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  • About to acquire oxy/acetylene....

    I will be getting a set complete set of o/a soon. It has the two tanks, long hoses, torch and gauges. I have done some minor stick welding in the past and now, when I do any fabricating it's usually done with my Hobart 135 mig.
    It was suggested that, because of the age of the tanks (unknown at this point) that they need to be pressure checked. It was also suggested that I can use the oxygen bottle and a propane tank with propane instead of the acetylene. Was also told that different tips would be needed. Possibly different valves, possibly different connector. I'm new to using a torch, so all your comments and cautions are welcome. By the way, it would most likely be used for cutting stock or heating rusted stuff.....

  • #2
    Captain Bob,
    First of all if there is fuel and oxygen in the bottles already just use it up.. When you go to have them refilled or exchanged they will let you know if they are owner bottles or not. Then take it from there if you want to lease or buy or have bottles tested. In my area it cost 20 bucks to have a bottle tested.
    As far as Propane as fuel it will save you alot of money compared to acetylene. You don't have to do anything about the regulators. People say you need a hose compatible for propane but I disagree I have been using mine for over 25-30 years and the last 14 with propane. It does however take a special two piece tip for propane. You cannot weld with propane but, you can braze with it. I think they say propane is 400 degrees cooler but, that is no issue with me.....
    If you want to run propane take your torch to the welding and supply store and have them get you a tip...
    sigpic

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    • #3
      Oxy/propane....

      Thanks, Urch55. Comforting words for a newbie.... I'll be picking them up in a week or two.

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      • #4
        I use both OA and OP, since it's a simple tip swap.

        It's nice to grab a BBQ grill jug for salvage yard runs. No acetylene slosh hazard issues and much lighter to carry.

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        • #5
          fork-lift propane tank for o/a alternative fuel set up

          I recently got a 8 gal. fork-lift propane tank for use as alternative to acetylene for cutting. Is there any thing other than torch tips for propane I need to get? I was told that propane tanks used on fork-lifts are somehow different than bar-b-q swap-out tanks. Does anybody have experience with fork-lift tanks on cutting torch sets?

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          • #6
            Torch cutting eats up Oxy fairly quickly VS Welding or Braising.
            I preferred Plasma for cutting when I was in to O/A and torch work.

            However, O/A is definitely useful and can fill multiple roles.

            One thing I'd do, OP, is make sure I had check valves. You don't want flashback.

            I finally sold my O/A rig because I didn't like those bottles sitting in the shop when I rarely used them. I sometimes miss the setup but am glad it's gone. Still, the usefulness of O/A is amazing. You can do so much with it. Braising is so powerful as a joining medium. And it's stronger than most welds. I probably miss Braising the most.

            Hobart StickMate LX 235 AC/DC
            Hobart Handler 125 EZ
            Hobart Handler 187
            Champion 4500
            Mag-Power MP 55 Plasma
            Lincoln Precision TIG 185
            Smith O/A

            Clarke 95e

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            • #7
              Propane tanks used for fork lift truck are generally "liquid draw" (some do have vapor draw also) where the ubiquitous 5 gallon (20lb) BBQ tank is a "vapor draw" tank... You want "vapor draw" option for welding/heating purposes..

              Propane/Oxygen flame is approximately 5300° F.

              Acetylene/Oxygen flame is approximately 6300° F.

              Dittos on comments about brasing.... Use it almost exclusively on projects I can not weld with MIG machine...

              Dale
              Last edited by Dale M.; 05-13-2014, 10:04 PM.
              "Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson..

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              • #8
                Can't believe it's been two years....

                Well, I do have the torch kit. And my son had the oxygen bottle topped off for me. All I've used it for so far was as the proverbial smoke wrench. So, now it's on to something more complicated like...brazing. Never did that. I may be needing that talent for a rusty oil pan on the car. I just watched a few videos on brazing techniques and, when it's comfy enough in the barn, I'll do some experimenting on thin gauge sheet metal. Maybe poke a hole in something and see how much damage I can do.... Unfortunately that oil pan has to remain in place. The hole is accessible, but it is on the sidewall. I'll play with that feature and may try using MAPP gas, too. Not sure which will work better. I do like the smaller flame MAPP will have versus the O/A. Any suggestions?
                By the way, I heard an interesting comment about it being stronger than a weld. Is that true?

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                • #9
                  There has to be at least 4-6 tip sizes good for the home welding setup... I have a #000 (extremely small) #0 -#4 - #2 and rosebud and cutting head all on Victor 100 series torch body, there is not much I can't do.... You have to remember there is correct tip for each type/size welding operation... When brazing when work starts to come up to red heat and you feed brazing rod in and it flows, work and rod are hot enough, and pull flame back a bit to keep from over heating and blowing holes in work.... Its a learned skill....

