Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

I'm new here but have been around a while, have a question for the old timers

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • I'm new here but have been around a while, have a question for the old timers

    Howdy,
    I have a question concerning the age and quality of a set of assumed old Oxweld gauges. At least I assume they are old but I know they are Oxweld.

    Here are some pictures, they are big and heavy gauges>>









    Any info on these would be appreciated. Such as how big of tanks would be required especially. I have the w-17 torch assembly I got with them too.
    Last edited by Greybeard; 06-03-2014, 06:08 PM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Greybeard View Post
    Howdy,
    I have a question concerning the age and quality of a set of assumed old Oxweld gauges. At least I assume they are old but I know they are Oxweld.

    Here are some pictures, they are big and heavy gauges>>
    They are good quality heavy duty regulators, and appear to be very well looked after. My only concern would be whether the diaphragms have deteriorated with age. You do not need larger bottles, since all but the smallest sizes use the same fittings. I would put them on a set of 80cf or larger bottles and test them out, using proper balancing procedures.

    You may find the regulators may not respond as well as lighter duty regulators at low welding pressures, but should be good at higher pressures Also, you should add a pair of flash-back arrestors when you put them in use.

    Torch and tips appear to be barely used. If you do need parts, Esab has taken over all Union Carbide, Linde, and Oxweld products.
    Last edited by Northweldor; 06-04-2014, 07:58 AM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Sort of odd configuration on acetylene regulator...

      Dale
      Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Dale M. View Post
        Sort of odd configuration on acetylene regulator...

        Dale
        You mean the gauges facing backward. I guess that's where they ended up leak-proof. i would leave them too, rather than stretch the threads with another 1/2 turn.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks!

          I bought these about 12 years ago and have never used them. They were pre-owned but the man that bought them for his job died before getting to use them I guess. At least that is the story I got from the guy I bought them from who told me they were his neighbors. I had no reason at the time to not believe him although I only knew him as an employee of a subcontractor at work.

          Anyway, I'm now in need of tanks to use them since my workplace closed the doors and I don't have access to the tools at work anymore.

          Due to the size of this outfit I was assuming it was heavy duty and because I was told the man that owned them worked in the casting plant at Deere and Co. as a repairer of cast parts.

          Most of the tips are brand new but the cutting head is re-manufactured with no brand name on it. The mixing handle is an Oxweld w-17.

          I have two sets of flashback arrestors to use with it. Are they better at the handle or the regulators? The torches at work were both and I'm no expert; the vast majority of my 23 years of experience with o/a was cutting salvage metals when we destructed something.

          Northwelder mentioned to use proper balancing techniques, what does that mean? Just ensuring the flame is set is right or something a bit more mystical? Again, the vast majority of use this torch will see is cutting and heating. I've tried welding with flame before and every time it was a dismal failure. I'm much better at taking metal apart than I am at putting it back together.

          About the gauges being backwards on the acetylene side, I can't give a definitive answer but the mechanic at my job (who was the best fabricator I've ever seen) put the gauges at work on the acetylene backwards also. My suspicion was he believed in old wives tales so this was one. He believed if the gauge ever let go when the tank was opened he wanted the handle facing away from him. I didn't point out the obvious as I recall.
          Last edited by Greybeard; 06-04-2014, 12:51 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Greybeard View Post
            Thanks!

            I bought these about 12 years ago and have never used them. They were pre-owned but the man that bought them for his job died before getting to use them I guess. At least that is the story I got from the guy I bought them from who told me they were his neighbors. I had no reason at the time to not believe him although I only knew him as an employee of a subcontractor at work.

            Anyway, I'm now in need of tanks to use them since my workplace closed the doors and I don't have access to the tools at work anymore.

            Due to the size of this outfit I was assuming it was heavy duty and because I was told the man that owned them worked in the casting plant at Deere and Co. as a repairer of cast parts.

