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210mvp settings vs your own

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  • 210mvp settings vs your own

    Hi all,
    I've recently purchased a mvp210 and am running solid wire .030 with argon/co2 gas at 25cfh.
    I am fairly inexperienced welding so I figured this place had a lot of good suggestions on getting me started, so ide like hear from those that have used this unit.

    what do you find the settings to run like for yourselves?

    I had some 3/16" laying around that I ran some practice beads on in a few different settings, just to start getting a feel for the machine. Perhaps I'm ignorant, but I believe this machine to run fairly hot, anyone else agree and if so what do you like to adjust your settings to for wire speed/ voltage?

    typically faster/slower, hotter/cooler than factory settings...


    I'm going to try tacking up a car seat frame to repair it soon, quite thin material. I don't really have any of this material to practice on, any thoughts on a good setting?
    Last edited by HOBARTxj; 12-17-2018, 12:34 AM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by HOBARTxj View Post
    Hi all,
    I've recently purchased a mvp210 and am running solid wire .030 with argon/co2 gas at 25cfh.
    -Congratulations. I doubt you'll be disappointed.
    I am fairly inexperienced welding so I figured this place had a lot of good suggestions on getting me started, so ide like hear from those that have used this unit.
    -Rules me out? I have experience, and I have a lot of stuff, but I don't have one of those.
    what do you find the settings to run like for yourselves?
    -Isn't beauty in the eye of the beholder? W
    hat do the settings to run like for you?
    I had some 3/16" laying around that I ran some practice beads on in a few different settings, just to start getting a feel for the machine. Perhaps I'm ignorant, but I believe this machine to run fairly hot, anyone else agree and if so what do you like to adjust your settings to for wire speed/ voltage?
    -This sounds like a relationship evaluation moment. It's you.
    -Now...if you want to shorten the learning curve, it helps if you understand more clearly how they work together. As well the other components of the GMAW system.
    typically faster/slower, hotter/cooler than factory settings...
    -All of that and more at the control of your finger tips. That and how well you see and react to the moment.

    I'm going to try tacking up a car seat frame to repair it soon, quite thin material. I don't really have any of this material to practice on, any thoughts on a good setting?
    - When in doubt, the other seat is a best choice. As for settings...education is your best setting. As harsh as it sounds, I could say have you looked on the machine cover? Read the owners manual? Forum search for GMAW machine settings? Cause I haven't...could be some there though?
    What...you thought I was done? Old guy with a key board friend, not even close. However it's late and I'm tired.
    But in the spirit of Christmas, if no one comes along with specifics to make your Christmas special, I'll come back with some knowledge to pass along that might help. I'll be brief. Lol. Ho,Ho,Ho.

    Comment


    • #3
      The setting on door chart and in owners manual are just reference points to get you into ball park, they are not absolutes.... I usually put the amperage setting on what chart suggests (most of the time), but have had to dial in wire speed to fit most applications, usually chart is pretty close, experience will prove you with better setups as you weld more... Also be conscious of angle of gun is to weld and the weave of wire/weld, stick out, and how fast you move the bead along....

      Its all experience gained from practice, practice, practice....

      A good place to read/visualize and gain knowledge on the processes... http://weldingtipsandtricks.com

      Dale
      Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

      Comment


      • #4
        Please don't excuse questions here to be the lack of research, learning.

        ultimately time and practice will tell all, but I thought perhaps those that "Have" used this machine could offer up how they believe the relationship the factory settings have to real world use.
        I don't mean to disregard knowledgeable welders here. I just thought a generic question on how those that have used this particular machine, find the machine to run compared to the chart, would give me a starting point on gaining control. Let me be clear that by no means do I expect a printed chart to be the exact settings, but with a tapped voltage I figure many here would know wether they typically turn the heat up/ down, or not at all. perhaps they only adjust wire speed because they find the tap setting close enough. The relationship to the chart/ machine and real world use was a vague question, clearly because there's many factors in what your welding. In my case, material thickness mainly to heat, but in general those that have used this machine may have found the chart to be a good starting point, or maybe in their experience they've found themselves changing much.
        in all I wasn't looking for gmaw setting as there are a billion machines. I did however search on a forum for specific answers on a Hobart mvp 210. Hehehe

        anywho this guy answered,

        Dale pretty much nailed the question, it wasn't complicated haha, just vague.

        thanks for the link dale, I'll be reading through it and much more.

