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Anyone had experience with Kiswel 6013?

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  • Anyone had experience with Kiswel 6013?

    Anyone had experience with Kiswel 6013? I have been using Lincoln 3/32" and am pleased with its performance. I know Kiswel is a Chinese rod and am necessarily leery. But the low price for the Kiswel is attractive. Am concerned about moisture pickup during storage. Thanks, BobD

  • #2
    Originally posted by rodburner6 View Post
    Anyone had experience with Kiswel 6013? I have been using Lincoln 3/32" and am pleased with its performance. I know Kiswel is a Chinese rod and am necessarily leery. But the low price for the Kiswel is attractive. Am concerned about moisture pickup during storage. Thanks, BobD
    Most cellulose-based - flux rods contain a certain percentage of water in the flux which helps to form the rod's shielding cloud from the flux. If the rod is too dry or too wet, it will affect shielding. Most of the 60XX series are baked to about 150 degrees during manufacture, so the amount of water is small but crucial, and it is usually recommended by mfgs. that they be stored in air tight containers after opening, and this will usually suffice for most job time periods.

    If they are months old or longer, I would use them only on non-critical jobs, especially if they have been exposed to high heat, humidity, or direct moisture. There is no way to restore them to new condition, despite what you may have heard. Also, I have always found it better not to economize on electrodes, since they are really the cheapest factor in the welding process, and quality and consistency makes the job easier.

    Sorry, no experience with Kiswel.
    Last edited by Northweldor; 05-15-2018, 05:54 PM.

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    • #3
      Trick or treat?

      Trick...E6012,13,14
      are Rutile based not cellulose.
      Treat...
      Kiswel electrodes are manufactured to AWS specifications.

      Trick...There has been some sketchy stuff coming out of those Chinese manufactures.
      Treat...And some pretty darn good stuff as well.

      Trick... The AWS spec for the wires used is consistent with all 60psi series filler rods.
      Treat... While the primary coating ingredient is still a rutile based ingredient, it doesn't mean the manufacturer can't change quantities, other elements and quantities to enhance or adjust the effects during consumption.

      Trick...Is 60,000 psi in USA different from 60,000 psi in China?
      Treat...No. But the cost to manufacture probably is?

      Trick...A rock doesn't absorb moisture.
      Treat...Wood however will.

      Trick...If water turn to steam at 220 degrees f, then putting a sealed box in a rod oven set for that temp should create moisture in the box package?
      Treat... I doubt it? But spooky if it does?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by rodburner6 View Post
        Anyone had experience with Kiswel 6013? I have been using Lincoln 3/32" and am pleased with its performance. I know Kiswel is a Chinese rod and am necessarily leery. But the low price for the Kiswel is attractive. Am concerned about moisture pickup during storage. Thanks, BobD
        BobD:

        The poster above appears to be trying to point out that I should have discussed rutile rods, as well as cellulose in my post above, and he is quite correct, since you asked about a rutile rod (6013), Sloppy reading on my part.

        However, the only information I would add, is that rutile and iron powder electrodes can be rebaked under manufacturer's specs, if you have an oven.

        The rest of my post above still applies. since rutile and iron-powder electrodes still absorb moisture since their flux also contains cellulose and other organic compounds.

        The poster above continues with some kind of irrelevant speculation, but I would disregard whatever we both say and go directly to the manufacturer's specs. for complete clear instruction. Here is Lincoln's version:

        https://www.lincolnelectric.com/en-c...es-detail.aspx

        it is always wise to remember that economizing on the least expensive, but quite critical, consumable in the weld process is not the way to success.

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        • #5
          "5.6.3 Electrodes can be maintained for many months under proper storage at normal room temperatures with relative humidity at 50 percent or less, or in holding ovens. However, if the containers are damaged or the electrodes are improperly stored, their coverings may absorb excessive atmospheric moisture."

          Well BobD. I'm quoting AWS. The very people that set the bar. Now I'm not going to comment on the storage of E7018, but I'll discuss the blurb about no low hydrogen coatings with added highlights from it.
          - If exposed to humid air for long periods of time, stick electrodes from opened containers may pick up enough moisture to affect operating characteristics or weld quality. If moisture appears to be a problem, store electrodes from the opened containers in heated cabinets at 100 to 120°F (40 to 50°C). DO NOT use higher temperatures, particularly for electrodes from the "Fast Freeze" group.
          Some electrodes from wet containers or long exposure to high humidity can be re-dried. Adhere to the procedures in the following table for each type.

          I go out and buy milk it has a best before date. Depending on the temperature you keep your fridge, it may last longer or not as long in retaining freshness. You may drink from the container? Leave it out before putting it back? Heck, maybe the truck's refer was set too cool low enough in transport?

          But we were discussing rod storage and just how humid it is where you leave your rods and how they are stored when not in use? Well...I'm sure you'll figure it out? Common sense should be your guide from the information provided.

          On a side note...it's commonly believed that cellulose coating moisture is like the softness in a loaf of bread. It's not. It's the heat of the arc and it's reaction breaking down through chemical reaction of the organic cellulose structure. Releasing moisture is chemistry. So the amount of "moisture" in composition of Rutile coated, or iron powder type fluxes is minimal. But it's there. Hence less of a concern unless ambient air is extremely humid, or overly hot. Cellulose coated, while manufactured within specs 3 to 7 % moisture, typically tip out at 4%.

          I'm sure you'll figure out what to purchase however when choosing a E6013 electrode. My self, I'd try them, the Kiswel. You might find they run really well on AC if that's what you have for a power source? Buy a small batch and try them? Let us know. Good luck with that.

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