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  • #31
    The only time you really need a rod oven is for low-hy code type work. If you are just welding your own stuff in your home shop then no.
    atlantarhinoplastycritic.com

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    • #32
      SidecarFlip and Ovens

      CAT has had a NEW line of On-Road Trucks out for at least 2 years now.

      As far as 7018, Drying is ALWAYS an ongoing debate.
      Its true that lots of Farmers/Hobbyist use non-Ovened 7018 as they are not doing Code compliant work.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by jamesfry View Post
        The only time you really need a rod oven is for low-hy code type work. If you are just welding your own stuff in your home shop then no.
        Wrong. Again, find a rod manufacturer or engineer anywhere in the world who agrees with you, and report back. Welding on any critical dynamically loaded structure, code or not, should not be done with "wet" rods, since weld quality will be compromised.

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        • #34
          This subject raises passions like the Red state/Blue state thing. No I'm not talking about Lincoln vs Miller....

          From what I've read, and please enlighten me if I'm getting it wrong, but you can only "see" hydrogen embrittlement defects on the surface when it's very serious since they tend to begin inside the weld and, maybe, propagate outwards. In other words, there is no way for us hobbyists to discern a problem until it's DefCon 4-serious. I have like many others, used 7018 rods that haven't been stored "properly" (NOT wet mind you) and notice the bead is more crack resistant than say, 6013 used on thicker metal. I'm not implying any "code-compliance" with that statement.

          And here is where the rod manufacturers are suspect in my alleged mind. Go to Lowes or Home Depot and grab a box of Lincoln 7018AC. Packed in a cardboard box with a crappy thin shrink-wrap that's often ripped or not even sealed at the ends. Plopped on the shelf for months before they're sold. How is that compliant? But Lincoln classifies them "lo-hy". It's a case of "do as I say, not as I do". Having said that, I try to stay away from welding stuff that has people on it or under it, and can't remember having a 7018 weld crack. And I've folded a few coupons over in a vice with nary a bad result. I do have two unopened cans of Atom Arc Acclaim sitting on the shelf. I would love to try them out but don't want to pop a fresh can unless it can be justified (and used up).

          I'm looking at this thread in the hope I can learn from it, so thanks in advance you all.
          CanoeCruiser
          Harris dual-stage O/A
          Lincoln AC/DC buzzbox
          Hobart IronMan 210
          Lincoln PowerMig 135
          Miller 3035 spoolgun
          Thermal Arc 185
          Thermadyne Cutmaster 52
          Angle grinders, vicegrips, the usual suspects
          Two hands, tired body, not enough time...

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          • #35
            Pop the cans! Use 'em!

            The Lincoln 7018 that I have says you can use them right out of the box, then they must go into an oven after 3 hours or some bs like that. This includes the ones in the paper box with the non sealing plastic wrap. Personally, I have an oven, but only use it when doing any type of work that requires it, or in any work where I may have to explain to some judge what process I used and why and how.
            Walker
            Chief slag chipper & floor sweeper
            Ironwood Artistic

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            • #36
              The easy solution for those who don't want to buy or maintain an oven is to estimate low-hy rod use into the job, and give all remaining rod to the customer. I no longer buy large quantities of any low-hy rod unless the job requires it, and never buy at hardware stores. For what it is worth, Lincoln now packages low-hy (and other rods) into 1 lb. packages, which are available, at greatly increased prices, at my lws. They report that they sell well to hobbyists.

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              • #37
                I quit maintaining a hot box. I do use a few lo hi but for single pass light sheet work, if I am doing something I am concerned about in the shop use wire feed.
                http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by canoecruiser View Post
                  This subject raises passions like the Red state/Blue state thing. No I'm not talking about Lincoln vs Miller....

                  From what I've read, and please enlighten me if I'm getting it wrong, but you can only "see" hydrogen embrittlement defects on the surface when it's very serious since they tend to begin inside the weld and, maybe, propagate outwards. In other words, there is no way for us hobbyists to discern a problem until it's DefCon 4-serious. I have like many others, used 7018 rods that haven't been stored "properly" (NOT wet mind you) and notice the bead is more crack resistant than say, 6013 used on thicker metal. I'm not implying any "code-compliance" with that statement.

                  And here is where the rod manufacturers are suspect in my alleged mind. Go to Lowes or Home Depot and grab a box of Lincoln 7018AC. Packed in a cardboard box with a crappy thin shrink-wrap that's often ripped or not even sealed at the ends. Plopped on the shelf for months before they're sold. How is that compliant? But Lincoln classifies them "lo-hy". It's a case of "do as I say, not as I do". Having said that, I try to stay away from welding stuff that has people on it or under it, and can't remember having a 7018 weld crack. And I've folded a few coupons over in a vice with nary a bad result. I do have two unopened cans of Atom Arc Acclaim sitting on the shelf. I would love to try them out but don't want to pop a fresh can unless it can be justified (and used up).

                  I'm looking at this thread in the hope I can learn from it, so thanks in advance you all.
                  Weld cracking, which can be from many causes besides hydrogen embrittlement, is a very complex subject, and what we are talking about here is only one way of possibly avoiding it by the complying with the proper handling of rod. Cracks from hydrogen may propagate as you describe, but they may also occur in the HAZ, the root, toe, etc., and may be transverse, longitudinal, or propagating in many directions. Many like to use 7018 rod because of the ease of use, good bead appearance, and easy flux removal, but completely ignore the fact that preheat and/or postheat might be required to avoid hydrogen cracking, as well as proper rod care. Cleaning is also a major factor too, since hydrocarbons are a major cause of embrittlement.
                  Here is a fairly good article (from Lincoln!) covering most major causes of cracking, but some aren't even completely understood yet, just as we don't fully understand plasma physics in the arc.

                  http://content.lincolnelectric.com/p...ldcracking.pdf

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                  • #39
                    (Quote edited for brevity)

                    That is an excellent description of the issues! Thanks for posting that. A lot of the indicated techniques I knew were useful, and that paper helps me understand the what and why behind it. An old dog learned something useful today.
                    CanoeCruiser
                    Harris dual-stage O/A
                    Lincoln AC/DC buzzbox
                    Hobart IronMan 210
                    Lincoln PowerMig 135
                    Miller 3035 spoolgun
                    Thermal Arc 185
                    Thermadyne Cutmaster 52
                    Angle grinders, vicegrips, the usual suspects
                    Two hands, tired body, not enough time...

                    Comment

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