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  • Ultimate Welder

    I recently bought a Hobart 190 as an upgrade to my Handler 100. I can tell you the 190 is daylight and dark difference compared to the 100. In doing research about the 190 I read reviews that said "nice smaller welder for someone who wants to learn to weld" and other similar things about this machine. These comments make me think well, what sort of capabilities and specifications should one look for once they have learned how to weld in a machine? Keep in mind I don't plan to ever do this for an income but for maintenance and light fabrication on my farm. Tell me what features and specs I might look for when and if I get ready to upgrade again... Thanks for your input.

  • #2
    Hang loose and wait till new inverter machines come out....Some of the stick machines have already hit marker, hopefully MIG will follow soon....

    Dale
    "Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson..

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    • #3
      Originally posted by bulldog7 View Post
      Tell me what features and specs I might look for when and if I get ready to upgrade again... Thanks for your input.
      Bulldog7...Let me ask a different question. You live in LA and want to go to New York, how do you get there? Do you fly out? Drive out? Take a bus perhaps? Maybe one foot in front of another?
      Some might say ask for directions first?

      You want, or you are welding on the farm. That to me is everything? Everything from a busted bailer to a broken rake. You bumped up to a 190 amps. Can you do more now?
      My bad... is it true what they say, mess with the bull and you get the horns? I think I'm messing with the bull here? Easy on the horns.

      SMAW is hands down the most versatile welding process. Your not doing it? Sold on wire feeding? What does GMAW/FCAW save? The time it takes to change rods?

      Have you heard the expression, it's not what you got, it's what you do with it?
      That 100 amp was small by all accounts. And I'm not going to say good or bad on the up grade, because as you know, it was a gooder.

      My recall of the early days was a bag of seed spread in a field by hand? Followed by a horse drawn contraption that dropped seeds. Then a tractor pulling a contraption that dropped seeds in many rows, and now, GPS tracking and something that air injects seeds? What the heck? Farming sure has gotten easier?

      So, you up graded to a 190. Day light and dark is the same as comparing a 100 watt bulb to a 190 watt bulb. One's brighter. Darker the night the brighter the light needed.

      But with all that said, Oxygen Acetylene Gas, AC Transformer SMAW were the staples of the farm. Why? Because of what you can do and could do with them. Cheap, affordably, and simple in operation. Coming from a guy who washes dishes by hand still, ask yourself what you need to do, want it to look like, are able to accomplish with further welding process improvement? What's the gain?

      Some apples are green, some are red, squish them they all make juice. Kind of like chickens...Knock the feathers off and other then size, who can tell? Could be a large pigeon being served? Lol, small drum sticks make me wonder?

      190 amps, that's a turkey. Serious drum sticks on that bird. 400 amps, that's an ostrich. More meat to chew for longer. Think it might also be tougher? Big old legs? Serious left overs from that big bird.

      So... when the tractor breaks in the field, portability is a nice feature to have? A longer extension cord is however also an option?

      LA to New York, over the mountains and in the direction the sun rises works. Not exactly a map, or taking into account method of travel, speed, comfort, time...but It'll get you there, with other factors affecting the travel, journey, and path to reaching the destination, specs and features.

      "These comments make me think well, what sort of capabilities and specifications should one look for once they have learned how to weld in a machine?"

      Most learn how to weld, long before they learn how the welding works...I'd start there. Back up a couple of steps. Read the owners manual. Visit the library for a comfortable chair and read a free book. You Tube maybe?

      But if you want my opinion on how to spend your money, how much can you afford to spend is a good starting point long before we worry about specs and features. LA to New York, what's the budget?

      Not the best of replies, but maybe a bit to chew on?














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      • #4
        Originally posted by Dale M. View Post
        Hang loose and wait till new inverter machines come out....Some of the stick machines have already hit marker, hopefully MIG will follow soon....

        Dale
        Inverter technology is well proven, although most likely this will include a shift from HD low frequency transformers, to voltage upping high frequency MOSFET’s...Machines will become lighter...the real benefit might be more bells and whistle options at the control panel...

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