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First attempt at O/A welding

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  • First attempt at O/A welding

    Wow, so I was just curious about all this O/A welding stuff since I had never tried it before. So I broke out the torch and got a piece of scrap metal and an old 1/8 6011 rod. I chipped all the flux off the rod and started heating the steel. Got the puddle and dipped the rod, then moved a little and dipped again and again....etc. The bead looked pretty decent after about the first 5 minutes or so and I fealt pretty good about it so I decided to try to weld two pieces together. All the small scrap I had was a piece of flat and a piece of angle iron so I just layed the angle iron on the flat and tried a fillet weld.....terrible. I couldn't get the puddle to take metal from both pieces. I could get both to puddle up, but not at the same time. Didn't have the camera with me, so no picks, but anybody got any suggestions? I was thinking that I needed a bigger flame since my filler metal was awefully close to the tip in order to get to the puddle, but it seamed like a bigger flame was too much for the tip because it got pretty loud.
    Contact me for any metal polishing needs you may have, my avatar is a pic of a standard, painted fire axe that I ground, sanded polished and buffed to a mirror finish.

  • #2
    How thick was the metal that you were trying to weld? What size tip were you using?

    A fillet weld is a hard weld to start learning gas welding on. I recommend getting some 1/8" strap and practice just running some beads on it. Get some 1/16" RG45 filler (it shouldn't cost too much for a pound or so). After running beads do a butt weld between two pieces of the strap with a 1/16" gap in between them. If the pieces of strap are over a couple of inches long you'll probably want to tack them in a few places first, otherwise the gap will close as you move along the weld.

    Then try a few lap welds. Lastly, try the fillet welds. Like you noticed, it's very hard to get the root of the weld to wet out. See if you can position the weld so that it's flat for your first practice sessions.

    Remember, the puddle should be melting your filler rod, not the torch flame. Start the puddle on your metal, dip the filler, then use the heat of the torch to move the puddle along a bit, then dip again and repeat. Post some pictures if you can!
    Miller Dynasty 200DX
    Hobart T225 Stick
    Hobart Handler 180
    Airco O/A Rig
    ESAB W-200 O/A torch

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    • #3
      yeah, what he said

      Were you trying a Lapp Weld or a Fillet Weld? Anyhooo just start w/o filler rod and do like Villemur said and start with some 1/8" Flat stock butt welds.

      Here is a Tip Chart

      http://www.hoopersupply.com/tipchart.html
      Ed Conley
      Screaming Broccoli, Inc
      http://www.screamingbroccoli.net/
      MM252
      MM211
      Miller Passport Plus, Spoolmate 100
      TA185
      SO 2020 Bender
      Miller 125c Plasma
      "Hold my beer while I try this!"

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Broccoli1 View Post
        yeah, what he said

        Were you trying a Lapp Weld or a Fillet Weld? Anyhooo just start w/o filler rod and do like Villemur said and start with some 1/8" Flat stock butt welds.

        Here is a Tip Chart

        http://www.hoopersupply.com/tipchart.html
        I tied both sides of the angle, so one was a fillet and the other was a Lapp, and both were terrible. I don't know what size tip I was using, whatever comes with a standard torch set that includes a "0" Victor tip, but the metal was somewhere around 1/8 thick. I just wanted to give it a try incase I ever wanted to weld some aluminum at some point or something, I figured it would be best to start on steel and work up from there.
        Contact me for any metal polishing needs you may have, my avatar is a pic of a standard, painted fire axe that I ground, sanded polished and buffed to a mirror finish.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by txfireguy2003 View Post
          I don't know what size tip I was using, whatever comes with a standard torch set that includes a "0" Victor tip, but the metal was somewhere around 1/8 thick. I just wanted to give it a try incase I ever wanted to weld some aluminum at some point or something, I figured it would be best to start on steel and work up from there.
          Well you are handicapping yourself already

          Get the correct Tip for the thickness of Metal

          Work the butt welds w/o Filler, then with filler and then move on to Lapp Joints then Fillets.
          Ed Conley
          Screaming Broccoli, Inc
          http://www.screamingbroccoli.net/
          MM252
          MM211
          Miller Passport Plus, Spoolmate 100
          TA185
          SO 2020 Bender
          Miller 125c Plasma
          "Hold my beer while I try this!"

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          • #6
            If you are intested in gas welding Aluminum, you might think about getting one of these tapes. I got it when he was closing out his VHS versions for $6 and they are excellent.

            http://tinmantech.chainreactionweb.c..._weld_alum.php
            Lincoln 175HD
            Miller Thunderbolt AC/DC
            Smith AW1, Dillon (Henrob) Mark III & Smith Quickbraze Little Torch

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            • #7
              Originally posted by txfireguy2003 View Post
              I tied both sides of the angle, so one was a fillet and the other was a Lapp, and both were terrible. I don't know what size tip I was using, whatever comes with a standard torch set that includes a "0" Victor tip, but the metal was somewhere around 1/8 thick. I just wanted to give it a try incase I ever wanted to weld some aluminum at some point or something, I figured it would be best to start on steel and work up from there.
              You've approached this task the same way I did - go for it! You are having the same results I did - crap!

              There's more to it than "melt and move".

              You need clean steel. No paint. Light rust is OK.

              You need the correct tip, set at the right parameters, for the metal thickness you are welding. In your Victor package, there should be a booklet with a yellow cover: Welding, Cutting, & Heating Guide. Read it!

              Hank
              ...from the Gadget Garage
              MM 210 w/3035, BWE
              HH 210 w/DP 3035
              TA185TSW
              Victor O/A "J" series, SuperRange
              Avatar courtesy of Bob Sigmon...

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              • #8
                Originally posted by hankj View Post
                You've approached this task the same way I did - go for it! You are having the same results I did - crap!

                There's more to it than "melt and move".

                You need clean steel. No paint. Light rust is OK.

                You need the correct tip, set at the right parameters, for the metal thickness you are welding. In your Victor package, there should be a booklet with a yellow cover: Welding, Cutting, & Heating Guide. Read it!

                Hank
                Yeah, I read the book, but only had the one welding tip and just thought I would give it a shot. The metal was new steel, just some small pieces I had laying around after finishing another project, but it did have some mill scale on it since I didn't really feel like running the extension cord and firing up the grinder to knock the scale off. Like I said, the beads on the flat surface looked pretty good, wetted out well and all. I was like "Wow, that's MUCH easier than I thought it would be!" Then I tried to make a joint and was utterly disappointed! I was assuming that tip size was probably the biggest problem, and maybe the diameter of my filler metal, but gas welding is not a big enough interest in my life right now to justify buying more tips, I was really just doing something to pass the time and finish off my oxy cylinder before trading it in.
                Contact me for any metal polishing needs you may have, my avatar is a pic of a standard, painted fire axe that I ground, sanded polished and buffed to a mirror finish.

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                • #9
                  Sorry you feel that way.

                  O/A is a great teacher, IMHO. You get to control the puddle much more easily than in any other process, except TIG, and you have all the time in the world to learn how the puddle forms, how heat control works (a real bead vs. a dropout!), and maybe most important, how heat affects the weld metal.

                  I'll bet you whatever you want to wager that, if you become sufficiently proficient in O/A to "keyhole", you'll never have a problem learning any other process.

                  Hank
                  ...from the Gadget Garage
                  MM 210 w/3035, BWE
                  HH 210 w/DP 3035
                  TA185TSW
                  Victor O/A "J" series, SuperRange
                  Avatar courtesy of Bob Sigmon...

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