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190 or ? For 1/4",10g, 3/8"

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  • #46
    Originally posted by Dale M. View Post
    Am I the only one seeing OP wants to weld 16 gauge material to 1/4 material?????

    Dale
    OK Dale I have to apologize for my previous post. My cat hopped up on my lap and wouldn't leave me alone because she wanted my full attention. So I misread what was being discussed.

    Still though the 210 MVP is going to be capable of welding 1/4" to 16 ga. As a starting point set the machine to around, or a little less, then were you'd weld 1/8" then direct the arc toward the 1/4" material and gently wash the weld puddle onto the 16 ga material.
    MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
    Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


    PM 180C



    HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

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    • #47
      I am no expert welder but have hacked for many years. When looking for cheap to perform light welding and thick welding you need two machines. The 190 will handle all the light stuff and some thicker stuff but the duty cycle limits on how long you can weld thick stuff. This really will not change unless you spend big dollars for a 250 class machine. The cheap alternative for thick stuff is a cheap stick welder. The stick welder will not weld the thin automotive sheet metal. So I think buy the Hobart 190. Learn how to weld. If you get to really thick stuff buy a buzzbox stick welder. You will be able to handle anything automotive for a hobbyist. with those 2 welders.
      Last edited by coxhaus; 12-11-2018, 11:46 AM.
      Hobart beta-mig 2510 Mig welder
      Victor OA Welding/Cutting Rig
      Century 295 amp Stick welder bought 30+ years ago

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      • #48
        PS
        I would like to add some application. I was a jeeper many years ago in the 1980's. We were out and a Ford truck decided go with us. We told him he was too big but he went any way. The Ford 3/4 truck got stuck behind me. I pulled my front bumper out of the frame trying to winch him up. I repaired my frame using stick with some flat washers reinforcing the frame. It has held to this day. My buddy broke a rear shock mount on his Jeep with big wide 35 inch tires. I welded it back using a 5/32 rod on a stick welder buxxbox wide open. It held for many years until he sold his Jeep.
        Hobart beta-mig 2510 Mig welder
        Victor OA Welding/Cutting Rig
        Century 295 amp Stick welder bought 30+ years ago

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        • #49
          I have purchased the mvp210 and just got the Lincoln 3350 New off a guy on Craigslist.

          largely this 1/4" to 16 gauge is highly irregular outside of my application, however very common for cherokee owners. The frame rails are boxed in with 1/4 to add strength, this requires concentrating heat on the thicker material as to ensure not blowing through the 16 of the body.

          I went with a good machine and dang good hood for many reasons. Cost was **** good on both and I'm still under 1000$, good tools can be resold should I need to sell, good tools do a bit better for newbs like me rather than fighting or needing a lot of experience( this doesn't negate learning), good equipment lasts and thus you get your money out of it as well as a good amount of time learning your craft/machine.
          lol only recently a Lincoln 180C popped up on Craigslist for 450$ a friggin steal that I would have likely gone for had I not already had the 210 in the mail. That and i like the mvp power versatility of the 210.

          I think ive purchased well, not budget gear, not top of the line, but rather reliable and it should perform well.
          I'm looking forward to learning. Now I look for a welding cart, perhaps try my hand at making one if supplies aren't a fortune haha.

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          • #50
            Ive seen some welding on plywood benchs on youtube, at risk of asking a stupid question, how should a 2x12 topped work bench fair if I was to weld upon this vs over the garage floor?

            I thought perhaps I could cap the top off with a good thick piece of sheet metal, though that will likely be very costly for such sized table

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            • #51
              Cheap easy way it protect wood workbench top from weld burns... Go to big box store or lumber yard and get a 3x5 ft piece of cement tile backer board,,,, It's just a few bucks and disposable... Lot cheaper than steel... Be using concept for years.. Just don't hammer on it as it cracks...

              Dale


              Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

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              • #52
                Trouble with either of those is it WILL see impacts, even if not from purposeful hammer blows to your weldment. The backer board will char and be especially brittle and crack there. Wood will burn UNDER the sheet metal, and being softer, will allow the sheet metal to dent right through it. It will look great for a few weeks, depending on how often you use it.

                That said, I've done a lot of work on a thick wood top. I considered it expendable, and it slows you down while trying to make it last longer.

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                • #53
                  I used sheet galvanized metal over a wood work many years ago. I either welded on my vise or used blocks to hold it up off the sheet steel. The sheet steel keeps the splatter ***** from burning into the wood. Heat will go right through to the wood. Be careful.
                  Hobart beta-mig 2510 Mig welder
                  Victor OA Welding/Cutting Rig
                  Century 295 amp Stick welder bought 30+ years ago

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                  • #54
                    Welder arrived yesterday, I haven't had time to set it up yet, however I did pull everything out of the box.

                    I must say at first appearance the build quality for the money seems to be very nice, great paded handle, door hinge, wire feed and cables very stout and look well made. The gun handle is thinner than pictures led me to believe, but that really means nothing for its quality. I've only tinkered with Lincoln's and Forneys, comparatively on looks of build quality alone Hobart has very nice machines.

                    time to get learning

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