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    I google my ?n but didn't find my particular problem. I'm putting together my new 210 MVP and noticed the sleeve that goes towards the feed roller isn't in tight. I fed the wire through like I would the 140 and after setting tension flipped the release and tried to backroll the wire sticking out but the sleeve moved back towards the roller also. Is the brass piece with the oring dose to move on and out? Is it suppose to be threaded in place? tia!
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  • #2
    IT should push in to major collar on brass piece (red arrow) seats against the wire feeder body and the set screw should lock in to groove in body (blue arrow) .... You might be feeling resistance from "O" ring and its keeping you from just pushing it home and seating properly....

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    "Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson..

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    • #3
      What I'm talking about is the sleeve holder. See where there is that oring. Should that be screwed in. There is nothing holding it there. Y the oring then? If I have to screw it in then will I have to reverse twist it first?
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      • #4
        Originally posted by roc2it View Post
        What I'm talking about is the sleeve holder. See where there is that oring. Should that be screwed in. There is nothing holding it there. Y the oring then? If I have to screw it in then will I have to reverse twist it first?
        I would think so.... It appears it locks the liner into the brass body that insets into the feeder assembly...

        Dale
        Last edited by Dale M.; 04-26-2021, 09:01 PM.
        "Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson..

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        • #5
          I will try to find time to try it tomorrow. I'm working 12.5 hour shifts and building my first welding cart. Busy work but I think it will pay off in the end. Thanks

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          • #6
            Dale thank you for the help. It was a bugger to get in there but I got it. The welder is put together. The cart got finished up today. Now on to the electrical hook up
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            • #7
              Kool.........

              Dale
              "Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson..

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              • #8
                roc2it: First, welcome to the forum. Lots of incisive thinkers regularly peruse this site. They can help solve problems. Second, nice looking cart. I'm not sure, though, that allowing the sparks and effluent from the chop saw to spray all over the welder and stored side-winder angle-grinder is a good idea in the long run. Allowing this electrically conductive "dust" to spray onto and eventually get into these complex (expensive) electrical tools will eventually cause short circuits, rough bearings, and shortened lifespan. You could build a shield to deflect the dust, but in my opinion, the best way to deal with it would be to separate the cutting process from the electrical tool storage. ~0le
                "If a problem can't be solved, enlarge it." (The 34th president of the United States)

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                • #9
                  Agreed. Saws and grinders stay as well away from other equipment as possible.

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