            Most of the tips are brand new but the cutting head is re-manufactured with no brand name on it. The mixing handle is an Oxweld w-17.

            I have two sets of flashback arrestors to use with it. Are they better at the handle or the regulators? The torches at work were both and I'm no expert; the vast majority of my 23 years of experience with o/a was cutting salvage metals when we destructed something.

            Northwelder mentioned to use proper balancing techniques, what does that mean? Just ensuring the flame is set is right or something a bit more mystical? Again, the vast majority of use this torch will see is cutting and heating. I've tried welding with flame before and every time it was a dismal failure. I'm much better at taking metal apart than I am at putting it back together.

            About the gauges being backwards on the acetylene side, I can't give a definitive answer but the mechanic at my job (who was the best fabricator I've ever seen) put the gauges at work on the acetylene backwards also. My suspicion was he believed in old wives tales so this was one. He believed if the gauge ever let go when the tank was opened he wanted the handle facing away from him. I didn't point out the obvious as I recall.
            FB arrestors can be installed at both the regulator and the torch (watch gas flow direction), but two sets may cause problems if they have unequal spring pressures, and torch sets make the torch heavier. If you just use one set, they should be at the regulator, to protect the most expensive part.

            For balancing procedure, look up "OA Torch Setting", with the search function. (It seems like a lot of trouble at first, but, this tests the equipment for proper operation every time you use it, and also, does away with pressure charts for heating, brazing, and welding operations).

            The backward guages were popular back in the day, with the old-style acetylene bottles with no safety caps and removable valve handles. With the valve outlet vertical, and having to position the regulator to clear the valve handle, it often made no difference which way they were facing. (These bottles are still in use in the cylinder exchanges for smaller acetylene bottles).

            Comment


            • #7
              Well Speedy here is back! I finally got around to getting some tanks to use. Being in college slows things down considerably, and since at my age I'm slowing down anyway that makes most snails annoying they are so fast.

              I got a lifetime rental on the tanks, I guess this is commonplace? It's not terrible that is for sure, it was the same price as buying the tanks however, so it just relieves me of the maintenance costs.

              As I was fitting it all together I noticed that I had two sets of check-valves and no flashback arrestors. Bummer, another trip to town...

              When I bought the tanks I found out the retailer was an Esab distributor and also rebuilds gauges, they looked at my set and gave me an insurance estimate for coverage at just over a grand for replacement costs....

              I have looked on ebaiter and found everything for little or nothing, so I guess torch kits don't hold their values very good? No matter.

              One question, flashback arrestor goes next to regulators and check-valves go next to torch correct? If I have all this straight the check-valve is a reverse flow preventer that stops the flow of the high pressure o2 from going back up the fuel hose assuming there is working pressure in both hoses and it also prevents either higher pressure gas from going up the other hose in case one tank loses pressure before the other. Is my mud clear?

              I have worked with oxy-fuel for mostly cutting and demo work on bridges and such for 30 years and never gave these two devices a second thought. However, I was never formally or even informally trained. I have had many (thousands upon thousands?) of pops and hisses during cutting or heating and never knew what they meant...ignorance is bliss as you know. I've had to drop the torch a few times because it started glowing in my hand...yup, I'm stupid...

              I know the equipment that my company supplied had these devices on them, but that was the extent of it. Maybe my luck runneth over? (or out?) Anyway, I don't have the luxury of company supplied insurance anymore so I need to set it correctly and maintain it the same way this go-round.

              No hurry, I do things in time, I have a few days off work and school to hang out around the house and catch up on the 'list' of things that needed done last winter....
              Last edited by Greybeard; 12-24-2014, 10:13 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Greybeard View Post

                When I bought the tanks I found out the retailer was an Esab distributor and also rebuilds gauges, they looked at my set and gave me an insurance estimate for coverage at just over a grand for replacement costs....

                I have looked on ebaiter and found everything for little or nothing, so I guess torch kits don't hold their values very good? No matter.