        I also saw a YouTube user weldingtipsandtricks had a lot of real-world examples of this machine, as well as a brief demonstration of my question.

        being a Hobart forum I'm still all ears, for those that have this machine and have anything they care to share about their experience on the map 210.


        thanks all for the help provided on here



        Last edited by HOBARTxj; 12-17-2018, 12:02 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          The level of your input voltage is going to influence the output power level of each tap. Meaning the output voltage and amperage for a tap will be higher with a 240 volt input then it will be with a 230 volt input. A person running a 210 MVP on a 240+ volt input may need to run the machine at lower tap settings then a person running the machine with an input voltage around 230.

          Also through years of experimenting with different brands of wire, on the 210 mvp, and other units, I've discovered that the wire speed value required for a voltage tap varies between brands of wire.
          MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
          Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


          PM 180C



          HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by HOBARTxj View Post
            Hi all,
            I've recently purchased a mvp210 and am running solid wire .030 with argon/co2 gas at 25cfh.
            I am fairly inexperienced welding so I figured this place had a lot of good suggestions on getting me started, so ide like hear from those that have used this unit.

            what do you find the settings to run like for yourselves?

            I had some 3/16" laying around that I ran some practice beads on in a few different settings, just to start getting a feel for the machine. Perhaps I'm ignorant, but I believe this machine to run fairly hot, anyone else agree and if so what do you like to adjust your settings to for wire speed/ voltage?

            typically faster/slower, hotter/cooler than factory settings...


            I'm going to try tacking up a car seat frame to repair it soon, quite thin material. I don't really have any of this material to practice on, any thoughts on a good setting?
            In addition to what Dale and Dan have stressed above:

            For your current priority (the seat frame repair), you should get practice material of the same thickness at your nearest junk yard, and use it to set your 210MVP in all FOUR aspects of machine setting, not just the 2 you set on the machine. These are Voltage range, Wire feed speed, Contact to work distance, and Travel speed.

            Practice making overlapping series of tack welds, varying ONE of these variables up or down at a time, until you understand the effect each has on the tack. Soon, you will be able to set the 2 machine variables, and the 2 operational values on other thicknesses and types of welds, with great accuracy

            Comment


            • #7
              Just because the Hornets nest doesn't look like it has much activity happening doesn't mean it isn't filled with Hornets. Some times you have to poke it to find out.

              So let's ask the question, if your going to poke the nest, do you think the size of stick makes a difference? How about the effort to poke? How about the weather when you do? One long poke or do you jab at it a bit? You going to be up close or far away?

              Give a man a fish he eats for a day, teach him to fish and he'll never go hungry.

              You want specifics to your mvp210, eat for the day. You learn what this stuff does, you'll never go hungry.

              Comment


              • #8
                Up close, and I choose jab with a big stick, a fallen tree maybe, in a thunderstorm with snow. I summon you BEE!
                Last edited by HOBARTxj; 12-18-2018, 02:48 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Dan View Post
                  The level of your input voltage is going to influence the output power level of each tap. Meaning the output voltage and amperage for a tap will be higher with a 240 volt input then it will be with a 230 volt input. A person running a 210 MVP on a 240+ volt input may need to run the machine at lower tap settings then a person running the machine with an input voltage around 230.

