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  • How to begin..

    Anyone got any reliable web links on how to properly use Oxy Acetylene?

    I am looking to learn, have all to do it, (hubby bought a kit a few years ago), but he isn't very confident with it either. I want to make sure that I do things right so that I am safe. I can seem to use mapp gas with no problem but the minute I start thinking about two tanks I get a bit nervous.. LOL

    also.. If you know of any good books, I would be open to that as well. would be great if they didn't read to hard tho.. I hate over technical stuff..I have an old Aircraft Welders book that they give new service guys, copywrite 1944, I am sure not much has changed, but ya know.. better safe than sorry. (I got the book from an retired military man)

    thanks!

  • #2
    The major brands have websites with most, if not all, the information you are looking for. Victor offers How-To tutorials in both video and document form. Another possible source would be your local welding supply. Try asking if they have any promotional literature dealing with training and use of oxy/acetylene.

    http://victortechnologies.com/victor/
    http://www.smithequipment.com/
    http://www.harrisproductsgroup.com/e...t/Torches.aspx
    Miller 251, Lincoln PrecisionTig 275, Miller DialArc 250 AC/DC, Hypertherm 900, Bridgeport J-head, Jet 14" lathe, South Bend 9" lathe, Hossfeld bender with a collection of dies driving me to the poorhouse, Logan shaper, Ellis 3000 bandsaw, Royersford drill press and a Victor Journeyman O/A.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by jrasche2003 View Post
      but the minute I start thinking about two tanks I get a bit nervous.. LOL

      And you very well should!

      Heck, I get nervous using a bic lighter.

      I see people using O/A that have been doing so for over 40 years doing stuff that they have gotten away with doing and it is a waste of breath to bother bringing it up to them. That makes it rather difficult to take direction from any would be teacher on this topic.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Wyoming View Post
        The major brands have websites with most, if not all, the information you are looking for. Victor offers How-To tutorials in both video and document form. Another possible source would be your local welding supply. Try asking if they have any promotional literature dealing with training and use of oxy/acetylene.

        http://victortechnologies.com/victor/
        http://www.smithequipment.com/
        http://www.harrisproductsgroup.com/e...t/Torches.aspx
        Another source would be Esab U, where they have an updated version of the old OA Weldor's Hand Book.

        I would also check to see that your outfit has flashback arrestors installed at the regulators. If not, go to your local weldor's supply, purchase a pair and install. Make sure you ask for low pressure arrestors, for welding,

        For O-A welding, below is a set of instructions I wrote specifically for beginning O-A weldors (old-school, but ultra-safe, since it actually tests your equipment every time you use it). Many will say it is too time-consuming to use this, but with a little practice, you can probably do it in under 2 minutes.
        (This has been posted on this site for several years, and also, on the AWS website, so it has been examined by many highly experienced weldors without complaint).


        " While most of the discussion above has centered on OA cutting, where pressures are always unequal, and more susceptible to flashbacks, I was wondering why no one has mentioned balancing gases as a procedure to both reduce flashback danger and check equipment daily in OA welding. This is something that was standard procedure in OA welding instruction many years ago and is just as useful today. Below is my description of the procedure (which has been listed here before):


        Back in the” old days”, before the widespread use of check valves and flashback arrestors, beginners were always taught to balance gases. This is a procedure I still use today, not only because of safety, but because it is a good way to check on the current condition of your equipment, and guarantees the correct setting with any tip size or regulator gauge peculiarity. With a little practice, it only takes a minute, and accurately gives you the proper setting with any make of equipment, with the max. and min. of the heat range of any tip.

        With both bottles on, and regulator adjusting screws turned out (“off” position), turn the acetylene torch valve wide-open (3 half turns is usually enough). Then, turn your acetylene regulator adjusting screw in until gas starts to flow and light the torch. Continue to turn the adjusting screw in until the flame just blows away from the tip, then back off the screw until the flame just returns to the tip. Your acetylene pressure is now set for that tip.

        Then , open the oxygen torch valve wide-open (3 half turns) and slowly begin to turn your oxygen regulator adjusting screw in until you you have a blue feather extending from a blue cone at the tip. Continue to add oxygen until the feather just disappears into the inner cone, giving you a neutral flame. You now have the torch set for maximum heat for that tip. (Wiggle both torch valves at this point to make sure you have them wide-open: if you do the flame will not change)

        Finally, turn your oxygen torch valve off. Then, close your acetylene torch valve until the yellow flame starts to produce smoke, and immediately open it just so it is not smoking. Slowly open your oxygen torch valve until you again have a neutral flame , and you now have the minimum flame you can use on that tip without backfires.

        The safety factor created by using this procedure is that both gases are at equal pressure when you are done, so that it is impossible for either gas to back up into the other line to cause a flashback.

        This seems like a lot of trouble, but only takes 1-2 minutes with practice and only needs to be done once unless tips or regulator settings are changed. Also, note that at no point are you depending on or even looking at regulator gauges, which can be very unreliable when abused. This method will work with all standard OA equipment for welding.

        Apart from this, there seems to be some confusion about what a flashback actually is (although, not in the pictures Rocky posted!). I was always taught the distinction between flashback (an event in which equipment is damaged or destroyed), burnback ( the high-pitched buzzing-whistling that is caused by gases burning in the mixer) and backfire (the explosion of gases in the mixer ). "
        Last edited by Northweldor; 05-18-2013, 01:44 PM. Reason: Adding Arrestor purchase advice

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        • #5
          If you follow the advice given, including the stuff in the web pages that were cited, you should be ok. But if you still don't have a good feeling (which is understandable --- there are some subtleties that you really want to get right) then look around for a vo-tech highschool or something like that which offers night classes and/or adult ed and check that they offer O/A.

          Frank

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          • #6
            I think this video by Smith is pretty good:

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RLwH3GKpVvo
            --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

            Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
            -------------------------

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            • #7
              Originally posted by usmcpop View Post
              I think this video by Smith is pretty good:

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RLwH3GKpVvo
              I agree, except for the following:

              a) Doesn't mention that other makes might need to be snugged up with a wrench.

              b) Gave the impression that switching to welding or heating was just a matter of switching tips.

              c) Did not stress using mfgs. thickness charts, (rather than 35psi for oxygen and 10psi for acetylene) and thus, not wasting gas.

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