I'm new to the forums, as well to the Hobart welders, however I am not so new to welding. I have had some college classes in welding, have done a good deal of welding in Mig, Tig, and ARC. I've built a few trailers, rebuilt a few and assisted on several project trailers of others I know. I've done a wide range of welding for work, I am a maintenance technician, with college courses aimed at industrial mechanics. Lots of brackets, tables, stands, of course all built in the fashion of overkill. :P

    I live in Michigan not far from Grand Rapids. I'm in my late 30's and pretty much just have myself! No wife/gf, no kids. Although I can act like a big kid! I'm not new to forums, but I am new to Hobart welders. I Just recently bought a Handler 140. It has some of the best ratings/reviews out there. I'm here to increase my knowledge and learn what I can.

    Thanks for taking the time to read this.
    Welcome, and glad to see you here.... I betting you will love the 140 as you gain more experience with it... I have the 140 and its probable best 120v machine out there for the price...

    Dale
    Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

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    • #3
      Welcome, and thanks for the introduction!

      Within its limits, the HH140 is a fine machine and very popular around here. I had the HH135 for quite some time.

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      • #4
        Welcome to the forum.
        Lincoln A/C 225
        Everlast PA 200

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        • #5
          I haven't had much time to burn with the welder yet. So many projects going on. Can you guys give me a idea of how long it goes doing 1/8 inch material as far as hitting duty cycle? I hear some say they can do a good deal of welding before then, others say they never see it. I assume that is because, adjust, tack, adjust, weld.. etc.. not tack all up and then weld everything. This is the first small machine I have used, I am use to the large monsters that seem to have no duty cycle almost. But I don't have the power, room, or cash for those machines.

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          • #6
            I do a lot of work with about 1/8th materials and have never had it hit the duty cycle, but then all my projects were small.... Not like running 3 feet of weld bead at one time...

            Dale
            Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

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            • #7
              To clarify, however, it doesn't shut off when it "hits the duty cycle." You are supposed to check the charts and do some figuring about how long your duty cycle should be (a percentage of every ten minutes). If your machine shuts off from thermal overload, it's because you've already gone way PAST its duty cycle. Don't trust a little thermal switch to save your machine.

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              • #8
                Also, you have to factor in the ambient conditions. Duty cycles are rated for 104 ºF. I sometimes use my machines in 120+ ambient, and that's not factoring in the temperature inside the machine if it's been in direct sunlight all day.

                Conversely, if you are using it in the middle of winter, you can be a lot more assertive with "pushing it."

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                • #9
                  Thanks for the info. I rarely weld in anything over 80 degrees, and almost always have the welder in the garage - out of sunlight. I know temperature effects things a good bit, so I do my best to account for that. I usually do not weld during summer. I prefer mid fall or mid spring. Winter is okay unless outside. On average it is about 55 or 60 in the garage I use (with heat). I also preheat just a little when using less powerful machines. it just helps a bit. I don't run long beads, they are a bad idea if they get to long. If they ever crack, it generally keeps following the weld. So I stitch weld. I also know just welding up everything all at once, always tends to pull things out of square. I work slowly at opposite ends, doing the same welds in sequence. I learned that the hard way. I did everything in one corner, than the other. The metal pulled itself out of square and the welds were not consistent because the metal got hotter and hotter in the area I was welding. I found a deal, $.85 a foot for 13GA steel 1.25 x 1.25 tubing, might be used for my first project!

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