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  • Grounding the machine itself

    Howdy,

    So my garage has only none grounded outlets though it does have a 20 amp dedicated circuit on 12 gauge wire for the garage door opener (which I don't use). There are also floor drains that go at least 15 feet underground are also unused as the cistern to which they were connected has long been filled in. So here is my question. If I ran a 12 gauge wire from one of those floor drains to the grounding screw on the outlet would that be adequate? Could I just ground the case of a Handler 140 directly? If not it will be costly and difficult pull and I might as have 220 installed.

  • #2
    Unless your equipment grounding conductor goes directly to the neutral buss of your service panel or grounding buss of a subpanel, you need to do a resistance test of whatever "building steel" or metallic plumbing you think you have access to to make sure it is a low-resistance path back to one of those known good "grounds." You need an electrical chassis ground bonded to a service transformer neutral, not just something in good contact with the physical earth.
    Last edited by MAC702; 01-02-2021, 11:58 AM. Reason: spelling

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    • #3
      Personally I would have a bit of rewiring done and bring it up to code for grounding..... Being safe is no accident....Haywire and Rube Goldberg wiring schemes have a way of coming back to bite you....

      Dale


      "Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson..

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      • #4
        As a good background discussion of the theory behind grounding, see this great video. It cleared up a few things for me.

        Some of the crap to keep me busy

        Millermatic 211 Mig
        Hypertherm Powermax 30 plasma cutter
        Everlast 200DX
        Lincoln Weld-Pak 100
        Century Stick welder
        Oxy set-up with Henrob 2000 torch
        Logan 200 lathe (60 years old)
        Jet band saw
        About 6 Harbor Freight grinders with different discs/wheels/brushes

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        • #5
          I am kind of surprised Mac didn't elaborate further but doesn't the circuit have a ground wire? If I'd doesn't gfci is a good way. You do NOT run a wire to the earth for electric ground of the machine. An electric ground is continuous back to service neutral main.
          http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Joe from NY View Post
            As a good background discussion of the theory behind grounding, see this great video. It cleared up a few things for me.

            Good video... Answered issues of grounding on my portable generator, which some one (previous owner) had added a chassis ground to be clamped to ground rod at meter panel, that was wrong and totally unnecessary....

            Dale
            "Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson..

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Sberry View Post
              I am kind of surprised Mac didn't elaborate further but doesn't the circuit have a ground wire? If I'd doesn't gfci is a good way. You do NOT run a wire to the earth for electric ground of the machine. An electric ground is continuous back to service neutral main.
              I'd elaborate more if I was training an electrician, and thought he was describing an older 2-wire circuit with no grounding conductor. But you do make a very good point about using a GFCI receptacle if there is no way to properly get a grounding wire added to the circuit. While some equipment needs the grounding conductor as a reference, I doubt even a modern welding machine is one of them. My mind at the time was still on the mode of a physical grounding conductor.

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              • #8
                Nothing is as good as a new wire continuous from the panel to an outlet. It's almost automatic reflex for me to consider the circuit or to run a new wire for new equipment. Not a big fan of daisy chains for heavier tools, heaters either.
                http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Sberry View Post
                  Nothing is as good as a new wire continuous from the panel to an outlet. ...
                  Actually, if a circuit is run in metallic conduit, the conduit is a better grounding conductor than the green wire that becomes optional. But I know that's not what you're talking about. Yes, we would much prefer a real electrical path to the panel, preferably run with the power conductors.

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                  • #10
                    I was pretty sure you knew that I knew that you knew.
                    http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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