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Stickmate Electrode Limitations ???

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  • Stickmate Electrode Limitations ???

    Found the statements below in the Electrode Chart section of the Stickmate spec sheet

    Not sure what Hobart means when they say "limitations with x/xx inch rods based on rod/amperage"

    Can someone please explain?

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Stickmate 160i
    120 V: 1/16–1/8 in. (some limitations with 3/32-inch rods and very limited with 1/8-inch rods based on rod/amperage)
    240 V: 1/16–5/32 in. (some limitations with 5/32-inch rods based on amperage)

    Stickmate 210i
    1/16–3/16 in. (some limitations with 3/16-inch rods based on amperage)

  • #2
    Originally posted by Rangerhgm View Post
    Found the statements below in the Electrode Chart section of the Stickmate spec sheet

    Not sure what Hobart means when they say "limitations with x/xx inch rods based on rod/amperage"

    Can someone please explain?

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Stickmate 160i
    120 V: 1/16–1/8 in. (some limitations with 3/32-inch rods and very limited with 1/8-inch rods based on rod/amperage)
    240 V: 1/16–5/32 in. (some limitations with 5/32-inch rods based on amperage)

    Stickmate 210i
    1/16–3/16 in. (some limitations with 3/16-inch rods based on amperage)


    You have 3 houses, one made of straw, one made of wood and one made of brick. Which one is easier to burn to the ground?

    You have a twig, a branch and a log, only one match. Which one will be easier to light on fire?

    Different rods have different coatings. Rods come in different sizes. On 120 you have a match. On 240 you have a lighter. Time to burn something. The statement eludes to coating and rod size, the current it takes to get it to melt.

    Comment


    • #3
      They are just pointing out what the chart should show you. A 160i can do 2065 A on 120 Volts. Look at the electrode size, type and recommended amperage. You might light up a 1/8" E6011, but it would be at the very bottom of the recommended range, if that. You might be able to use a 5/64" E7014.
      --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

      Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
      -------------------------

      Comment


      • #4
        Ahhhhh....OK, thanks
        Last edited by Rangerhgm; 05-12-2019, 12:36 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Rangerhgm View Post
          Ahhhhh....OK, thanks
          You know...this welding stuff is as simple or as complicated as you want to make it. I prefer simple. Less typing involved. For complicated I recommend a good book.

          So, in keeping it simple, 120V is a mouse. 240V is a rat. You have a wheel that turns and the question to ask, how fast will the mouse or the rat turn the wheel? Now that wheel, is it a big wheel or a little wheel? How many mice or rats will it take to turn the wheel? How long can they keep it up? And you might also ask, what shape are the mice or rats in to do the job? Well fed and fit, or starved and weak?

          But if you prefer complicated...electrode coatings and flux compositions, Amperage, Voltage and resistance, electrical currents and power source characteristics are a direction for further study. Your welcome.

          Comment


          • #6
            The same size electrodes can have different amperage needs for different types of coating. 6010/6011 electrodes need fewer amps than 7018 electrodes, so they can't just say what size you can run.

            Comment

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