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Adapter or Advice Needed - 220V dryer outlet to Buzz box welder

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  • Adapter or Advice Needed - 220V dryer outlet to Buzz box welder

    I've researched this question online and have read many contradictory comments. I've always found this board to be very helpful so here it goes.

    I acquired a 220v buzz box AC welder. It has a 3 prong plug. The "plan" was to make a 50' extension cord from the 220v dryer outlet (inside the house) to my work area outside. I don't weld alot so this should work when needed on a temporaty basis.

    Problem: Dryer has plug for 4 prongs and welder has 3 prong plug. I assume my options are.

    1. Find an adapter which allows me to make the connection. Do they even make these and from where?

    2. Make a cord with the 4 prong male on one end (dryer end) and a 3 prong female on the other (welder end). I have NO IDEA is this is safe or feasible given 2 hots, 1 neutral, 1 ground.....

    3. Butch up and pay an electrician to put in a box near my work area.

    4. Quit and take up knitting.

    I'm a newbie who is OK with his Handler 135 mig rig and who has used a crappy 110V stick welder before. My projects are getting bigger and I need the increased power of the stick welder. Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

    Larry in Houston

  • #2
    You'll have to make the Adapter, no problem.



    If it is 30amps you will not be able to run the Buzzbox at max because it could pull up to 50 amps.
    Last edited by Broccoli1; 07-02-2008, 03:08 PM.
    Ed Conley
    Screaming Broccoli, Inc
    http://www.screamingbroccoli.net/
    MM252
    MM211
    Miller Passport Plus, Spoolmate 100
    TA185
    SO 2020 Bender
    Miller 125c Plasma
    "Hold my beer while I try this!"

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    • #3
      Like this:

      Ed Conley
      Screaming Broccoli, Inc
      http://www.screamingbroccoli.net/
      MM252
      MM211
      Miller Passport Plus, Spoolmate 100
      TA185
      SO 2020 Bender
      Miller 125c Plasma
      "Hold my beer while I try this!"

      Comment


      • #4
        Good pic Ed. You can get a pigtail for dryers and put a recept on the end. My flavor would be to learn to put in a circuit, this is as simple as it gets.
        http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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        • #5
          Your dryer outlet is no doubt a NEMA 14-30R.

          If the welder plug has two parallel flat blades and one round prong, it's a NEMAE 6-50P; if it has three flat blades at angles, it's either a 10-30P or 10-50P. When you buy one, it comes with both 30-amp and 50-amp blades in the box - yop pick!

          Ed's drawing shows a 6-50R.

          Hank
          ...from the Gadget Garage
          MM 210 w/3035, BWE
          HH 210 w/DP 3035
          TA185TSW
          Victor O/A "J" series, SuperRange
          Avatar courtesy of Bob Sigmon...

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          • #6
            The welder has 2 parallel flat blades and a round prong (as shown in the diagram above). Thanks to everyone for the help and your patience with new folks.

            Larry

            Comment


            • #7
              Newbie Post

              I have been reading posts for a while, and wanted to join this conversation.

              I too have just purchased an old Lincoln Electric 225 Volt AC Arc Welder. The guy who had it evidently swapped the plug out to a 3 prong plug (2 slanted and 1 straight blade). I also was going to make an extension cord for this to connect to my dryer outlet, which is a new 14-30R, but didn't know how to go from 4 wires to only 3.

              I opted for just buying a 20' length of 10/4 wire from the big box, connecting this to a 14-30P, to plug into the dryer outlet, and removing the 6' dryer cord extension that was added to the end of the welder supply cord.

              What I found was that the welder power supply cord only has 3 wires too, a black, a white, and a green. I wasn't sure how to connect the 10/4 wire to the 3 wires from the welder.

              I connected the red and black in the 10/4 together, as the two hot wires and then connected these to the single black wire from the welder, then connected green to green and white to white, as they matched up.

              I haven't plugged it in yet, as I was unsure if this is right or not. Did I do this right, or do I have a disaster waiting to happen?

              I know this is only a 30 amp outlet for the dryer, and that I can't run at full voltage. I'm also going to have an electrician come out and set a 50 amp oulet next to my panel in the garage, to make it all right, I just wanted to try the welder out first.

              When the 50 amp oulet is installed all I have to do is swap the L shaped white blade for a straight white blade that came in the package.

              Thanks to all for their posts and I look forward to the advice.

              Jim
              Last edited by CUTiger; 07-04-2008, 01:25 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by CUTiger View Post
                I connected the red and black in the 10/4 together, as the two hot wires and then connected these to the single black wire from the welder, then connected green to green and white to white, as they matched up.

