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Manual for Beta-Mig 200

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  • Manual for Beta-Mig 200

    I saw on some other posts that someone could possibly email a copy of a Beta-Mig 200 manual. Just picked up one and I'd like some good reading. Thank you!

  • #2
    What is your unit SPEC number?

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    • #3
      I'll have to check on that when I actually pick it up. A friend got it for me and I was curious to learn more before I get it.

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      • #4
        Jdslednut, Welcome to the forum. You realize that those old Beta-Migs had a constant current transformer . . . right?
        Won't make any difference while you are learning, but you won't want to do any seismic or other critical work with it. ~0le
        "If a problem can't be solved, enlarge it." (The 34th president of the United States)

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        • #5
          The BetaMIG units were CV(constant voltage) machines designed for MIG welding. They were a tapped transformer with CV output, not CC(constant current).

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          • #6
            Keith, you are right I am wrong. I consulted with my electronics-expert brother and he clarified what he told me 10 years ago when I was working for a fellow who had a Beta MIG 200 Here is his clarification. I apologize for promulgating incorrect information. ~0le

            I believe I have (finally) grasped the design differences between CC welding supplies (I've built several), and I now believe I thoroughly understand the differences between CC principles of operation and the operating principles of CV. In practical application I was looking for electronic equivalencies, and never seeing them. A "run of the mill" 12-volt power supply is a constant-voltage supply. I believe I was looking for better "voltage regulation" than provided by a transformer alone, which can actually provide approx 3 to 5 % voltage regulation (no-load to full-load). A DC power supply that provides 5% regulation is pretty crappy, regulation-wise! In the world of electronic power supplies, good regulation is listed in milli-volts of change, no-load to full-load, which is accomplished through output being sampled, compared to a stable reference, and then changes made to the drive of the active device(s) to maintain the desired output voltage. When I would look at a schematic of a CV welder, I saw NONE of that going on. However, I didn't pay attention to the fact that I DIDN'T see the current-limiting variable inductance (or the equivalent thereof) in either the secondary or primary circuit, or built into the transformer via adjustable magnetic coupling that would vary the ability of a load on the secondary to be reflected to the primary.
            My problem was, I was expecting a much more complex design than I ever saw, and now after doing some more research, looking at a half-dozen Hobart, Lincoln , and Miller welder schematics, I concluded that the transformer's tendency to "regulate," must be sufficient regulation for CV welding.In the world of inverter-based welders, I'm sure they are actively regulating voltage, or current, according to the desired output setting.
            I can sure see the advantage of a wire-feed "spit welder" when there is a sizable amount of filler metal to lay down. I watched a YouTube of chuckE2009 build a 50-ton hydraulic press, and later several towable barbecue grills (lots of rain lately), and they would have taken him forever with stick!
            I probably can't justify a spit welder in my near future, but maybe in time . . . . Perhaps even a plasma cutter in the far far-off future. Love, Jeff
            "If a problem can't be solved, enlarge it." (The 34th president of the United States)

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            • #7
              I have the 200 in my possession now and it is spec# 6331C 1

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Hobart Expert Keith View Post
                What is your unit SPEC number?
                6331C 1

                Thank you,
                Jeff

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                • #9
                  Check your email.

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                  • #10
                    Thanks a bunch!

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                    • #11
                      I’m in need of a manual or any info you might have on a beta-mig 250 spec# 7189 1 that I got it from my father.

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