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  • what about a rod oven

    to oven or not to oven
    what are you using
    what do you recommend
    how do you hit/overcome the redry temp of 662F that is supposed to be used on 7018

  • #2
    Originally posted by weld27 View Post
    to oven or not to oven
    what are you using
    what do you recommend
    how do you hit/overcome the redry temp of 662F that is supposed to be used on 7018
    Buy or make a heat-treat oven if you need to get that high. Rod ovens are meant to hold rods, not re-dry 7018s. I got a Phoenix Dry-Rod oven and it goes to 300 degrees.
    --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

    Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
    -------------------------

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    • #3
      Originally posted by weld27 View Post
      to oven or not to oven
      what are you using
      what do you recommend
      how do you hit/overcome the redry temp of 662F that is supposed to be used on 7018
      This is not a choice, unless you are using MR rods!
      This may have been part of your flux-removal problem. I assumed you were using an oven or fresh rods each shift.

      I don't use an oven, but all rods left at day's end, become the property of the customer, to be used for non- critical purposes. Most serious rig weldors have an oven on their rig when they are using low hydrogen.
      (usmcpop answered your redrying question)

      Here's what Lincoln says:
      "Do I need an oven to store low-hydrogen electrodes?

      All low hydrogen consumables must be dry to perform properly. Unopened Lincoln Electric hermetically sealed containers provide excellent protection in good storage conditions. Once cans are opened, they should be stored in a cabinet at 250º-300ºF (121º-149ºC).

      When the electrodes are exposed to the air, they will pickup moisture and should be redried. Electrodes exposed to the air for less than 1 week with no direct contact with water should be redried as follows:

      E7018: 1 hour at 650º-750ºF
      E8018, E9018, E10018, E11018: 1 hour at 700º-800ºF

      If the electrodes come in direct contact with water or have been exposed to high humidity, they should be predried for 1-2 hours at 180º-220ºF first before following the above redrying procedure.

      Standard EXX18 electrodes should be supplied to welders twice per shift. Low hydrogen electrodes with the suffix "MR™" have a moisture resistant coating and may be left out up to 9 hours or as specified by code requirements."
      Last edited by Northweldor; 04-13-2013, 06:50 PM.

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      • #4
        ovens

        excellent reply northwelder. Ive got two 50lb ovens and use them on and off different jobs that need to be used on. I made a larger oven out of sheet metal, insulation and a light bulb that works ok too.You maybe able to come up with a small refrigerator and make a cheap one ive seen it done a time or two.

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        • #5
          sounds like its time to get a vaccume packer

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          • #6
            I picked up an old toaster oven from a dumpster and thats what I use. I'm cheap and it works just fine.

            Not just for pop tarts....
            So little time...So many machine tools.........
            www.flipmeisters.com

            Miller, Hobart & Lincoln TIG/MIG/-
            Hypertherm Plasma (Thanks Jim)
            Plasma-Cam DHC (coming shortly)
            Harris OA
            Too many motorcycles.............-
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            • #7
              Originally posted by SidecarFlip View Post
              I picked up an old toaster oven from a dumpster and thats what I use. I'm cheap and it works just fine.

              Not just for pop tarts....
              i was wondering about one of those.

              i hadn't really givin an oven much thought to be quiet honest, never really had any welds that were that critical. when i was at the LWS thursday i ordered a 10# variable temp oven (140-300F?) its supposed to be made by inweld for i think $89 it should be here this friday. one other thought i had was the kitchen oven is kinda needing replaced, its good for 550F. how do you build a heat treat oven that will get that hot, is the temp controlled?
              thanks
              Jonathan

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              • #8
                You can get digital temp controllers pretty cheap through eBay. You can find sites detailing homemade heat treat ovens.

                http://www.machinistweb.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1343
                --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

                Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
                -------------------------

                Comment


                • #9
                  Not that this is a bad idea but why?
                  http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by weld27 View Post
                    sounds like its time to get a vaccume packer
                    This might work if you use it immediately on opening 50lb boxes and divided into amt. you can burn in a shift. But in a moist environment and critical application, the weld procedure might demand that rods be returned to the oven or discarded after only 2hrs. (although this is rare), so that's how long it takes to get them wet.

                    Have you been checking your welds for hydrogen cracking?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by usmcpop View Post
                      You can get digital temp controllers pretty cheap through eBay. You can find sites detailing homemade heat treat ovens.

                      http://www.machinistweb.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1343
                      thanks for the link i'm already seeing a new oven, i'm thinking like a 50'x50'x8' room

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Northweldor View Post
                        This might work if you use it immediately on opening 50lb boxes and divided into amt. you can burn in a shift. But in a moist environment and critical application, the weld procedure might demand that rods be returned to the oven or discarded after only 2hrs. (although this is rare), so that's how long it takes to get them wet.

                        Have you been checking your welds for hydrogen cracking?
                        no, how is this done? i didn't see any in the weld and its been cold now for 24+ hrs. to google we go
                        Last edited by weld27; 04-14-2013, 01:13 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by weld27 View Post
                          thanks for the link i'm already seeing a new oven, i'm thinking like a 50'x50'x8' room
                          You could probably rig up something with a multi-position switch. Have presets ranging from "heat sandwich" to "melt bulldozer".
                          --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

                          Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
                          -------------------------

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by usmcpop View Post
                            You could probably rig up something with a multi-position switch. Have presets ranging from "heat sandwich" to "melt bulldozer".
                            hot ham and cheese or fried CAT, we can do either

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by weld27 View Post
                              no, how is this done? i didn't see any in the weld and its been cold now for 24+ hrs. to google we go
                              Very hard to see, and even difficult for NDT, since they are often not on the surface, but if very bad, often can be heard as a series of pings as a pass is cooling after flux is removed, or obvious after the weld fails.

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