                One question, flashback arrestor goes next to regulators and check-valves go next to torch correct? If I have all this straight the check-valve is a reverse flow preventer that stops the flow of the high pressure o2 from going back up the fuel hose assuming there is working pressure in both hoses and it also prevents either higher pressure gas from going up the other hose in case one tank loses pressure before the other. Is my mud clear?

                I have worked with oxy-fuel for mostly cutting and demo work on bridges and such for 30 years and never gave these two devices a second thought. However, I was never formally or even informally trained. I have had many (thousands upon thousands?) of pops and hisses during cutting or heating and never knew what they meant...ignorance is bliss as you know. I've had to drop the torch a few times because it started glowing in my hand...yup, I'm stupid...

                I know the equipment that my company supplied had these devices on them, but that was the extent of it. Maybe my luck runneth over? (or out?) Anyway, I don't have the luxury of company supplied insurance anymore so I need to set it correctly and maintain it the same way this go-round.

                No hurry, I do things in time, I have a few days off work and school to hang out around the house and catch up on the 'list' of things that needed done last winter....
                I would definitely not buy the "insurance" they offered, as it is likely not needed. A few sensible precautions should give you all the protection you need.

                After looking again at those long bodies on the regulators above, I suspect you may have two-stage regulators, a real plus if you wanted to do sheet aluminum welding with OA, or work with a jewelers torch, and usually much higher-priced than single stage. Esab would likely know, if you gave them the model #s.

                You have the right idea with the arresters and check-valves and what you have suggested is a common set-up. (Many modern arresters are lighter weight and have the check valves built in, and most Victor torches have had built-in arresters for years). Just make sure you don't buy the high pressure variety intended only for heavy-duty cutting.

                The pops and hisses (back-fires, burn-backs, and flashbacks) can be cured by following a few simple rules. If you do, they should disappear, even without the safety devices.

                1) Always balance gases, when welding or brazing.

                2) Do not overheat or block the tip.

                3) Always set cutting torches properly. (Below is an procedure I posted previously).

                To set a cutting torch properly, you should 1) set to the recommended pressure for your tip number AND metal thickness. 2) Turn acetylene torch valve on 1/4 -1/2 turn and light. 3) Turn acetylene torch valve wide open (3 full turns). 4) Adjust regulator valve until acetylene flame is just blowing away from tip. 5)Turn down acetylene until flame just returns to tip. 6) Turn on oxygen slowly (or flame will blow out ) and adjust to a neutral flame, then depress cutting lever and re-adjust to neutral. If you follow this procedure, you should be able to cut at the range of oxygen pressures for that tip with little risk of back-fires, burn-backs, or flash-backs (as long as you do not over-heat the torch, block the tip or have a loose or dirty tip).
                Last edited by Northweldor; 12-24-2014, 05:13 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hey Northweldor,
                  Thanks for the response.

                  No they weren't offering any insurance, it was for my farm insurance. I took the set to them and they checked them out a bit. Everything in the kit is of the stainless variety, all the welding and cutting tips anyway and the rosebud. It has the full compliment of available standard cutting and welding tips in the there it seems. The torch handle has already been rebuilt it appears, I was under the impression it was near new when I got it, but it is still in great shape. It's a w-17.

                  On a different note...

                  In the construction company I worked at for 23 years we used both Smith and Victor torches from maybe the 1600's? At least they appeared to be that old, and I know that only one was rebuilt in all that time.

