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  • Practicing Stick Welds....Help

    My son and I have been practicing our stick welding. We are both new to stick welding, we have been tig and mig welding for a couple years, but just started trying stick a few days ago. We are making progress but we still need lots of practice and work.


    Would like to hear some pointers/tips on what we maybe can do to make our welding better.




    Some 6013 slag curl...60 amps/Dig 30%/DC+


  • #2
    IF any of my welds looked that good I'd be a happy camper...errr Welder....

    Dale
    Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

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    • #3
      Some of them look a little tall. Experiment with your amperage and speed a little. In my opinion,until you burn through you have no idea what the upper amperage limit is for your welder on your power circuit.
      Blacksmith
      Stickmate LX AC/DC
      Big cheap (Chinese) Anvil
      Hand cranked coal forge
      Freon bottle propane forge
      HH 210 and bottle of C25

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      • #4
        I will give my own advice....I don't know if I could take it though. Slow down.

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        • #5
          when your slag comes off in one piece like that, you are generally headed in the right direction.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Goat Driver View Post
            My son and I have been practicing our stick welding. We are both new to stick welding, we have been tig and mig welding for a couple years, but just started trying stick a few days ago. We are making progress but we still need lots of practice and work.


            Would like to hear some pointers/tips on what we maybe can do to make our welding better.
            In order to save practice material, and get straighter and more consistent stringer beads, you can take four 6" pieces of 2"x3/8" bar, and tack them together so that the end profile is a 90 degree cross. You can then fill each of the four V's formed with a different rod (as you have been doing), blending beads together to form multi-pass V groove welds on all four sides.You can also vary rod sizes, and settings with each layer. (A 5/32 rod gives you a better chance to see what is happening in the puddle, and you also get practice in setting your machine). Frequent cooling is necessary, to keep experience reasonably realistic. This is an old apprentice training exercise, sometimes called the "Fiery Cross".

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            • #7
              Any chance

              Originally posted by Northweldor View Post
              In order to save practice material, and get straighter and more consistent stringer beads, you can take four 6" pieces of 2"x3/8" bar, and tack them together so that the end profile is a 90 degree cross. You can then fill each of the four V's formed with a different rod (as you have been doing), blending beads together to form multi-pass V groove welds on all four sides.You can also vary rod sizes, and settings with each layer. (A 5/32 rod gives you a better chance to see what is happening in the puddle, and you also get practice in setting your machine). Frequent cooling is necessary, to keep experience reasonably realistic. This is an old apprentice training exercise, sometimes called the "Fiery Cross".
              Can You draw a sketch of how the four pieces are laid out ? Thanks Tool

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              • #8
                Originally posted by toolaholic View Post
                Can You draw a sketch of how the four pieces are laid out ? Thanks Tool
                As the name suggests. (End View) = +

                If you tack corner to corner, edge to edge, you will end with a square cavity in the center that will aid in cooling.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Northweldor View Post
                  As the name suggests. (End View) = +

                  If you tack corner to corner, edge to edge, you will end with a square cavity in the center that will aid in cooling.
                  Thank You, that's clever. My welding school never did that. Tool

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                  • #10
                    Or just keep a bucket of water handy and give it a quick dunk once in a while------that's what we did in the local college welding classes I've taken. Knocks a lot of the heat out and dries fast and ready to weld again. Obviously, you wouldn't do this on a real project, but for practice stacking beads, it let's you keep going without overheating the piece. Make sure to pick it up and dunk it with your Welpers, NOT your hand! (not even with gloves on)

                    Something else you can do as practice (and I need to do this more myself!) is lay another piece on top of your practice piece and lay your bead an even distance from the edge (but not welding them together)-----makes you work on keeping your eyes open on where you're going and going straight. I know normally we have a joint to follow, but I still think it's a good exercise.
                    Last edited by MarkG; 08-14-2014, 09:10 AM.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by MarkG View Post
                      Or just keep a bucket of water handy and give it a quick dunk once in a while------that's what we did in the local college welding classes I've taken. Knocks a lot of the heat out and dries fast and ready to weld again. Obviously, you wouldn't do this on a real project, but for practice stacking beads, it let's you keep going without overheating the piece. Make sure to pick it up and dunk it with your Welpers, NOT your hand! (not even with gloves on)

                      Something else you can do as practice (and I need to do this more myself!) is lay another piece on top of your practice piece and lay your bead an even distance from the edge (but not welding them together)-----makes you work on keeping your eyes open on where you're going and going straight. I know normally we have a joint to follow, but I still think it's a good exercise.
                      The purpose of the cavity is to let the water get to the center of the assembly for better and quicker cooling. (The bucket of water is assumed).

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