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Learning to Use Hobart Handler 190 Mig Welder

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  • Learning to Use Hobart Handler 190 Mig Welder

    My first successful weld isn't pretty but it's functional. This trailer's guard rails are assembled from 3/4" NPT pipes (galvanized). A close nipple un-threaded at one corner. After grinding away the zinc, I stich-welded around the butted pieces. Two stub-outs/bird's nests later... Welded Elbows

  • #2
    Well done! What process and wire were you using? BTW, "functional" IS "pretty."

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    • #3
      Thanks for the encouragement! Hobart 0.030" flux-cored wire E71T-11. #4 voltage setting 60 IPM wire speed.

      This was an open butt weld. I clamped the pipe elbow and pipe Tee together with a large-jawed Vice grip; sandwiching a length of stranded copper wire between the jaws and work pieces. The jaws and copper bridged between the respective pipe fittings so the wire would arc and fuse to both pieces. The ground clamp was affixed to the Vice grips handle.

      I welded between the opened jaws then repositioned the Vice grip on the work piece a bit and welded some more. That's why the weld has a lot of stops and starts. The last weld stitch was upside-down which caused the second bird's nest at the wire feed rollers.

      The bird's nests occurred when the wire failed to arc and I didn't release the gun's trigger fast enough. I learned to wire brush the weld between each successive start/stop sequence to minimize arc-failures.


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      • #4
        In future skip the copper wire........ Ground clamp on one side is usually sufficient and once you strike arc and pull (drag) it to other side of work you have a continuity bond to other side once it tacks... Providing you have clean mate surfaces...

        And yes with fluxcore (FCAW) you have to clean slag from joint before trying to weld over previous welds.... The beauty of solid wire and shield gas (GMAW) is no flux/slag to get in way and you can go back over boo-boo in one sweep... And no real clean up but maybe a few BB...

        I was working some really thin stock Sunday and blew a couple of holes (#1 step with HH140) ..Just snuck back and did a few short arcs to plug holes and life was good.... Once you get used to GMAW you get spoiled and only resort to FCAW in extreme conditions (dirty material - breezy location)

        Dale
        Last edited by Dale M.; 01-28-2019, 08:47 PM.
        Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

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        • #5
          Click image for larger version  Name:	image_39120.jpg Views:	12 Size:	41.1 KB ID:	703749Click image for larger version  Name:	channels 1.jpg Views:	8 Size:	44.2 KB ID:	703751Two channels were placed side-by-side. I started on right side with a tack weld then welded from right to left. Weld heat distortion caused misalignment; opening a small gap which I couldn't bridge. I tried making a weld-overlay to narrow the gap then it just melted through.

          Maybe I should have waited for it to cool down before attempting to do the overlay?

          Channels are 0.125" thickness mild steel. Hobart 0.030" flux-cored wire E71T-11, #4 voltage setting 60 IPM wire speed.
          Last edited by Badbmwbrad; 02-11-2019, 08:19 PM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Badbmwbrad View Post
            Click image for larger version

Name:	image_39120.jpg
Views:	347
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ID:	703749Click image for larger version

Name:	channels 1.jpg
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ID:	703751 Two channels were placed side-by-side. I started on right side with a tack weld then welded from right to left. Weld heat distortion caused misalignment; opening a small gap which I couldn't bridge. I tried making a weld-overlay to narrow the gap then it just melted through.

            Maybe I should have waited for it to cool down before attempting to do the overlay?

            Channels are 0.125" thickness mild steel. Hobart 0.030" flux-cored wire E71T-11, #4 voltage setting 60 IPM wire speed.
            Did you have a tack on both ends? Have you looked at the WT&T basic videos?

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            • #7
              I love Welding Tips and Tricks! Tack welded right end only.
              Last edited by Badbmwbrad; 02-11-2019, 08:20 PM.

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              • #8
                One tack welds "all points" if there is any place to pull a way or separate....

                Dale
                Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Click image for larger version  Name:	Ground Straps.jpg Views:	1 Size:	60.7 KB ID:	703762At Welding Tips and Tricks, Jody recommends stuffing a length of stranded copper wire beneath the work piece ground clamp. These braided ground straps were fashioned with stranded copper conductors I salvaged from the pigtail leads of graphite brushes (motor-generator set brushes).

                  Last edited by Badbmwbrad; 02-12-2019, 09:09 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Badbmwbrad View Post
                    Click image for larger version Name:	Ground Straps.jpg Views:	1 Size:	60.7 KB ID:	703762At Welding Tips and Tricks, Jody recommends stuffing a length of stranded copper wire beneath the work piece ground clamp. These braided ground straps were fashioned with stranded copper conductors I salvaged from the pigtail leads of graphite brushes (motor-generator set brushes).

                    Jody is good... But... Never found that necessary if you hit a portion of metal with flap wheel to get clean shiny bright place to put ground clamp....

                    Big issue I see is you are not paying good attention to your weave and maybe tying to weld a little cold....

                    Dale
                    Last edited by Dale M.; 02-13-2019, 09:23 AM.
                    Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

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                    • #11
                      Those fittings weld terrible anyway. They are cast and or hi carbon crappy forgings, they are highly unreliable in structural work, do not trust them.
                      http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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                      • #12
                        Click image for larger version  Name:	Angle2.jpg Views:	0 Size:	50.3 KB ID:	703813A pair of 5/16" steel plates were placed 90 degrees apart and welded together for practice. My Hobart 190 doesn't show a recommended voltage/wire feed speed for 0.030" E71T-11 wire so I left it on #4 voltage and 60% wire speed which are settings for 1/8" thick steel.

                        Both ends were tack-welded as recommended. After making the first weld pass on both sides, the joint was now ~1/4" thick so I reset the welder to 6/40. Heretofore, I pushed the torch but decided to drag the torch which actually made it easier to see the puddle. The generator sure made some noise at these settings and my hand was getting hot even through the insulated leather glove. This is fun!

                        The Hobart manual states "Wire speed (amperage) controls weld penetration (wire speed = burn-off rate)". I thought the voltage setting controlled amperage. Would someone please explain how wire feed speed affects amperage?
                        Click image for larger version  Name:	Angle1.jpg Views:	0 Size:	49.4 KB ID:	703812
                        Last edited by Badbmwbrad; 02-17-2019, 06:51 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Its getting better (second picture) .... Using fluxcore wire (FCAW) you always drag the wire along weld......

                          Dale


                          Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

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                          • #14
                            "Would someone please explain how wire feed speed affects amperage?"

                            By effect. Adding more or less wire effects things. Like moving faster or slower. Harder or softer. Colder or hotter. Those kind of effects.

                            I took the liberty to color your picture. Yup...making progress. Tightening the step of progression will go along way toward filling the empty spaces.

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                            • #15
                              Thanks. I appreciate your tips and advice.

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