                  Using MAP-PRO is like trying to braze with a kitchen match once you master O/A....

                  Dale
                  Last edited by Dale M.; 02-18-2015, 03:19 PM.
                  "Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson..

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                  • #10
                    I'd need to practice a couple of times, but in high school I used to braze small pipe tobacco cans together with a piece of wire on one side to make small fishing tackle kits that could be clipped on a belt. Bait in one can, hooks, sinkers, bobbers in the other. Ended up getting shop credit for repairing about 30 stools for the drafting classroom that had the lower (foot rest) rings broken off. O/A is real versatile. Drove everybody nuts because I held the torch in my left hand; felt more comfortable adjusting the gas and feeding the rod with my right, so it was always "backwards."
                    Blacksmith
                    Stickmate LX AC/DC
                    Big cheap (Chinese) Anvil
                    Hand cranked coal forge
                    Freon bottle propane forge
                    HH 210 and bottle of C25

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by mrcaptainbob View Post
                      Well, I do have the torch kit. And my son had the oxygen bottle topped off for me. All I've used it for so far was as the proverbial smoke wrench. So, now it's on to something more complicated like...brazing. Never did that. I may be needing that talent for a rusty oil pan on the car. I just watched a few videos on brazing techniques and, when it's comfy enough in the barn, I'll do some experimenting on thin gauge sheet metal. Maybe poke a hole in something and see how much damage I can do.... Unfortunately that oil pan has to remain in place. The hole is accessible, but it is on the sidewall. I'll play with that feature and may try using MAPP gas, too. Not sure which will work better. I do like the smaller flame MAPP will have versus the O/A. Any suggestions?
                      By the way, I heard an interesting comment about it being stronger than a weld. Is that true?
                      If the statement above, in bold, is true, why, and how do you plan to deal with a possibly explosive situation?

                      A braze can be "stronger" than a weld due to differing joint design and process in the comparison. Eg. If a lap weld is welded with a single fillet on one side, it may be "weaker" due to a very small joined surface in the weld area. A braze from one side may flow bronze material throughout the entire lapped area if fit-up is close, giving a much larger joined area. (Stronger and weaker, in welding, are vague relative terms.

                      Brazed lapped welds have been used in light-weight race-car frames for many years, leading to the myth above.
                      Last edited by Northweldor; 02-23-2015, 11:34 AM.

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                      • #12
                        Things being what they are due to the location of the oil pan leak, and not being able, or wanting to remove the oil pan, I would opt for something besides brazing since you are relatively new to using a torch.

                        I have in the past repaired oil pans and transmission pans that for one reason or another could not be removed. The safest, and probably the easiest repair was accomplished by sanding/grinding the damaged area down to shiny metal after draining the oil. I usually make sure the metal is cleaned about 3/4" to 1" on all sides of the leaking area. I then clean with a solvent or use Brakleen. After the solvent has completely dried I will apply one of many different types of epoxy using pressure from your fingers to push the epoxy as far into the crack or hole as possible. If the outside temperature is fairly cool, I will use a heat gun or Mapp torch to warm the area prior to applying the epoxy. Besides pushing the epoxy into the crack/hole, be sure to cover as much of the area you sanded until it was shiny with the epoxy.

                        I have used the above method numerous times, and as far as I know none have ever leaked again. I have used regular JB Weld and Loctite Epoxy Putty with excellent results.

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                        • #13
                          I'll back up what Northweldor said in regards to Brazing strength. Often time people look at Brazing as a sort of welding process when it is actually more of a high heat soldering process. You will have great difficulty trying to just fill the hole with Braze. You will be best to try to cut a patch to cover the hole and let the Brazing material "suck" itself under the patch and to adhere to both the patch and the pan. (The $10.00 word for suck is actually Capillary Action but suck works. )

                          Another problem you will run into is no matter how clean you can get the outside of the pan, once you start heating the area you will start drawing all sorts of contaminates from the inside of the pan toward the crack/hole. You might try a little preheating in the area to get the junk to come out and continually clean the area before you start actually trying to effect the repair.

                          Finally Northweldor touched on the point that the pan and inside of the engine is absolutely full of burnable hydrocarbons from oil to raw gas. You do run a real risk of at the minimum a "Woof" to the possibly a "Boom". You should probably try to figure out some method to purge out all the oxygen from inside the block before you start the heating. I think at minimum you might want to pull a valve cover so at least if you get a "Woof" it might not blow out any gaskets and have enough area to vent.

                          My $.02, Mileage and results will vary.

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