Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How bad is my work?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How bad is my work?

    Well I did have a login here but I forgot it, now that I'm actually in welding classes I thought it was high time I get back into this forum.

    I'm just looking for feedback on my O/A work. Currently I've been in the shop for a whole two days from 6:30pm to 10:00pm. I've managed to jokingly piss off the other students by not talking and working too much. Oh well. The pictures in order are, puddling, stringer beads, corner joint without filler, and corner joint with filler. I'm new to torch welding and honestly all welding so I'm just wondering if in doing good or bad. I at least got my regs set and torch lit to a neutral flame the first try.

    The weld puddles aren't due until the third/fourth day of practice, likewise for the stringer beads, and the corner joints. I've gone way ahead and am just having fun with it. The tickets are about 1/16" hot rolled steel, 2"x6".
    Son of usmcpop. Lincoln SP175+, Miller Syncrowave 250, Miller Dialarc 250 AC/DC, Victor O/A, Index 745 Mill, Clausing 5904 lathe, Harbor Freight 8x12 lathe.

    Accurate is a relative term...right?

  • #2
    Looks pretty good

    the beads look pretty good for a new O/A weldor.

    Great thing about O/A is you really can see and learn to control the puddle.

    O/A is my favorate modality. You can do so much with it, and IMHO, It makes you a better weldor. Wait until you start brazing. You'll learn to love it I think. Lot you can do with brazing you can't do with welding. So much you can do with a torch outfit, can't list it all here!

    Try different torch settings to experiment. Try and get real uniform with the puddle. Make the beads look like "STACKED DIMES" and you're there! Then, Go for a carbon then oxy flame instead of neutral. Your instructor can explain the difference and when/why they are used.

    Keep up the good work.

    -prowess

    Hobart StickMate LX 235 AC/DC
    Hobart Handler 125 EZ
    Hobart Handler 187
    Champion 4500
    Mag-Power MP 55 Plasma
    Lincoln Precision TIG 185
    Smith O/A

    Clarke 95e

    Comment


    • #3
      A few of those look better than my MIG welds.
      Hobart Handler 150
      Hobart Handler 187
      Miller Spectrum 250D
      Airco AC Stick Welder
      Harris O/A
      Makita Chopsaw & Grinders
      Jackson NexGen EQC
      Lots of duct tape, zip ties, and bailing wire.

      Comment


      • #4
        They look excellent. I did a couple the other day and they were nothing to write home about, very functional but its been years since we use OA for much real work, the feeders have replaced it for the most part in any general fabrication.
        http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

        Comment


        • #5
          How bad is my work?

          Hey thanks everybody. I haven't fiddled too much with different torch settings, mainly just seeing how hot I can go. I've done brazing at home but thats with an air/MAPP so its a far cry from what I'll be doing at school. I did try to go for the stack-o-dimes but I'm going to keep the ripple to a minimum if I can, especially in joints for stress distribution reasons. Not that it matters with tickets.

          My instructor hasn't gone into when a carbon or oxy flame gets used but I'm sure thats later on. Aside from learning control and coordination I've heard that there isn't much call for torch work, unless I want to build a plane some day .

          I'll keep everyone posted on what I'm up to. Thanks for the input.
          Son of usmcpop. Lincoln SP175+, Miller Syncrowave 250, Miller Dialarc 250 AC/DC, Victor O/A, Index 745 Mill, Clausing 5904 lathe, Harbor Freight 8x12 lathe.

          Accurate is a relative term...right?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by prowess View Post
            the beads look pretty good for a new O/A weldor.

            Great thing about O/A is you really can see and learn to control the puddle.

            O/A is my favorate modality. You can do so much with it, and IMHO, It makes you a better weldor. Wait until you start brazing. You'll learn to love it I think. Lot you can do with brazing you can't do with welding. So much you can do with a torch outfit, can't list it all here!

            Try different torch settings to experiment. Try and get real uniform with the puddle. Make the beads look like "STACKED DIMES" and you're there! Then, Go for a carbon then oxy flame instead of neutral. Your instructor can explain the difference and when/why they are used.

            Keep up the good work.

            -prowess

            I aggree its coming along.
            However dont beat yourself up over the "look" of the bead, its not going to look like a tig weld, especially if using the high strength fillers. Usually if you follow good practice of " forming an eye" and filling it while welding, and doing it in a consistent manner, the bead will follow suit and look nice.

            Carburizing flame ( 1x ) is good for rusty steel, but on clean material you can raise the carbon content of the weld and cause hardness. Works well on aluminum

            Neutral is all around your best bet on steel and stainless

            Oxidizing is normally only used on brazing with bronze based filler. Bad for any form of welding.

