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  • 4043 aluminum rods

    Has anyone here had any experience us the 4043 aluminum rods on a stick welder, was thinking about getting some and trying them , just thought I would do a little trolling before I bought any before wasting my time and money...any input would be helpfull
    Thanks Tom
    Hobart LX 253 Stickmate AC/DC run With a 6500 Watt Powermate Generator
    PowerKraft 230 AC Welder
    Cutting Torch
    A Grinder or 3 and a Chop Saw
    Bunch of cheap Harbor freight Tools
    and A Partridge in a Pear Tree
    Jack of all Trades - Master of None
    Independently Poor
    Graduated 6 Grade (Magna Cum Laude)

  • #2
    Originally posted by Rockinptom View Post
    Has anyone here had any experience us the 4043 aluminum rods on a stick welder, was thinking about getting some and trying them , just thought I would do a little trolling before I bought any before wasting my time and money...any input would be helpfull
    Thanks Tom
    I have wasted my time and money, on several one-off applications, and eventually decided that porosity problems due to inadequate shielding, made stick welding the last resort process.

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    • #3
      AL stick rpds

      I have used aluminum stick rods with good success on 1/8" or greater thickness aluminum. DC + 75-100 amps or so depending on metal thickness. Takes a little practice, slag is difficult to remove. Rods MUST be fresh! Old AL rods' flux will absorb moisture and the rod become worthless. If the white flux is popping off the rod as you weld, the rod has too much moisture in it and will be impossible to weld with.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by jerryo View Post
        I have used aluminum stick rods with good success on 1/8" or greater thickness aluminum. DC + 75-100 amps or so depending on metal thickness. Takes a little practice, slag is difficult to remove. Rods MUST be fresh! Old AL rods' flux will absorb moisture and the rod become worthless. If the white flux is popping off the rod as you weld, the rod has too much moisture in it and will be impossible to weld with.
        So, what are the care instructions for these rods? Are they kept in a rod oven after opening, as all lohy rods are supposed to be kept? Are they kept up to a specific time, and when should they be discarded? Where did you get them, what brand and AWS classification? I assume "good success" means comparable to using MIG or TIG, and these would not be your "last resort"?

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        • #5
          I agree with the last resort. I used them alot 30 years ago to fix broken castings and they did work but move a head 30 years and i have a mig so they don't get used. If the flux falls from the rods they can still be used for gas welding so don't pitch them...Bob
          Bob Wright, Grandson of Tee Nee Boat Trailer Founder
          Metal Master Fab
          Salem, Ohio
          Birthplace of the Silver & Deming Drill
          http://www.ceilingtrains.com/
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sawking/
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbend10k/

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          • #6
            Thanks for the replys , i will have to get some and try them , would be great to know that I would be able to repair something that is aluminum if the need arises.
            Hobart LX 253 Stickmate AC/DC run With a 6500 Watt Powermate Generator
            PowerKraft 230 AC Welder
            Cutting Torch
            A Grinder or 3 and a Chop Saw
            Bunch of cheap Harbor freight Tools
            and A Partridge in a Pear Tree
            Jack of all Trades - Master of None
            Independently Poor
            Graduated 6 Grade (Magna Cum Laude)

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Rockinptom View Post
              Thanks for the replys , i will have to get some and try them , would be great to know that I would be able to repair something that is aluminum if the need arises.
              As long as the weld is not critical (dynamically loaded or structural)! In spite of what Jerryo said, I would rather use gas welding, rather than stick, if MIG and TIG are not available. Google The Tinman site for some background.

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              • #8
                I personally have never been impressed by aluminum smaw rods. I would personally use a spool gun before I would think about trying to use them. To many times grinding out aluminum smaw welds to reweld with tig after someone tried an initial repair. IMO

                Comment


                • #9
                  Al Rods

                  Originally posted by Northweldor View Post
                  So, what are the care instructions for these rods? Are they kept in a rod oven after opening, as all lohy rods are supposed to be kept? Are they kept up to a specific time, and when should they be discarded? Where did you get them, what brand and AWS classification? I assume "good success" means comparable to using MIG or TIG, and these would not be your "last resort"?
                  I first tried to weld with some Al rods about 12 years ago. The rods were in opened plastic packs of an unknown age. They were impossible to weld with, all the flux popped off. I later put these rods in the rod oven with 7018 rods overnight. The next day they were somewhat improved, but still the results were poor. However the improvement was enough to encourage me to buy a new pack of 1/8' 4043 rods at a later date and try them. These were the rods that I got some acceptable welds with on some 1/8" and 3/16 " sheet. You need to be a fairly accomplished stick welder to use them. Once you get the settings right I find them no more difficult to weld with than any other rod.
                  I got them at Tractor Supply, about $12 for about 10 Hobart rods -1/2 lb. I would say keep them wrapped up tightly in a plastic bag for storage, If they absorb too much moisture they won't work. Heating them is not answer for restoring them it seems. Maybe packing them in some sort of dessicant would work for long term storage. They will give decent welds, depending on your stick welding skill, but they are not TIG quality, at least in appearance.

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                  • #10
                    Well I bought some and tryed them today, I only used one and the test piece that I was working with , I took and buried it so no one will see it , with a backhoe 10 feet deep LOL, I will have to try again when I have nothing better to do, next time I will heat with a torch and try that .
                    Hobart LX 253 Stickmate AC/DC run With a 6500 Watt Powermate Generator
                    PowerKraft 230 AC Welder
                    Cutting Torch
                    A Grinder or 3 and a Chop Saw
                    Bunch of cheap Harbor freight Tools
                    and A Partridge in a Pear Tree
                    Jack of all Trades - Master of None
                    Independently Poor
                    Graduated 6 Grade (Magna Cum Laude)

                    Comment

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