                I haven't plugged it in yet, as I was unsure if this is right or not. Did I do this right, or do I have a disaster waiting to happen?
                Jim, Ed drew a picture in post number 3 above about how to do exactly this.

                You have wired yours wrong. A 240V single phase circuit has two hot legs and a ground. Period. A 120/240 dryer or range circuit has two hots, a neutral, and a ground. The neutral is not used in a 240V circuit.

                Red is hot, black is hot, green is ground. Tape off the white and leave it unattached.
                Last edited by Zrexxer; 07-04-2008, 02:19 PM.
                Trailblazer 302 * Millermatic 212 * Syncrowave 180SD * X-Treme 12VS Feeder * Spoolmate 3035
                Thermal Dynamics Cutmaster 52 Plasma * Lincoln 175 MIG

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                Hobart HH 125EZ


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                • #9
                  Originally posted by CUTiger View Post
                  ....I connected the red and black in the 10/4 together, as the two hot wires and then connected these to the single black wire from the welder, then connected green to green and white to white, as they matched up.

                  I haven't plugged it in yet, ....
                  DON'T PLUG IT IN!

                  You have wired a dead short across the 240V line by connecting the red and black together. If you plug that in, you'll make the blue fire!

                  Look at post 3, and ignore the white (neutral) wire in your setup completlely.

                  Hank
                  ...from the Gadget Garage
                  MM 210 w/3035, BWE
                  HH 210 w/DP 3035
                  TA185TSW
                  Victor O/A "J" series, SuperRange
                  Avatar courtesy of Bob Sigmon...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    What the last two posters said!

                    In typical residental wiring you have a 240v AC voltage with a center tap that is your neutral. From either of the hot legs to neutral you get 120V, which is what most of your outlets are. If you go from one hot leg to the other, you get 240V.

                    Typical color coding for a 4-wire cord for 240v is red one hot leg, black the other hot leg, white neutral, and green ground. This allows for devices that run on both 120 and 240 like a dryer or range with electronic controls.

                    Hooking the red and black wires together creats a dead short over the 240v circuit and at best will blow the breaker, at worst could start a fire or cause injury.

                    In a 3-wire 240v cord, you have black, white and green. In this case, one hot leg is attached to black, one to white, and the ground to green. 240v welders typically use 3 wires because the 120v tap isn't useful to them.

                    Stated the simplest, you don't use the neutral at the 4-wire outlet at all, just the two hots and the ground. Like the picture above shows, with no connection to the neutral.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by CUTiger View Post
                      When the 50 amp oulet is installed all I have to do is swap the L shaped white blade for a straight white blade that came in the package.

                      Thanks to all for their posts and I look forward to the advice.

                      Jim
                      One more thing Jim- that cord should not be used on the new 50amp Outlet as 10g is only rated up to 30amps.
                      Ed Conley
                      Screaming Broccoli, Inc
                      http://www.screamingbroccoli.net/
                      MM252
                      MM211
                      Miller Passport Plus, Spoolmate 100
                      TA185
                      SO 2020 Bender
                      Miller 125c Plasma
                      "Hold my beer while I try this!"

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Excellent! Thanks for the advice. I thought I had something wrong, which is why I didn't plug it in. Good thing. Thanks.

                        Jim

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                        • #13
                          One more thing Jim- that cord should not be used on the new 50amp Outlet as 10g is only rated up to 30amps.
                          Ed, for this welding machine the 10 is fine on a 50A circuit.
                          http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Sberry View Post
                            Ed, for this welding machine the 10 is fine on a 50A circuit.
                            Good to know- I thought those Buzzboxes pulled more juice.

                            ...and good for him as he can still use the Cord
                            Ed Conley
                            Screaming Broccoli, Inc
                            http://www.screamingbroccoli.net/
                            MM252
                            MM211
                            Miller Passport Plus, Spoolmate 100
                            TA185
                            SO 2020 Bender
                            Miller 125c Plasma
                            "Hold my beer while I try this!"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              They do pull more, about 40-45A depending on how zippy the incoming service is. They are only supposed to be running 20% of the time though and by the letter of the code it could actually be number 12 if its single circuit in pipe with a 50A. Not many will advocate it or think this is a good idea though. When these machines first became popular they install them by the gods all across the country in garages, 10 wire from the 60 mains sometimes even but ideally thru the range fuses at 50A with 10 wire. Still see them on old installs, a piece of 10 cable a few feet long next to the entrance panel where they sat the welder.
                              http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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