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  • Acetylene regulator pulsing?

    Hello,

    I was using my little OA setup today to do some repair work on a snowblower. A couple of times, my acetylene regulator would start pulsing, and the pressure would vary by a couple of PSI. It was making noise like a spring popping.

    I've never had it do that before. I was working outside in 35ish degree weather. I was able to get it to stop by varying the pressure, and then putting it back where I wanted it.

    The OA unit is a Victor that I use very infrequently. It was purchased new 10 years ago and has always been stored inside. I'm still on the original tanks of gas, that's how low my usage is. I do loosen the regulators when not in use as I was taught in my basic welding class.

    Any idea what is happening? Am I low on acetylene? Or is it a regulator issue?

    Thanks for any ideas,
    Randy
    Hobart Handler 140
    1963 Lincoln Tombstone AC180
    Vintage 4 x 6 Craftsman Commercial bandsaw
    Small OA rig

  • #2
    I would take an educated guess and say that your regulator is getting ready to croak.
    Arcin' and sparkin', Rocky D <><
    Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.
    IF YOU CAN READ THIS, THANK A TEACHER...
    IF YOU'RE READING THIS IN ENGLISH, THANK A SOLDIER!

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    • #3
      I just had the same problem with my acetylene regulator. Not wanting to take a chance on something bad happening I purchased a new regulator. I don't like to see the regulator pressure moving all over the place and making weird sounds.

      Comment


      • #4
        A very easy problem to solve. Have the Diaphram, Spring and seat replaced. They are not reacting to the pressure on the back side of the seat( if this is a single stage regulator). John
        Long time Teacher - Processes
        Owner - 2 LWS's
        Hobart - Lincoln- Miller - ESAB(Linde)

        Comment


        • #5
          Victors are easy to pull apart.....mine was acting up and the psi would raise from time to time so I pulled it apart and found a piece of trash in it....no problems since then....but it does sound like you need a rebuild
          Mike
          George W. Bush saving your butt whether you like it or not!
          If there must be trouble let it be in my day, that my child may have peace.
          Thomas Paine
          Fear is temporary, regret is forever
          HH210 w S.G.
          Victor/Uniweld O/P
          Dewalt Chop Saw

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks! I'll take a look and see what I find. Hopefully it can be rebuilt, as it has very little usage overall.

            Randy
            Hobart Handler 140
            1963 Lincoln Tombstone AC180
            Vintage 4 x 6 Craftsman Commercial bandsaw
            Small OA rig

            Comment


            • #7
              The problem with a DIY rebuild is no one seems to want to sell the parts. Considering the thread on misspelling acetylene that may be a good thing. LOL
              Dennis


              Thermal Arc 185-TSW
              Millermatic Challenger 172
              VictorO/A
              Atlas Craftsman 12 by 24 Lathe
              Esab PCM-875
              Wholesale Tool Mill-Drill

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              • #8
                Everyone is gun shy of lawsuits. They can but won´t.
                Local Airgas will not sell CO2 when you tell them it is for refilling paint ball gun CO2 tanks. Parents sued after kid had accident. US civil law lets lawyers go after deepest packets with remotest liability.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Your regulator problem may be due to a pin hole in its diaphragm. I had a fairly new Smith single-stage oxygen regulator that had the same problem. It made it difficult to maintain a neutral flame in my welding torch. Although my Smith welding outfit was about 6 months out of warranty by the time I discovered the cause of my pressure fluctuation, the Smith customer service rep I phoned sent me a new oxygen regulator. They didn't even want the old one returned. My torch has worked well ever since then. I donated the defective, but relatively unused regulator to a local welding equipment repair shop. The owner was glad to get it as a new diaphragm may have been all that it needed.

                  LarryL

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Small victor regulators, model number unknown, almost new, they have about two hours of use on them. Oxy began to pulse and 5 ,minutes later Act began same thing. Put different cutting torch on with no change. Speed of pulse is about 5 per second. Problem is there regardless of pressure. Cutting ( trying to ) pressure Oxy 20 and Act 5. Had to use Teflon tape on the Act bottle to regulator connection but only there. Tomorrow will change hoses and regulators for testing.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      No Teflon tape (ptfe), Ever... IF you can't get seal on regulator to tank it has problem, if problem is with tank valve return it to you gas supplier.... Ptfe tape is only used on tapered (NPT) fittings...

                      Dale
                      Last edited by Dale M.; 01-05-2018, 11:44 PM.
                      Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by dfballard View Post
                        Small victor regulators, model number unknown, almost new, they have about two hours of use on them. Oxy began to pulse and 5 ,minutes later Act began same thing. Put different cutting torch on with no change. Speed of pulse is about 5 per second. Problem is there regardless of pressure. Cutting ( trying to ) pressure Oxy 20 and Act 5. Had to use Teflon tape on the Act bottle to regulator connection but only there. Tomorrow will change hoses and regulators for testing.
                        If the regulators are older, they may have rubber-like material diaphragms which have deteriorated, and are leaking. Also, the regulator connection on your acetylene must be damaged on the bull-nose, and/or have stretched threads due to over-tightening. Probably wise, to stop using and send in fr repair, since this part will be needed in addition to kit, but may be included in flat rate repair.

                        Also, to all kit enthusiasts, even if you do install a kit, your regulator has not had its pressure relief valve tested, which, if seized, could cause an an over-pressure explosion. All reputable repair shops have a cylinder of nitrogen, with a regulator capable of the pressure needed to open the valve (about 450 psi) and routinely do this as part of repair.

                        PS: (to recent second OP, always start your own thread).
                        Last edited by Northweldor; 01-05-2018, 01:11 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Might consider sending the regulators in for service...

                          This one place of possibly many that can do the work...

                          http://www.regulatortorchrepair.com/rebulid-services

                          Dale


                          Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            As per Victor, these regulators, model ESS3, have a recurring issue - - the pulsing. They said that it was common with that series of regulator. The problem is that the diaphragm is not releasing from the inner portion of the unit that the diaphragm presses on ( I may be using the wrong terminology here, but the end result is correct) They said to shut down the system, purge the hoses, leave the valves at the torch cracked, and then turn the pressure regulating valve open and closed several times ( it took us 6 cycles to clear the trouble). If you are having Oxy and Act trouble, as we did, them work on one system at a time.The units have a five year warranty. Per Victor, it is nice if you have the original receipts, but not absolutely necessary as they have the serial numbers on file as to when they were made. They factor in about one year sitting on the dealer's shelf, then you have roughly 4 years of warranty left. Units are working fine now. Good luck.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by dfballard View Post
                              As per Victor, these regulators, model ESS3, have a recurring issue - - the pulsing. They said that it was common with that series of regulator. The problem is that the diaphragm is not releasing from the inner portion of the unit that the diaphragm presses on ( I may be using the wrong terminology here, but the end result is correct) They said to shut down the system, purge the hoses, leave the valves at the torch cracked, and then turn the pressure regulating valve open and closed several times ( it took us 6 cycles to clear the trouble). If you are having Oxy and Act trouble, as we did, them work on one system at a time.The units have a five year warranty. Per Victor, it is nice if you have the original receipts, but not absolutely necessary as they have the serial numbers on file as to when they were made. They factor in about one year sitting on the dealer's shelf, then you have roughly 4 years of warranty left. Units are working fine now. Good luck.
                              Interesting, but we would appreciate a link to Victor/Esab, where you got this information, as well as the model #'s to avoid.

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