            Have fun and keep at it!
            "Better Metalworking Through Research"

            Miller Dynasty 300DX
            Miller Dynasty 200DX
            Miller Spectrum 375 extreme
            Miller Millermatic Passport

            Smith, Meco, Harris, Victor, Prest-o-lite, Marquette and even a Dillon O/A torch

            Comment


            • #7
              Very nice! What kinda filler rod did you use?

              Comment


              • #8
                filler and flames

                Um I honestly am not sure what filler I used since its really hard to read the stamp on those little wires. 29XX? I would need a magnifier or better light, yeah I'm young but my eyes belong to a nerd .

                Thanks Aero for the different flame uses. Brazing is going to come a good while later. I just cut about 200 plates the other night with their Betenbender hydraulic sheer; I don't know that I'm going to have much rusty metal needing a carb flame. I like the tip for raising the carbon content though. With the 8 total classes a week I'd give the metal about a week and a half on the shelf.
                Son of usmcpop. Lincoln SP175+, Miller Syncrowave 250, Miller Dialarc 250 AC/DC, Victor O/A, Index 745 Mill, Clausing 5904 lathe, Harbor Freight 8x12 lathe.

                Accurate is a relative term...right?

                Comment


                • #9
                  If you want to really see how good your corner joints are, saw one in cross-section, fle it (or grind it) smooth, and acid etch it. You'll see immediately if you have a weld, or just a pretty bead lieng on top!

                  What you have done so far looks real good for a beginner.

                  Hank
                  ...from the Gadget Garage
                  MM 210 w/3035, BWE
                  HH 210 w/DP 3035
                  TA185TSW
                  Victor O/A "J" series, SuperRange
                  Avatar courtesy of Bob Sigmon...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Good thread.

                    Interesting. Well good luck on building an aircraft. If I were going to build my own aircraft, I'd sure be on top of my form when I did !
                    Personally, I'd use my TIG setup for that, but you sure can use O/A if you want. A friend of mine bult his own Ultralight. Believe he used TIG.

                    Two things I remember from my O/A class:

                    A constant stream of "TORCH POPS" coming from all the O/A work stations. School had old Harris torches in need of refurb, combined with inexperienced ops using them.

                    Instructor showing us how he welded with O/A. His welds from an O/A torch look so flawless it almost brough a tear to your eye. I'm not kidding, they looked like stacked dimes. But he was a 30 year veteran of welding and a genius with torch, or just about anything weldable you put in his hands.

                    One of the things that was most valuable to me was brazing. Read an article somewhere about the adhesion strength of brazing VS welding. It's amazing how strong brazing is. I use it a lot when I don't use TIG.

                    Have fun! Learn well! Ask questions.

                    -prowess

                    Hobart StickMate LX 235 AC/DC
                    Hobart Handler 125 EZ
                    Hobart Handler 187
                    Champion 4500
                    Mag-Power MP 55 Plasma
                    Lincoln Precision TIG 185
                    Smith O/A

                    Clarke 95e

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by prowess View Post
                      Good thread.

                      Interesting. Well good luck on building an aircraft. If I were going to build my own aircraft, I'd sure be on top of my form when I did !
                      Personally, I'd use my TIG setup for that, but you sure can use O/A if you want. A friend of mine bult his own Ultralight. Believe he used TIG.

                      Two things I remember from my O/A class:

                      A constant stream of "TORCH POPS" coming from all the O/A work stations. School had old Harris torches in need of refurb, combined with inexperienced ops using them.

                      Instructor showing us how he welded with O/A. His welds from an O/A torch look so flawless it almost brough a tear to your eye. I'm not kidding, they looked like stacked dimes. But he was a 30 year veteran of welding and a genius with torch, or just about anything weldable you put in his hands.

                      One of the things that was most valuable to me was brazing. Read an article somewhere about the adhesion strength of brazing VS welding. It's amazing how strong brazing is. I use it a lot when I don't use TIG.

                      Have fun! Learn well! Ask questions.

                      -prowess

                      You would be supprized how much better a not-so-pretty oa weld on 4130 can be then a perfect looking TIG. Looks can be very decieving.

                      -Aaron
                      "Better Metalworking Through Research"

                      Miller Dynasty 300DX
                      Miller Dynasty 200DX
                      Miller Spectrum 375 extreme
                      Miller Millermatic Passport

                      Smith, Meco, Harris, Victor, Prest-o-lite, Marquette and even a Dillon O/A torch

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        O/A welds

                        Looks always comes up with a weld and honestly I only worry about my puddle control and heat. Everything else just falls into place after that. As far as the "stacked dimes" look that everyone likes, I personally try to keep it as smooth as I can, if you want to get technical about it I would think that a smooth bead versus a large "string of dimes" would distribute stresses better.

                        Filler rods, there seems to be two different kinds in the tube for the O/A booths. "R45 1/16" on one sideof the stamp "X95305" on the other; 1/16 inch obviously, copper washed, and these seem to melt easier. The other looks like "A5 2 R45", again 1/16 inch, copper washed, but these seem like they need more heat to melt and don't flow as well, they don't like to wet out.

