Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

ag mech torch

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • ag mech torch

    today in ag class we was learning how to use the torch but we was just learning how to cut it on well this one kid does it and not to long after he gets it started the regulator spikes on both the acetylene and the oxygen and starts making a loud high pitched noise so i'm curious on what happen can anyone tell me cause the Ag teacher didn't tell us anything all he did when that happen was cut the valves off and it stopped so i'm just wondering why it did that.

  • #2
    Blown diaphragms????????

    Comment


    • #3
      You had a minor flash black from my sitting position. Torch squealing like a pig is a good indicator. Means it's burning inside the tip, starving for oxygen to complete combustion. In a nut shell what most likely happened is the tip got hot, flame blew out, separated but still hot enough to keep the gas burning looking for a source to further combustion, usually in the lower pressure line. Close the valve and flame goes out being starved of fuel or the increaser of combustion which is oxygen.

      What you have to do is ask him...Hey Mister, what the heck was that and can you explain it any better then the old guy?

      Comment


      • #4
        ok thanks man manny thanks

        Comment


        • #5
          Glad I could help. You have any more questions, step up to the mic and speak em.
          Click image for larger version

Name:	705px-Gas_welding_a_joint_in_a_line_of_spiral_pipe_at_the_TVA's_new_Douglas_Dam_on_the_French_Broad_River,_Tenn.jpg
Views:	45
Size:	90.4 KB
ID:	708140

          Comment


          • #6
            I'll wait until there is some punctuation in the question, so I don't have to struggle to read it. Capitalization would just be a bonus to make it even easier to read. Put some effort into the question and you will get more people to read it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by tylercombs785 View Post
              today in ag class we was learning how to use the torch but we was just learning how to cut it on well this one kid does it and not to long after he gets it started the regulator spikes on both the acetylene and the oxygen and starts making a loud high pitched noise so i'm curious on what happen can anyone tell me cause the Ag teacher didn't tell us anything all he did when that happen was cut the valves off and it stopped so i'm just wondering why it did that.
              What happened is properly called a "burn-back", but if allowed to go on long enough to damage equipment, then it is a flash-back. There are many causes, and you don't say whether this was a cutting or welding torch.

              Your instructor seems incompetent in QA.

              Comment


              • #8
                Who's the old guy now. lol.


                agriculture mechanic torch question

                Today, 05:05 PM





                Today in ag class we was learning how to use the torch. We was just learning how to cut it on. Well this one kid does it and not to long after he gets it started the regulator spikes on both the acetylene and the oxygen and starts making a loud high pitched noise. So i'm curious on what happen? Can anyone tell me cause the Ag teacher didn't tell us anything. All he did when that happen was cut the valves off and it stopped so i'm just wondering why it did that?

                I took the liberty to add some periods, commas, and question marks. Slow night and all I figured what the heck.

                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ibbqPMR1sYU

                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9adOLZaP7SA

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm with Northweldor. Like Sam, my first thought was a blown diaphragm, but as soon as I saw it was both regulators at the same time, then we know it's a burn-back. Any student should have known what to do, because the possibility and remediation should have been explained before anyone was allowed to use the equipment. An instructor should have been able to say what it was, and use the teachable moment to fully explain it. Then again, he should have known how to set up the equipment to greatly minimize the risk. Ask him to show you the check valves or flash-back arresters in the setup.

                  Expecting a question to be clearly written, so the dozens to hundreds of people that will read it can do so quickly and understand it the first time, has nothing to do with being old and everything to do with no desire to put up with the bull**** "education" our country is producing these days. The alternative is just to ignore the question completely; and then people wonder why no one experienced enough to respond bothers to do so. For some reason, even though every computer has a spellchecker, we let that slide, but proper punctuation and capitalization make things much more clear and quickly read. An extra minute to properly write the question saves extra minutes for EVERY person that attempts to read it. I have better things to do, and will. I took the time to point it out, and now to explain it further, because this, too, is an investment, and I hope pays off for the OP later. And now that he's a member here, I hope he continues to participate.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by MAC702 View Post
                    I'm with Northweldor. Like Sam, my first thought was a blown diaphragm, but as soon as I saw it was both regulators at the same time, then we know it's a burn-back. Any student should have known what to do, because the possibility and remediation should have been explained before anyone was allowed to use the equipment. An instructor should have been able to say what it was, and use the teachable moment to fully explain it. Then again, he should have known how to set up the equipment to greatly minimize the risk. Ask him to show you the check valves or flash-back arresters in the setup.

                    Expecting a question to be clearly written, so the dozens to hundreds of people that will read it can do so quickly and understand it the first time, has nothing to do with being old and everything to do with no desire to put up with the bull**** "education" our country is producing these days. The alternative is just to ignore the question completely; and then people wonder why no one experienced enough to respond bothers to do so. For some reason, even though every computer has a spellchecker, we let that slide, but proper punctuation and capitalization make things much more clear and quickly read. An extra minute to properly write the question saves extra minutes for EVERY person that attempts to read it. I have better things to do, and will. I took the time to point it out, and now to explain it further, because this, too, is an investment, and I hope pays off for the OP later. And now that he's a member here, I hope he continues to participate.
                    Exactly...... Computers and internet has created a whole generation or maybe two or three that seems to have stopped or reduce the level of intelligent exchange considerably....Our School systems are failing because it is now run by people whose early education failed them and they are clueless as what to teach and how to teach it.....

                    Dale
                    "Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson..

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_7333.JPG
Views:	43
Size:	475.6 KB
ID:	708153 "Dozens of hundreds" eh. Hmm? I wonder where they're hiding? Could be they fear the grammar police and remain in hiding for good reason? Not me however.

                      Not to be a stickler, AWS Welding Handbook Volume 9, the term "Burn Back" is a non standard term. Flash back or back fire. Burn back, Isn't listed in the index or mentioned as a term of use to describe the condition mentioned, although...if your gas supply is low, flame is receding, I guess you could say, it's burning back?

                      I mentioned that just incase there is a test, picking the best answer usually scores the point. Call it what you will, If I hear the term "burn back" I think a fused GMAW wire into or on to the contact tip?




                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Sorry about my punctuation always been bad about that

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X