Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Craftsman torch question

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Craftsman torch question

    I recently got this torch and was wondering about it. Does anyone know what year it is? Does anyone know where I can get replacement tips? Lastly, is it meant only for cutting as I just want to braze. Any help would be greatly appreciated!!!!!!

    Torch handle says part number 313.20292.


  • #2
    Try Sears Parts first...

    http://www.searspartsdirect.com

    According to Sears parts site, the number you posted as model/part number is not valid....

    Better picture, larger without glare and better focus could tell us a lot more....

    Dale
    Last edited by Dale M.; 05-28-2013, 10:40 PM.
    "Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson..

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Dale M. View Post
      Try Sears Parts first...

      http://www.searspartsdirect.com

      According to Sears parts site, the number you posted as model/part number is not valid....

      Better picture, larger without glare and better focus could tell us a lot more....

      Dale
      Here is a pic of the handle with the part number on it:

      Comment


      • #4
        As has been said, your pics are on the poor side as far as being able to discern just what you have. Looks like that torch will fill your needs for brazing, but not cutting as I don't see anything other than a brazing tip and no cutting attachment. Craftsman has never made a tool as far as I know. Take the torch down to your local welding supply house and see what they can do for you. Hopefully it is old enough to have been made in the U.S. by one of the major manufacturers for Craftsman. If so, and the company is still around, you should be able to find all the bits and pieces you want for it. You will need larger tanks if you do want to do much of any cutting, as well as a cutting attachment for that handle.

        EDIT: For God's sakes take the torch to your local welding supply instead of over paying for Craftsman parts!
        Miller 251, Lincoln PrecisionTig 275, Miller DialArc 250 AC/DC, Hypertherm 900, Bridgeport J-head, Jet 14" lathe, South Bend 9" lathe, Hossfeld bender with a collection of dies driving me to the poorhouse, Logan shaper, Ellis 3000 bandsaw, Royersford drill press and a Victor Journeyman O/A.

        Comment


        • #5
          They use to be Harris, the set I got in the late 60's is a Harris rig. You can try here http://www.americantorchtip.com/
          glen, been there, done that and probably broke it!If you aren't on the edge. You'r taking up to much room

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Wyoming View Post

            EDIT: For God's sakes take the torch to your local welding supply instead of over paying for Craftsman parts!
            Yes, Sears as a rule is about 40% - 50% more for parts than retail market..... Was replacing controller board in a KENMORE (Whirlpool) washer, Sears wanted $220 for board, got it for about $165 at online appliance store... Same circuit board from Whirlpool .... And it goes on from there...

            The 313 in beginning of part number signifies it was made under contract for Sears/Craftsman by XXXX company.....

            ON recent restoration of a "Craftsman Commercial Band Saw", I found out it was manufactured by Clausing and parts were cheaper direct from Clausing...

            Dale
            "Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson..

            Comment


            • #7
              ptsideshow was correct, it is a Harris. Here is a list of Sears manufacturing codes. http://sears.pammar.net/maker.html

              Check out the following link for Harris parts. If you look into the N. American Harris Gas Apparatus & Flow Control Equipment catalog on the link below you should be able to find the parts you need as they appear to still offer that torch package.
              http://www.harrisproductsgroup.com/en/Catalogs.aspx
              Miller 251, Lincoln PrecisionTig 275, Miller DialArc 250 AC/DC, Hypertherm 900, Bridgeport J-head, Jet 14" lathe, South Bend 9" lathe, Hossfeld bender with a collection of dies driving me to the poorhouse, Logan shaper, Ellis 3000 bandsaw, Royersford drill press and a Victor Journeyman O/A.

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks for all the replies. I have one more question and I will try to get a pic. On the other side of the torch there is a button. You can press it or slide it up and it locks into place. I was thinking that would be like the handle on a cutting torch. Is anyone familiar with this setup?

                Comment


                • #9



                  Here is a pic that shows the whole torch and the button I am referring too.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I can only add some thoughts, First for a cutting torch you have to have two oxy valves, in addition to the fuel gas valve. One is for the over burn oxy what blows the molten metal away. The other for the oxy that burns the fuel gas for the heat. Look at the torch tip if there is only one hole it isn't a cutting torch tip. They will be using a large volume and pressure of oxygen for cutting then welding/soldering.

                    The slider could be a lock for one of the knobs that control the flow of oxy or fuel to the torch. last resort send a photo with email asking the manufacturer. While you are at it ask them for a copy of the torchs parts list or operating sheet if they have it.

                    Using a cutting attachment with those small cylinders the oxygen one wouldn't last any time at all.
                    glen, been there, done that and probably broke it!If you aren't on the edge. You'r taking up to much room

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Many of those Harris "plumber's" torch had auto-ignition and that may be the lock-on control for that.

                      As ptsideshow said, this outfit is suitable for your purpose (brazing), but if used heavily, will cost too much for gas, and is nearly useless for cutting because of this.
                      Last edited by Northweldor; 06-01-2013, 09:46 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Have to agree the tiny bottles are very economically challenging... Very expensive to fill and mileage is be minimal...

                        Dale
                        "Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson..

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Think4WD View Post
                          Thanks for all the replies. I have one more question and I will try to get a pic. On the other side of the torch there is a button. You can press it or slide it up and it locks into place. I was thinking that would be like the handle on a cutting torch. Is anyone familiar with this setup?
                          Sears sold a Harris torch back in the day that had a pilot setting. If you were welding, and needed to set the torch down for a second, you moved the switch and it went to a lower pilot like setting. When you slid it back, it went to full flame again.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ptsideshow View Post
                            I can only add some thoughts, First for a cutting torch you have to have two oxy valves, in addition to the fuel gas valve. One is for the over burn oxy what blows the molten metal away. The other for the oxy that burns the fuel gas for the heat. Look at the torch tip if there is only one hole it isn't a cutting torch tip. They will be using a large volume and pressure of oxygen for cutting then welding/soldering.

                            The slider could be a lock for one of the knobs that control the flow of oxy or fuel to the torch. last resort send a photo with email asking the manufacturer. While you are at it ask them for a copy of the torchs parts list or operating sheet if they have it.

                            Using a cutting attachment with those small cylinders the oxygen one wouldn't last any time at all.
                            The tip on this torch has several small holes in a circular pattern about 6 I believe but not one in the center. I thought on a typical cutting tip you had an outside row of holes and then a center one but Im not sure on this? I was thinking that buttom could be an auto ignition too but it doesnt seem to create any spark or have any mechanical resistance like a typical piezo ignitor on lets say a BBQ lighter. I just got the tanks filled so I guess I just need to try the button and see what it does, pherhaps it is a pilot setting. I do refrigeration work so typical I am only brazing maybe 3/8" tubing so I believe I should get a long life out of these tanks. Thanks for all the continuing replies!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              IF you are only doing small tubing you will want a smaller tip for your torch....

                              Old style single fuel, acetylene/air torch referred to as a "prestolite" torch would probably be sufficient and less expensive to operate...



                              Also for refrigeration work I would think "silver solder" would be better than "brass" brazing process...

                              Dale
                              Last edited by Dale M.; 06-01-2013, 04:50 PM.
                              "Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson..

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X