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  • Hobart Stickmate LX Questions

    Hi all,

    So I picked up one of these Hobart Stickmate LX 235 AC/160 AC/DC models in the classifieds. Owners stated the classic BS, used twice.. Anyway, I opened it to clean out the dust bunnies and saw some of wax on the wiring and transformer block... ect indicating to me he had ran it hot, no burn observed.

    Anyway, I'm upgrading the cord from that crappy 12/3 cable 50 amp 3 plug to a 6/3 SO 50 amp. The main switch is an 8AWG instead of a 6... Nice added touch.

    Anyway, I observed something. The 2 nuts holding the Stabilizer to the Transformer are loose and the Stabilizer rocks just a bit. Question is, are these nuts supposed to be loose?

  • #2
    Well I called the tech line and they say they should be tight.

    Comment


    • #3
      What's crappy about #12 cord (not a cable) on a machine with a 20% duty cycle? Millers and Lincolns have the same cord.

      There are a hundred thousand of these machines installed throughout the country, still going strong, powered by #12 wire; including in my shop.

      Comment


      • #4
        I understand the 20% duty cycle as being good enough, if you follow it. I'd rather instead have a much more durable cord with a 50 amp continuous rating. Besides, there' not much sheathing on the outside of that cord. Besides, I had to replace it due to someone melting a leg flat.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by hydrashocker View Post
          I understand the 20% duty cycle as being good enough, if you follow it. I'd rather instead have a much more durable cord with a 50 amp continuous rating. Besides, there' not much sheathing on the outside of that cord. Besides, I had to replace it due to someone melting a leg flat.
          A "20% duty cycle, if you follow it"?? Duty cycle is not a matter of choice, You "follow it" or your thermal protection and/or your machine will not last.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by hydrashocker View Post
            I understand the 20% duty cycle as being good enough, if you follow it. I'd rather instead have a much more durable cord with a 50 amp continuous rating. ...
            Then why did you buy a MACHINE with a 20% duty cycle if you don't want a cord with a 40% duty cycle?

            Then you come here so your first post is only to say the cord is crap because of its size.

            My Lincoln AC/DC tombstone has a #12 cord, too. Must be a conspiracy.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by hydrashocker View Post
              Hi all,

              So I picked up one of these Hobart Stickmate LX 235 AC/160 AC/DC models in the classifieds. Owners stated the classic BS, used twice.. Anyway, I opened it to clean out the dust bunnies and saw some of wax on the wiring and transformer block... ect indicating to me he had ran it hot, no burn observed.

              Anyway, I'm upgrading the cord from that crappy 12/3 cable 50 amp 3 plug to a 6/3 SO 50 amp. The main switch is an 8AWG instead of a 6... Nice added touch.

              Anyway, I observed something. The 2 nuts holding the Stabilizer to the Transformer are loose and the Stabilizer rocks just a bit. Question is, are these nuts supposed to be loose?
              he probably did not follow the 20% duty Cycle
              Ed Conley
              Screaming Broccoli, Inc
              http://www.screamingbroccoli.net/
              MM252
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              Miller Passport Plus, Spoolmate 100
              TA185
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              Miller 125c Plasma
              "Hold my beer while I try this!"

              Comment


              • #8
                I bought it used, as such what the previous owner did as far as maintenace I am unsure. If you bother to read my post you would know that.

                The cord needed replaced, I replaced it with a heavier duty cord. It got cleaned and lubricated now, and holds a great puddle which seems very smooth. Whether it helped or not who knows, I'd do it again to plug directly into the plug I installed for multiple use.

                As far as getting a larger duty cycle, I already have large diesel welders and migs. I particularly wanted a small stick AC/DC, that's why I bought this one one. Its my opinion that little hard burned cord was not the best, and it' your opinion that you don't agree with my assessment. Opinions are like rear ends, everyone' got one.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I would like to add; all of what I did was approved by Hobart and my electrician.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by hydrashocker View Post
                    I would like to add; all of what I did was approved by Hobart and my electrician.
                    Hobart: "Yes, sir, that machine is out of warranty, so go ahead."

                    Electrician: "I've got some leftover #6 on my truck; let's use it!"

                    We were just birddogging you and having fun because your first post here basically said the machine comes with a "crappy cord," not the you had gotten a machine with a damaged cord. We had just finished trying, in vain, to explain the entire concept of duty cycle to another newbie who pretends to be an "electrical engineer" from a liberal arts school and spews nonsense about the same thing.

                    "Best" includes size, weight, flexibility, cost, and other considerations in addition to ampacity which needs to at least meet duty cycle. All figured, a #12 cord is the best for that machine. I'm an electrician and can tell you that the vast majority of them do not work with these kinds of duty cycle considerations and don't even know there is a separate section in our codebook for it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Mac, aren't there exceptions to the exceptions in the code books that say something about no exceptions about ampacity on 10 gauge wires or less? Like "No Harry Homeowner exceptions for 30A and below"? Derating and rerating circuits are not for the feint-hearted. Especially if they are plugged in and not direct-wired with a cut-off. Electrically fine on a good day, just not idiot-proof.

                      Did I ever tell you about the time I came close to burning down my apartment building by throwing away some rags in the trash that had linseed oil on them?
                      --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

                      Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
                      -------------------------
                      DialArc 250 (1974), Idealarc 250 (1971), SyncroWave 250 w/Coolmate 3, SP-175+, TA 161STL,
                      Lincwelder AC180C (circa 1952), Victor & Smith's O/A, Dayton (Miller) spot welder, 1200 sq.ft. of garage filled with crap and a kid that can actually run the stuff +++

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by usmcpop View Post
                        Mac, aren't there exceptions to the exceptions in the code books that say something about no exceptions about ampacity on 10 gauge wires or less? Like "No Harry Homeowner exceptions for 30A and below"? ...
                        There are some complicated ones, yes, and for normal branch circuits there are fuse/breaker limitations even for calculated ampacities that are higher on most of the "smaller" wire sizes.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by usmcpop View Post
                          Mac, aren't there exceptions to the exceptions in the code books that say something about no exceptions about ampacity on 10 gauge wires or less? Like "No Harry Homeowner exceptions for 30A and below"? Derating and rerating circuits are not for the feint-hearted. Especially if they are plugged in and not direct-wired with a cut-off. Electrically fine on a good day, just not idiot-proof.

                          Did I ever tell you about the time I came close to burning down my apartment building by throwing away some rags in the trash that had linseed oil on them?
                          Seems to me that if some nut farmer is going to ignore all the cautions about duty cycle, ampacity rating, thermal overload, etc etc etc, then all bets are off – and if he doesn't set his superduper 6/3 cord ablaze, then he's going to set the transformer on fire, or leave his gasoline mower under the workbench where spatter sets it on fire ... or a thousand other things.

                          You can slather over ugly, but the stupid always comes shining through.

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