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  • Hobart handler 190

    I have some 1/4" steel parts I want to weld to 3/8" parts being used on a tractors rear 3 point hitch ( so it will be exposed to some stress)
    what is a better method( fcaw or gmaw ) and what machine setting would be best to join these 2 different thicknesses of steel to provide the best weld?
    Thanks for your time, Matt

  • #2
    Some tips I've read include preheating the thicker material to get better penetration on the 3/8"?
    ive also watched videos on it and I would only preheat the 3/8" ( not the 1/4") and it should be preheated to somewhere around 150°f?
    Thanks Matt

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    • #3
      Hunt4weld, Preheat can definitely help, I would get some good fluxcore wire like Fabshield 21B and take a look at the spec sheet to get an idea of settings. When actually making the weld try and favor the thicker piece of material, that will help with penetration and also help avoid burning through the thinner material.

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      • #4
        Ok thanks for the info
        .035 wire or something else?

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        • #5
          I see looking at my hh190 specs it can run .045 wire( what application is this larger wire good for?)
          im getting some material to fix my tractor tomorrow ( maybe do some test fcaw over weekend on thicker/ 2-different thickness metals to get a feel for it first...)
          Thanks guys, Matt

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Hunt4weld View Post
            Some tips I've read include preheating the thicker material to get better penetration on the 3/8"?
            ive also watched videos on it and I would only preheat the 3/8" ( not the 1/4") and it should be preheated to somewhere around 150°f?
            Thanks Matt
            If you are doing multiple passes on 3/8 " material, and the ambient temperature is higher than 50-60 deg. F, it is likely that no preheat is required, and that joint prep is far more important. The inter-pass temperature of the parent material will likely reach far higher than 150 deg.F. Preheat might help on the root-pass.
            Last edited by Northweldor; 07-09-2020, 10:58 AM.

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            • #7
              https://www.wcwelding.com/joint-prep...n%20is%20bad). This is a pretty good resource for joint prep info

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              • #8
                Compared to a self shielded wire an ER70S-6 solid wire weld with C25 shield gas is gonna have superior mechanical properties.
                MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
                Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


                PM 180C



                HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Hunt4weld View Post
                  I see looking at my hh190 specs it can run .045 wire( what application is this larger wire good for?)
                  im getting some material to fix my tractor tomorrow ( maybe do some test fcaw over weekend on thicker/ 2-different thickness metals to get a feel for it first...)
                  Thanks guys, Matt
                  While it is possible to run .045 wire, you would also be dealing with a 10-15% duty cycle and little room to increase heat, if needed, with that larger harder to melt wire.

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                  • #10
                    Ok good to know( larger the wire=lower duty cycle)
                    got it thanks.
                    What's the application it's best for (.045)

                    Is that info somewhere( wire size / duty cycle relationship)?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Hunt4weld View Post
                      Ok good to know( larger the wire=lower duty cycle)
                      got it thanks.
                      What's the application it's best for (.045)

                      Is that info somewhere( wire size / duty cycle relationship)?
                      That isn't really the information you want, since setting your machine correctly should depend on the thickness of material you want to weld and the amperage range of the wire required for that thickness. Here is a Miller article with an approximate table used to figure amperage range for wire-size,( but I think I recall a better one from ESAB):

                      https://www.millerwelds.com/resource...ect-parameters

                      If you want the duty-cycle relationship, you can get that easily, by checking the Volt-Amp curves in your manual.

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                      • #12
                        Gotcha, thanks

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Dan View Post
                          Compared to a self shielded wire an ER70S-6 solid wire weld with C25 shield gas is gonna have superior mechanical properties.
                          Not necessarily. Thats going to entirely depend on what self shielded wire you're comparing it with. Fabshield 21B typically has better tensile strength but lower yeild when compared to Quantum Arc 6 (ER70S-6). It's really going to depend on what exactly you need mechanically.

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                          • #14
                            I'm looking to weld some 3/8" plate to 3"square tubing(1/4" thick) to go onto my rear top link 3 point tractor hitch to make a boom pole to pick up heavy things around our hobby farm( I know I can buy one that's a true 3point connection but it's an old tractor without modern connection points)
                            probably lifting around 3-400lbs typically...
                            The 3" square arm is 90" long so I plan on welding some 3" "c" (3/16") ontop to make it more rigid.
                            I've seen this same design in action built the same way so I know it'll be strong enough once I make decisions on either gmaw or fcaw these together.
                            I'm going to try and sketch up what the main weld I'm referring to is going to look like so hopefully you can see what I'm trying to build.
                            Thanks Matt

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                            • #15
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