                  Working for weeks at a time in the mud and dust of demoing a bridge with the same cutting tip (that was always the same size (#2)) made the work ....interesting. We would cut 1/2" rebar all day then switch to cutting a 3/4" half-rusty I-beam with ten layers of lead based paint on it all the time. Then, the same tip that was blowing through maybe three holes, would be used to cut the heads off rivets and then blow the bodies out. I could do almost anything with one size of tip it seemed (not really). Hissing (because I had no ideas it was dangerous) was commonplace. Loosing my balance and touching the slag while perched on the edge of a pier reaching down as far as possible to cut that last couple of pieces of rebar that was preventing the truck-sized chunk of bridge deck from dropping was also common. Having a clean tip was only possible when a new tip was installed (rarely, very rarely) however, we would ruin two or three tip cleaners before the tip was actually changed. Those new tips lasted about ten minutes though before they were shoved in the dirt or something by someone.

                  These were the same torch setups we used in the shop too. Everyone hated the Victor torch. It was the most finicky, the two Smith's seemed to take a lickin and keep on tickin regardless. And running out of gasses was commonplace since we sometimes used 100 feet of hose to reach the work area. Like I said before...ignorance is bliss...
                  Last edited by Greybeard; 12-26-2014, 03:11 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    New unhappy developments

                    I finally went out and hooked the gauges up. First off, I'm no expert on regulators, so they looked fine to me, yet even so, I was yet again taken advantage of by someone here in Iowa. And since these have sat around in a tool box for at least 12 years I have to eat it.

                    I attached the acetylene regulator first, cracked the valve and immediately wrecked the low pressure gauge. It was installed on the wrong outlet of the regulator.

                    I looked over the oxygen regulator and couldn't tell if it was right so I bit my tongue and lo and behold it was assembled wrong too and another wrecked low pressure gauge.

                    OK, so moved the two gauges on the acetylene to the opposite holes and hooked it up again and wonder of all wonders the regulator leaks (creeps). Didn't bother with the oxygen regulator.

                    So now I'm hoping they can be rebuilt. So much for a great deal.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Greybeard View Post
                      I finally went out and hooked the gauges up. First off, I'm no expert on regulators, so they looked fine to me, yet even so, I was yet again taken advantage of by someone here in Iowa. And since these have sat around in a tool box for at least 12 years I have to eat it.

                      I attached the acetylene regulator first, cracked the valve and immediately wrecked the low pressure gauge. It was installed on the wrong outlet of the regulator.

                      I looked over the oxygen regulator and couldn't tell if it was right so I bit my tongue and lo and behold it was assembled wrong too and another wrecked low pressure gauge.

                      OK, so moved the two gauges on the acetylene to the opposite holes and hooked it up again and wonder of all wonders the regulator leaks (creeps). Didn't bother with the oxygen regulator.

                      So now I'm hoping they can be rebuilt. So much for a great deal.
                      Try Bill's Welder Repair in Oklahoma City, if you can't find anything locally. Usually has fast service and reasonable prices. Still worth spending some money on the outfit. I should have noticed that, in your first picture, the low pressure gauge is on the bullnose side.
                      Last edited by Northweldor; 12-26-2014, 07:10 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I suppose that after wrecking the fuel gas regulator I should have thought a little more about what and why before I hooked the oxy side up and wrecked that gauge also. The acetylene gauge might have been salvageable had I just taken it to a shop, but no...I have to mess with things myself; can never learn anything if I don't break stuff. Well, I broke it completely too. The only problem was it parked at 5lbs after I cracked open the valve, so instead of gently bending the tube back (which likely would have altered it's accuracy anyway) I tried to reset the needle on the gear set inside. My fat fingers have no dexterity left so I lost control of the needle and it unwound the watch spring (I had somehow bent the needle tip up enough to clear the peg) .. I so dumb! After trying to rewind the watch spring with the needle I found it is a minute fraction of a turn to pass the point of being too tight and the spring self destructed into a birds nest. Note to self, some things shouldn't be attempted by amateurs. Even though I fix my own pendulum clocks, these things are much more touchy than a Black Forest clock mechanism with Westminster chimes.

                        ETA- I hope to be able to find two Union Carbide gauges that match everything instead of buying the bland new style gauges.
                        Last edited by Greybeard; 12-26-2014, 03:41 PM.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X