                        Only thing I've done lately in class are lap joints which are about as hard as I thought, heat moves differently in each plate and puddle control is tricky. It does help that I made a double ended welding finger, one end pointed the other end's shape is a secret. More on that later.

                        If I had the time I would have welded the sucker here at home, cept I'm out of C25 because I think somebody paranoid about my tank (who I won't name) torqued the tank valve and might have messed up the seat. I have had that tank for a year so between my mom cleaning up her part of the garage I think I lost the tank cap. A year might be enough to loose the pressure combined with intermittent use and normal tightness on that valve. I've only ever left the tank open overnight twice so I don't think that would do it.

                        So I thought, no gas I can go flux core but I didn't have the patience or time to change the rolls. Ok I can tack it with my cheap stick welder. Stick welders plug is being used as an extension cord/ adapter cord for the MIG, great. I have 1/2 inch rebar that I'm going to have to weld at school, largest tip we are currently allowed to use not that anyone does is a #3. Took so much longer and was so much hotter than it needed to be. And torch is awful for thick work that needs to be tacked. No wonder its a dying process...dying not dead.
                        Son of usmcpop. Lincoln SP175+, Miller Syncrowave 250, Miller Dialarc 250 AC/DC, Victor O/A, Index 745 Mill, Clausing 5904 lathe, Harbor Freight 8x12 lathe.

                        Accurate is a relative term...right?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          That's a good point.

                          I never really thought about strength of O/A VS TIG.
                          Interesing.

                          I agree with the previous posts. I try for good looking welds in my shop when I am doing metal art, or just goofing around. It's a hobby for me at times. I always admire pretty welds. Not saying that they are BETTER, just like the art form of the fluid lines.

                          IF I am going for, say, welding a repair on my muffler system? Anything strong works!

                          -prowess

                          Hobart StickMate LX 235 AC/DC
                          Hobart Handler 125 EZ
                          Hobart Handler 187
                          Champion 4500
                          Mag-Power MP 55 Plasma
                          Lincoln Precision TIG 185
                          Smith O/A

                          Clarke 95e

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Considering that TIG arc temperatures can be, what, 3 times that of an Oxy/Acet flame, I can understand that bad stuff could happen.
                            --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

                            Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
                            -------------------------

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by tansit234 View Post
                              Looks always comes up with a weld and honestly I only worry about my puddle control and heat. Everything else just falls into place after that. As far as the "stacked dimes" look that everyone likes, I personally try to keep it as smooth as I can, if you want to get technical about it I would think that a smooth bead versus a large "string of dimes" would distribute stresses better.

                              Filler rods, there seems to be two different kinds in the tube for the O/A booths. "R45 1/16" on one sideof the stamp "X95305" on the other; 1/16 inch obviously, copper washed, and these seem to melt easier. The other looks like "A5 2 R45", again 1/16 inch, copper washed, but these seem like they need more heat to melt and don't flow as well, they don't like to wet out.

                              Only thing I've done lately in class are lap joints which are about as hard as I thought, heat moves differently in each plate and puddle control is tricky. It does help that I made a double ended welding finger, one end pointed the other end's shape is a secret. More on that later.

                              If I had the time I would have welded the sucker here at home, cept I'm out of C25 because I think somebody paranoid about my tank (who I won't name) torqued the tank valve and might have messed up the seat. I have had that tank for a year so between my mom cleaning up her part of the garage I think I lost the tank cap. A year might be enough to loose the pressure combined with intermittent use and normal tightness on that valve. I've only ever left the tank open overnight twice so I don't think that would do it.

                              So I thought, no gas I can go flux core but I didn't have the patience or time to change the rolls. Ok I can tack it with my cheap stick welder. Stick welders plug is being used as an extension cord/ adapter cord for the MIG, great. I have 1/2 inch rebar that I'm going to have to weld at school, largest tip we are currently allowed to use not that anyone does is a #3. Took so much longer and was so much hotter than it needed to be. And torch is awful for thick work that needs to be tacked. No wonder its a dying process...dying not dead.
                              R45??? We got a batch of that once when the weld shop confused it with RG-45. Same base filler ( drawn iron wire ) but the r45 has deoxidizers in it for TIG. Try to get your hand on RG-45 for practice, it will treat you very well.

                              Temp has a part to do in the 4130 issue, rapid cooling is the biggie though. Oh well.

                              Have fun!

                              -Aaron
                              "Better Metalworking Through Research"

                              Miller Dynasty 300DX
                              Miller Dynasty 200DX
                              Miller Spectrum 375 extreme
                              Miller Millermatic Passport

                              Smith, Meco, Harris, Victor, Prest-o-lite, Marquette and even a Dillon O/A torch

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X