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  • #31
    Originally posted by Dan View Post
    On the Hobart Handler 135, due to the design of the unit, when you make an adjustment to the voltage, it changes the rate that wire feeds for the same wire speed dial setting. So a wire speed dial setting of 20 is going to feed the wire at a faster rate with the voltage set to tap 2 then it does with the voltage set to tap 1
    Well Dan...I'm pretty sure I agree with that statement.
    However...while easy enough to find out, one two three seconds, on 4 settings, what does it mean in practical terms?

    How does a guy who knows that, tell a guy who doesn't what effect it has? Or all the effects it has?


    We see more wire. What's it doing?

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    • #32
      Originally posted by oldguyfrom56 View Post
      Well Dan...I'm pretty sure I agree with that statement.
      However...while easy enough to find out, one two three seconds, on 4 settings, what does it mean in practical terms?

      How does a guy who knows that, tell a guy who doesn't what effect it has? Or all the effects it has?


      We see more wire. What's it doing?
      You've got a tough job considering you're talking to a crowd with machines that have knobs and dials that have no real values shown other than 1,2,3,4 on one dial or 0 thru 10 and then 0 to 100 on another dial. Plus without time consuming and extensive measurements, and recording those, we have no way of knowing just what we are doing as we crank one or the other.

      My MM175 has the wire speed tracking thing Dan refers to except the voltage dial is continuous, not tapped. Bump the voltage up a touch and you've just bumped the wire feed speed up, like it or not. Bottom line, touch one knob and you've made two adjustments. Can get frustrating. At least my lincoln machine has real wire feed speeds on the feed speed dial. That helps.

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      • #33
        Good read. Note TRG-42 at about post number 20.

        https://weldtalk.hobartwelders.com/f...oes-what/page2

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Sandy View Post
          Good read. Note TRG-42 at about post number 20.

          https://weldtalk.hobartwelders.com/f...oes-what/page2
          4 pages of good reading. And fun to. Thumbs up!

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Sandy View Post

            You've got a tough job considering you're talking to a crowd with machines that have knobs and dials that have no real values shown other than 1,2,3,4 on one dial or 0 thru 10 and then 0 to 100 on another dial. Plus without time consuming and extensive measurements, and recording those, we have no way of knowing just what we are doing as we crank one or the other.

            My MM175 has the wire speed tracking thing Dan refers to except the voltage dial is continuous, not tapped. Bump the voltage up a touch and you've just bumped the wire feed speed up, like it or not. Bottom line, touch one knob and you've made two adjustments. Can get frustrating. At least my lincoln machine has real wire feed speeds on the feed speed dial. That helps.
            Between you and me, it almost doesn't matter. Until you go to bend a coupon. Then things matter. These by the way were fails. However, to a lessor standard, all three passed?

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            • #36
              I feel there is much play in how you utilize this machine. The settings suggested for 3/16th 5 tap 50 wire, is quite hot. Perhaps moving faster is needed, but I can't for the life of me get these nice rows, even remotely hinting at stacking dimes. I don't expect this, but with some cursive e's or repeat sideways checkmarks, ide hope to see one weave that looks differentiated. Idk, lol learning lots.
              This is my brothers truck, he's grinding there. This was a kit offered resulting in some big holes we filled with weld, where it really looks ugly. Raised areas are tacs we added to make sure no 90* plate edge was showing, that way there was blendable material without taking off the weld. pic looks like ****, but we cleaned it up nicely. It's all part of the learning experience I suppose haha.
              we turned down the machine to 3 35 wire and repeated tacs. This is by far the cleanest way I know to weld thus far. Everything on videos looks so slow, the i try and it looks like poo. Hahaha.

              anyway this post is to touch on where I got started on here, and to thank everyone for their advice, as well as patience. I was advised to stick around here to learn, which I have, will continue to do, and appreciate the wisdom of those that know much much more than I likely ever will.

