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Is a spool gun mandatory?

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  • #31
    Nipper.....I'm kinda like you.....I switch on my 210, make some adjustments, and start welding.....it sounds like bacon and melts things together and all is good......then I move on to the next project......I have no idea what process was used.....spray, glob, short circuit or whatever.....I'm good as long as it works.....sometimes being ignorant is a blessing.....lol

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    • #32
      Well Nipper, what you have to do is compare, generalize, and accept the differences for the titles bestowed upon them. The spray comes from the sound. An engine idling might sound lumpy (Short circuit transfer) but as it picks up revs smoothens out. Rev it fast enough... In this case droplets are melting so fast and rapidly, they are smaller then the size of the wire as well doing so with such speed as to appear in a stream giving the hiss of smoother higher rev. They are said to be spraying across the arc.

      Besides that, the term is used in description of other processes. Some SMAW electrode are said to spray. FCAW wires types, same thing. GMAW solid wires and you with solid GMAW of aluminum, same thing. And it's complicated.

      On the bright side, when you figure it out it, you'll know.
      My last description...Looks like a cats urine stream in the middle of brightness, sounds about the same as well if you ever seen a cat pee? Like Spiderman shooting a web. Phisssst.

      Good luck with that.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Rangerhgm View Post
        Nipper.....I'm kinda like you.....I switch on my 210, make some adjustments, and start welding.....it sounds like bacon and melts things together and all is good......then I move on to the next project......I have no idea what process was used.....spray, glob, short circuit or whatever.....I'm good as long as it works.....sometimes being ignorant is a blessing.....lol
        I'm with you Ranger. I'll wait till Hobart adds a button!

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        • #34
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gTFhh8dAK10

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=LMnRRx1popU

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvDrlyl9xlo

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iNaAAMtTh1g

          Just remember the learning is out there, but you do have to want it. Knowing why and understanding it, not for everyone. Doing works and is the future. Called task specific training.
          But it sure looks cool in slow motion.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Nipper View Post

            I'm with you Ranger. I'll wait till Hobart adds a button!

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            LOL.....I like your puc

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            • #36
              Originally posted by oldguyfrom56 View Post
              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gTFhh8dAK10

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=LMnRRx1popU

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvDrlyl9xlo

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iNaAAMtTh1g

              Just remember the learning is out there, but you do have to want it. Knowing why and understanding it, not for everyone. Doing works and is the future. Called task specific training.
              But it sure looks cool in slow motion.
              GOOD JOB Oldguy!!!

              I just watched the slo mo videos. I thought that's what was going on when I was welding, so then I looked up one that shows "regular" welding in slo mo ~~> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRIGks3gxG0

              I see now! : )

              Thank you Sir!

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              • #37
                Yup, shows the difference. I would suggest that in the video you posted, the voltage was a bit high. Notice how large the droplet was getting? Can you picture how positive and negative electrons might be effecting things and magnetic fields might function for cause and effect?
                As you mention, once was blind but now you see.
                Good! Your welcome. Worth the effort.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Nipper View Post
                  ... I wouldn't know I was spraying even if I was....
                  If you can't tell, you ain't. Trust me, you'll know.

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                  • #39
                    Its good to know, but..... I don't think I will be buying special gas to try it. I'll let Ranger go first. : D

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by MAC702 View Post
                      I have sprayed with my HH210. Not aluminum, but it looks like the thread has moved beyond that. It was during the first year I owned it and was purposely doing some testing with it. I used a C3 shielding gas, and .023" solid steel wire. C3 is 97% argon, 3% CO2
                      I have always assumed that the H210 had the voltage to spray arc both steel and aluminum at least in the smaller wire gages, using a spool gun and and argon, but now I'm not so sure. I took a look at the volt/amp curve charts of the H190 , H210, and Ironman 230. , to see what the voltage would be for .030 aluminum at 90 amps (minimum amperage for spray in the ESAB chart I listed earlier).

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                      As you can see, on the 190 at 90 Amps with argon, the voltage is at about 23 or 24, which is barely enough to transition into spray, and might still stay in globular without another mix of gas.


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                      On the H210 the situation is slightly better, since at 90 amps ,you have about 26 volts, which should get you out of globular transfer, with a little to spare, but still
                      may not be enough to spray with . 045 wire.




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                      On the Ironman, you still have enough voltage to maintain spray aluminum right up to up to the amperage required for all wire sizes it will feed.

                      So, back to the original question, I think a spool gun is mandatory for aluminum with the 210, because you need every advantage you can get to get quality welds with the low voltage you have.

                      I checked with a friend who does marine aluminum, and he says he uses MAC 702's choice of gas but, for the hobbyist or the pro who switches back and forth,
                      92/8 will work well with short circuit steel or spray aluminum. Also, to repair really thin material, he simply adds thickness where needed, backing bars, patches, etc

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                      • #41
                        Hmmmmm...

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