                  Also through years of experimenting with different brands of wire, on the 210 mvp, and other units, I've discovered that the wire speed value required for a voltage tap varies between brands of wire.
                  Dan thank you, I'm deffinetly running on 230V, however I've never thought of wire varying between brands, I'll deffinetly read up on this!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Northweldor View Post

                    In addition to what Dale and Dan have stressed above:

                    For your current priority (the seat frame repair), you should get practice material of the same thickness at your nearest junk yard, and use it to set your 210MVP in all FOUR aspects of machine setting, not just the 2 you set on the machine. These are Voltage range, Wire feed speed, Contact to work distance, and Travel speed.

                    Practice making overlapping series of tack welds, varying ONE of these variables up or down at a time, until you understand the effect each has on the tack. Soon, you will be able to set the 2 machine variables, and the 2 operational values on other thicknesses and types of welds, with great accuracy
                    Great advice sir, I choose to jump in head first and try my luck on the repair. It was a great project to try out, and I did use tacks in a row to complete the job. After having done this I will deffinetly be practicing tacks while changing these settings and studying the results. I was able to stay fairly consistent over most of the work, but I need practice time to understand why, when I wasn't able to reproduced the tac.

                    it wasn't the prettiest repair, gotta start somewhere i suppose lol. it will hold nicely, and it sure is cool to be abke to fix stuff instead of buying something to be the only option of resolve.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by HOBARTxj View Post
                      Up close, and I choose jab with a big stick, a fallen tree maybe, in a thunderstorm with snow. I summon you BEE!
                      Send me a PM with a name and address and I'll send you some instructional/educational materials to help you with learning to fish. As simple as Gas Metal Arc Welding is, squeeze the trigger and squirt metal, it's actually a very deep well to the bottom. Not saying you have to dip that deep to get a drink, but like any pond, some times you have to get past what floats on top to get the good stuff.

                      http://www.esabna.com/euweb/mig_handbook/592mig1_1.htm

                      http://info.esabna.com/rebel-205-holiday-giveaway

                      With the latter link, who knows, you could get lucky. Merry Christmas.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by oldguyfrom56 View Post

                        Send me a PM with a name and address and I'll send you some instructional/educational materials to help you with learning to fish. As simple as Gas Metal Arc Welding is, squeeze the trigger and squirt metal, it's actually a very deep well to the bottom. Not saying you have to dip that deep to get a drink, but like any pond, some times you have to get past what floats on top to get the good stuff.

                        http://www.esabna.com/euweb/mig_handbook/592mig1_1.htm

                        http://info.esabna.com/rebel-205-holiday-giveaway

                        With the latter link, who knows, you could get lucky. Merry Christmas.
                        Yeah I certainly don't expect to learn this overnight, but that's part of what is fun and ecxciting about having the welder now, there's MUCH to learn. One of the the things that has impressed me is that all the experienced folks teaching/ sharing info, are constantly learning and practicing techniqued even 30 years later. There is certainly as much of an art to this as there is a science.

                        thank you sir,

                        Merry Christmas

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by oldguyfrom56 View Post
                          ...Give a man a fish he eats for a day, teach him to fish and he'll never go hungry...
                          For welding, I thought it was: "Build a man a fire, and you warm him for a day; but set a man on fire, and you warm him for the rest of his life."

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            True enough.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              How do you all feel about gel for the nozzel, or even PAM lol, someone recommended it idk.

                              I've been playing around with my settings, trying wire speeds and voltages on 230 andim starting to get a feel for this adjustment. One thing I'm unfamiliar with, but hace regularly noticed it the buildup that the nozel sees overtime.

                              is it fairly common to easily get a good amount of buildup in the nozzle? I find myself noticing after a while, shopping and cleaning it well just to allow the shielding gas to get through cleanly.

                              idk I just haven't heard many speak about this yet

                              also how big a deal is a respirator for mig c25 and mild steel, Not stainless?
                              I don't know anyone that uses one, and I only recently saw someone using this.
                              Last edited by HOBARTxj; 12-24-2018, 02:54 PM.

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