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Does a 240V welder work better than 120V on thin steel?

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  • Does a 240V welder work better than 120V on thin steel?

    I may need to buy a new welder for my garage. I have only ever used a HH135 and I have never needed to weld anything thicker than 3/16". I was wondering if a 240V MIG welder might perform better than a 120V even on steel that the 120V is rated to handle or would I just be wasting money on a MIG that is over rated for what I do? For example, buy a HH140 since it should do the job or buy a 210MVP to do the same job? Adding 240V outlet is not an issue.

  • #2
    For practical purposes, I wouldn't say it would do it any better. But it won't do it any worse, and there are other things you might want the capability for that the bigger machines also offer. There's the obvious extra power when you DO want to weld something thicker, and that day WILL come. They will have a higher duty cycle if you are doing a LOT of small stuff. And you might get a model with a spoolgun option which can be handy even if you don't do aluminum.

    The smaller machine will do what you need, however, and will be more portable.

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    • #3
      If you weld anything more than sheet metal the higher duty cycle will help a lot. I can remember using a buddy of mine 135. We built receiver mounted ice chest and rod holders for the beach. When I had to weld the receiver part it took forever and I was not happy with it in the end. I welded mine again with a 220v welder. My friend kept his as is. I was in the middle of stringing new 6 gauge wire at my house so we used my buddies welder thinking it was a small project.

      I just bought a 210MVP to run thin wire for a higher duty cycle. I have a 250 amp machine for .030 and .035 wire. I did not want to buy another gun with the correct liner size and new rollers. I also don't have the adapter for my Hobart 250 amp welder to run small spools of wire. I would have to buy a large spool of .023 wire. It seemed simpler to have another welder and the cost difference between a 120v and a small 220v much not much different this Christmas. Hobart had a $100 rebate and IOC had half priced helmets if you bought a new welder so I got my new Lincoln helmet basically free.
      Last edited by coxhaus; 02-01-2019, 12:30 AM.
      Hobart beta-mig 2510 Mig welder
      Victor OA Welding/Cutting Rig
      Century 295 amp Stick welder bought 30+ years ago

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      • #4
        You can turn a bigger welder down but you can't turn a smaller one up.
        Blacksmith
        Stickmate LX AC/DC
        Big cheap (Chinese) Anvil
        Hand cranked coal forge
        Freon bottle propane forge
        HH 210 and bottle of C25

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        • #5
          A lot will depend on machine.... BIG welder may not go down to where SMALLER machine can, heat wise the smaller welder may be better on thin stuff.... And skill of person doing the welds...
          Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by craigrad View Post
            I may need to buy a new welder for my garage. I have only ever used a HH135 and I have never needed to weld anything thicker than 3/16". I was wondering if a 240V MIG welder might perform better than a 120V even on steel that the 120V is rated to handle or would I just be wasting money on a MIG that is over rated for what I do? For example, buy a HH140 since it should do the job or buy a 210MVP to do the same job? Adding 240V outlet is not an issue.
            ,
            I checked the Volt-Amp curves for the Hobart 140 and 210 MVP, and actually, the 210 will turn down to a slightly lower amperage than the 140, on either 110 v or 220 v. The difference is shown as 10 amps, but that is just one division on the graphs, and it's the same on tap 1 for both voltages. Not what you would expect!
            I doubt that there would be a noticeable difference that couldn't be compensated by varying stick-out.

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