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Oxygen and acetylene tourch

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  • Oxygen and acetylene tourch

    I first off I just got what I thinks is a good deal on a set of Craftsman oxygen model 624.54370 and acetylene model 624.54380 got them both for 15 dollars on let go. The lady said they belonged to her dad that passed away. She said that they had need sitting a while. So I was thinking should I rebuild them.? And right now I have a portable small tanks. I want to get bigger tanks. Anyone have a suggestion on what size. Just need regular size tanks not huge ones.

  • #2
    I have a 55 cu-ft oxygen and "B" acetylene, and consider them ok for occasional use.... IT all depend on your useage on what size to get and how often you need to get refills....

    Dale
    "Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson..

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    • #3
      Knowing nothing about what you are doing, I can't give much advice as to how to upgrade your equipment, except maybe to just use it as is and then see if anything is lacking. Are you talking about rebuilding the regulators? Have you tried to use them first?

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      • #4
        A common pair of cylinders is a 92 cubic foot oxygen and a 75 cubic foot acetylene. These are roughly the same size and are light enough to be quite portable. They are what many HVAC installers use.

        The only use for acetylene IMO is for gas welding. Propane can be used for cutting, heating and brazing jobs and it's at least 90% cheaper. I own a propane cylinder that's tall and skinny like a regular welding gas cylinder so it fits in a cart. My local welding stores have them so I can swap them when they get empty. You can use the same regulator but will need different cutting tips for propane. The heating tips usually work but rosebud heating tips are usually gas specific.

        Some guys will point out that it takes two oxygen molecules to one acetylene molecule so they say your oxygen cylinder should be twice the size of your acetylene cylinder. Presumably that would allow the cylinders to be empty at the same time, saving you trips to the welding supply. I find this argument to be weak, but then I have many local welding supply stores to choose from. Besides, I often use one oxygen cylinder with either acetylene or propane, swapping bottles and hoses around as necessary. So they wouldn't necessarily run out at the same time anyway.

        Finally, if you do decide to go with an acetylene cylinder, be wary of the tiny ones. There is an industry rule of thumb that says you can not withdraw more than 1/7th (nowadays you will see 1/10th too) of the volume of an acetylene cylinder per hour. For a 75 cubic foot cylinder, that would limit you to about 10 cfm max draw rate. If you look at tip charts you will see the withdrawal rate for various tips. You can't use a rosebud with a small cylinder.
        Get actual tip charts. These days such information is readily available on the web.

        metalmagpie

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        • #5
          Originally posted by metalmagpie View Post
          A common pair of cylinders is a 92 cubic foot oxygen and a 75 cubic foot acetylene. These are roughly the same size and are light enough to be quite portable. They are what many HVAC installers use
          ...
          Some guys will point out that it takes two oxygen molecules to one acetylene molecule so they say your oxygen cylinder should be twice the size of your acetylene cylinder. ...
          As a professional HVAC installer, everyone I know in this business is using much smaller outfits, usually a 20 cu ft oxygen cylinder and a matching MC size acetylene cylinder. Unless getting this exchanged at a wholesale house designed for plumbers or the HVAC trade, the prices are usually much higher per cubic foot of gas, and I wouldn't recommend them even if they were able to keep up with the work.

          Oxygen is stored in a high-pressure cylinder at over 2000 psi.
          Acetylene is dissolved in acetone in a relatively low-pressure (usu less than 500 psi) cylinder with a matrix in it. So there is no simple 2-to-1 math involved in this one. It does work out that the cylinders designed to work together are roughly close in size.
          Last edited by MAC702; 12-05-2020, 08:54 PM.

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          • #6

            Mikey, Welcome to this discussion board. There are a lot of very smart, intelligent people who read and post here. Although I would not discard or trade in your small ones, I agree with your desire for larger cylinders for oxygen and acetylene. Depending on your gas usage, in the long run the cost will be lower. I'd suggest that you get the largest ones that your local welding supplier will sell you outright and that you are capable of handling. When I bought mine back in the early 1970s, it was called "lease for life," but things have loosened up since then. Save the receipt so you can prove ownership if you ever need to. I never have, but you never know. If you have several local welding supply stores in your area, shop around; cylinders are a fairly large purchase and on-going expense. The largest oxygen that my local Praxair, 2 miles from my home shop, will sell is 154 cubic feet. A full one weighs 92 pounds. I would suggest that you make the cylinder purchase from the store that will be doing the "filling" rather than shopping over the internet for a GREAT price for a cylinder that your local store won't touch.

            Metalmagpie has a good point about using acetylene only for welding and using propane for cutting, heating, and brazing. Right now, oxyacetylene welding is my go-to process for 1/8" and thinner mild steel. I find that being able to add the filler metal separately from the heat allows me to do a much better job. Plus, it keeps my TIG chops together. ~0le
            "If a problem can't be solved, enlarge it." (The 34th president of the United States)

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            • #7
              Make secure copies of any receipts for tanks...... I lost the receipts for my purchases Oxy. and Acet. tanks years ago so I have no proof of ownership if challenged....And the C25 tank I bought about 7 years ago, guess what, the print through carbon copy style receipt is fades to where its not readable,. should have run it through a copy machine...

              Dale
              Last edited by Dale M.; 12-13-2020, 08:25 PM.
              "Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson..

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              • #8
                I've never been challenged on a cylinder exchange, and have exchanged cylinders at several different places in both Las Vegas, NV, and Sacramento, CA. If the collar of the cylinder isn't embossed with an active company's name, it gets no questions. I've never bought a cylinder from a store, either.

                I've heard things may be different in other parts of the country.

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                • #9
                  I need to get a larger gas bottle, a 140 wont run bigger tips especially if they are getting lower. Personally although I have done a lot of work from 80 cf oxy the bigger bottles are way better and in todays world can be found at great prices. Spares are good, a guy doesnt have to bolt to the store every time one gets close to empty.
                  http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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                  • #10
                    I went with a 125cu-ft when I bought my C25 bottle for my HH140... Went to gas dock and dock rat said "we are out of 125's, take this 175"..... Been exchanging the 175 ever since....

                    Did first major welding project for this year in last few days... Bottle is down to about 200psi, and still delivering ok...

                    Dale
                    "Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson..

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                    • #11
                      Sears Craftsman code 624.xxxxx was made by Harris.
                      --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

                      Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
                      -------------------------

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