              thank you all
              Attached Files
              Last edited by HOBARTxj; 03-20-2019, 06:15 AM.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by HOBARTxj View Post
                I feel there is much play in how you utilize this machine. The settings suggested for 3/16th 5 tap 50 wire, is quite hot. Perhaps moving faster is needed, but I can't for the life of me get these nice rows, even remotely hinting at stacking dimes. I don't expect this, but with some cursive e's or repeat sideways checkmarks, ide hope to see one weave that looks differentiated. Idk, lol learning lots.
                This is my brothers truck, he's grinding there. This was a kit offered resulting in some big holes we filled with weld, where it really looks ugly. Raised areas are tacs we added to make sure no 90* plate edge was showing, that way there was blendable material without taking off the weld. pic looks like ****, but we cleaned it up nicely. It's all part of the learning experience I suppose haha.
                we turned down the machine to 3 35 wire and repeated tacs. This is by far the cleanest way I know to weld thus far. Everything on videos looks so slow, the i try and it looks like poo. Hahaha.

                anyway this post is to touch on where I got started on here, and to thank everyone for their advice, as well as patience. I was advised to stick around here to learn, which I have, will continue to do, and appreciate the wisdom of those that know much much more than I likely ever will.

                thank you all
                Let me ask you, would you rather have a stack of dimes or a smooth layer of Ben Franklin's?
                Yup, that machine is capable of wonderful things. More you learn, the more you learn to use it.

                I had half a mind to discuss this WFS thing a bit further. I think the conversation is a little out of step in regards to step voltage/ variable voltage, and what the wire feed does as changes are made?

                However...
                for the record, and just my opinion going on record as saying it, in post #31 I posted a picture. M
                ore or less. The nozzle on a tube of chalking is tapered. cut the small tip and you get a small stream. Cut the wide end and you get a big stream. Now ask yourself a couple of questions. Which takes a greater pressure to squeeze? Consistently? Which for the squeeze releases more product? Which is easiest to squeeze? And while we're at it, do you force it in the corner or do you string it on top?
                Then ask do you want dimes or Ben Franklins?

                Teeter totter...volts and amps (WFS) . Which is the heavy end? You picture the simply teeter totter and think how that might fit, you'll begin to get this and what's going on. Because like it or not, when you change where the heavy sits, in or out on the board, or change the length of the board, where it pivots, the amount of heavy, that's physics and engineering. Look at you right. Get it for free right here. Getting smarter the hard way.

                You and other's will learn with us or in spite of us. Wisdom? Maybe?

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                • #38
                  Well while dimes are nice and bills are neat, really use just want a structurally sound weld. This just isn't going to cone without practice and learning, but I'm trying as I have opportunities. Ide prefer to learn from wisdom. Ive got some good tools and if applied right I might just get some wisdom of my own.

                  has anyone found the mvp210 to seem to like it's factory range settings. It gives a little leeway, but not much, perhaps my ignorance.

                  say it recommends 3/30 on a material thickness. 3/25-35 will fail one way or another pretty quick. A tad under or over can be turned, but not too much. Quite interesting seeing where it's happy.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by HOBARTxj View Post
                    Well while dimes are nice and bills are neat, really use just want a structurally sound weld. This just isn't going to cone without practice and learning, but I'm trying as I have opportunities. Ide prefer to learn from wisdom. Ive got some good tools and if applied right I might just get some wisdom of my own.

                    has anyone found the mvp210 to seem to like it's factory range settings. It gives a little leeway, but not much, perhaps my ignorance.

                    say it recommends 3/30 on a material thickness. 3/25-35 will fail one way or another pretty quick. A tad under or over can be turned, but not too much. Quite interesting seeing where it's happy.
                    If you really want to be expert in setting your machine, you need to practice all four factors in setting, so try varying your contact-to-work distance and your travel speed as well as your machine settings, But, only vary one factor at a time, and look at result.

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