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190 or ? For 1/4",10g, 3/8"

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  • 190 or ? For 1/4",10g, 3/8"

    Hi all,

    looking into buying a welder and I came across Hobart 190 which I'm highly considering.

    other options were Lincoln 180C, miller211 that too much$


    I want to weld these gauges for jeep work and would like to know from those that run the 190, Is this machine somnething a newb like me would be happy with, and can it perform for this application?

  • #2
    What application? Feel free to put some details in the question so we can give you a good answer. It's a very capable and user-friendly machine within its limitations.

    Comment


    • #3
      I'll be a home user, for 1/4" to 3/8" jeep axle trusses, bumpers, sliders and the like.

      I've read many Good things on Hobart 190s, and I these are tasks that will be infrequent, yet they need to be solid welds.

      please let me know if I can provide more info, I have c25 shielding gas and want to make a smart purchase for these upgrades.

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      • #4
        Any thoughts, this is a rather quiet forum having gone to this brands forum page?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by HOBARTxj View Post
          Any thoughts, this is a rather quiet forum having gone to this brands forum page?
          Possibly. it's because most of us share Mac702s' view.

          The 190 was developed from several previous models, and each change was an improvement on the original. It should be ideal for your purposes and fuse. The Lincoln is in the same class as far as basic structure and duty cycle and you are paying quite a bit more for the dual voltage and continuous voltage control (neither of these are of great value. unless you need the 110 V). The 211 is actually quite a bit more money, and has only the light weight and some nice-to-have features as a result (actually a different class of welder).

          The Hobart 190 is the best value for your money.

          Comment


          • #6
            The forum is rather quiet because the Hobart IT Personnel in his zeal to stop SPAM issues dropped the latest version of VBulletin on us without tweaking it for optimum use for long time users and many have given up on trying to use site, on flip side, we have one the best tech support persons in Kieth, and a more mature group of users, where the facts/advise prevails, we don't have a lot of "noise" from people (except for me) who think they are welders because they have a HF 100 AMP Fluxcore MIG, managed to glue something together, shoot a video of it, post it up on you tube and become instant expert....

            Suggest you stay, and enjoy some of the best advice (and tolerant users) the you will fim on a welding forum...

            Dale
            Last edited by Dale M.; 09-24-2018, 07:56 PM.
            Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

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            • #7
              I don't plan on leaving, I just wanted to reach out to the knowledgeable on making a good first purchase for my needs.

              I hope I gave enough example of my needs, as mac requested, to get feedback. I'm happy to try and further detail these if need be.

              before October both the Lincoln 180C, Miller 211 will be 1000$ , but if I likely won't see any regret from not spending on them, then the 190 still seems a smart choice.

              I'm happy to listen to all/ any advice. It's my first machine and I want to be smart at making a good purchase.

              thank you to those that have replied. I can't even post to Miller's site to get more opinions on machines.

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              • #8
                I would have thought there would be more reviews/ documented use of this machine, not so much so on the youtube, just some forum posts on tidbits.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by HOBARTxj View Post
                  I would have thought there would be more reviews/ documented use of this machine, not so much so on the youtube, just some forum posts on tidbits.
                  What is it that you need? I used the 190, the linc 180, and some of its predecessors, and other makes. We do not answer questions that aren't asked!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    3/8 Is largely the thickest material if at all that ide ever use this machine for.
                    On the flip side, how will this machine handle 16gauge?
                    does 220 make this machine a bit more brutish on thin material, compared to the 210mvp, or will it handle this just fine?

                    I read mixed things on tapped voltage machines and welding thinner material, does the 190 offer a well enough adjustable voltage tap?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Have you pulled a copy of owner's manual and read through the part about setting for voltages and amperages....

                      https://www.hobartwelders.com/om/6di...60273d_hob.pdf

                      Doing really thin stiff is whole lot different technique that laying a hot bead on 1/4 inch plate.... A lot more welders skills involved

                      Dale
                      Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by HOBARTxj View Post
                        I'll be a home user, for 1/4" to 3/8" jeep axle trusses....
                        This is critical stuff for a new guy with a sub-250A class machine. But the machine will hold its own with any other sub-200A machine out there. I think you just need to get a machine and get to welding.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by HOBARTxj View Post
                          3/8 Is largely the thickest material if at all that ide ever use this machine for.
                          On the flip side, how will this machine handle 16gauge?
                          does 220 make this machine a bit more brutish on thin material, compared to the 210mvp, or will it handle this just fine?

                          I read mixed things on tapped voltage machines and welding thinner material, does the 190 offer a well enough adjustable voltage tap?
                          No, to Quest. 1. Using 220 on dual voltage machines simply means using the full capacity of the machine. Using 110V means top end capacity is reduced.

                          Most experienced MIG welders will tell you that that price difference between continuous voltage and stepped voltage control (about $ 300) is not worth it.
                          In fact, many find that stepped voltage machines like the 190 are easier to set, since you simply choose the range without hunting for it, and use WFS to adjust within that range.

                          You also need to learn that there are 4 factors in adjusting a MIG correctly, not 2, and a good weld requires practice in the two not set on the machine.

                          ( Go to the top of the forum page and do a search on Hobart 190, and you'll find plenty of discussion on tapped vs, CVC),

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Guys I greatly appreciate the feedback, I feel more comfortable that this machine is for me.

                            I am also looking at hoods, please feel free to recommend any and please let me know what you think of the Eastwood 100$ auto as a first hood. I've read I want good, but not too Good as a newb i may melt it up.

                            if it's better to start a new post for a first hood I'll do so.

                            Last edited by HOBARTxj; 09-26-2018, 04:09 AM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by HOBARTxj View Post
                              ... please let me know what you think of the Eastwood 100$ auto as a first hood. I've read I want good, but not too Good as a newb i may melt it up...
                              I've never heard that advice before. I've also never used a cheaper hood before, so I can't comment on how well they work or how long they last. I was quite happy to spend $250+ for one of the best hoods on the market at the time. This means I have a Jackson EQC Executive that is well over ten years old and still works great with just new headgear, and I also have a Miller Big Window Elite that I bought only a few years later to replace the Jackson (while having a spare hood) but the Jackson just won't die. Both hoods are still going strong but batteries last a lot longer in the old Jackson. So make sure you amortize the cost of ownership over the life of the product. These are probably some of the cheapest hoods out there when you look at it that way.

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