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Hobart 190 handler

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  • #16
    Check the voltage at the potentiometer. It should vary from approximately 0-20Vdc from the center to each outside post when the trigger is pulled.

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    • #17
      So I called hobart certified dealer

      He said the wire feed speed is directly related to the tap settings and the lower taps are very little variation in visible speed, so I tried it ( not welding yet) and there is much more variation in speed in the higher tap settings

      He said try it out and if not operating properly it will either not keep up or put out way too much wire and be a mess

      One of my first projects is welding up some peices for my new maple syrup evaporator ( 16 gauge) with some heavier gauge angle iron.

      With different gauge steel s being welded together is it best to start a test weld settings for lighter gauge peice or heavier gauge?

      My thought is to practice on some similar gauge stuff and just see how it goes ( I need to make some aulterations to a steel cart to hold welder at an upward angle like store bought ones)

      While I had Hobart rep on phone I asked where to run gas to start( he said in a building, no wind-15/20?)

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      • #18
        As for gas 15-20 CFH is about right.... Welding thick material to thin material you want to concentrate the heat on the thick and wash the arc over on thin just enough to get a "bond" (penetration), hesitate on thin to long and you will blow a hole in it.... How heavy is angle iron?

        Dale
        Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

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        • #19
          1/8" thick I believe is some leftover stuff I have I was thinking about using

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Hunt4weld View Post
            ...He said the wire feed speed is directly related to the tap settings and the lower taps are very little variation in visible speed, so I tried it ( not welding yet) and there is much more variation in speed in the higher tap settings...
            Interesting, I'd have thought it would still be quite noticeable, especially in sound. But the fact that it has a difference is a very good sign. Put a radius line on the drive roll and it might be easier to see it change speed.

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            • #21
              I sort of did my own test on it after I spoke with the Hobart rep yesterday

              I held the gun on a benchtop and pulled the trigger and counted seconds off till it hit the ground. there's a difference in seconds before wire hit the concrete floor , so I guess all I can do is assume that it is working properly and give it a try and see what happens

              If I bought it brand-new I would not have even questioned any of it but , that was the excuse that was on the tag from first owner returning it. I thought I better check it out before I tried to use it and aggravate myself if it was malfunctioning with the wire feed speed.

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              • #22
                If I were going to install a new 50 amp circuit for a welder, I'd run 8 or even 6 gauge copper wire. My reading of the 2014 National Electrical Code indicates that welding machines do not get a pass on wire size any more. AND if you're going to run lighter wire and depend on the duty cycle of the welding machine for protection, there should not be a plug and receptacle in the circuit; the machine should be directly wired.
                "If a problem can't be solved, enlarge it." (The 34th president of the United States)

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by ~0le View Post
                  If I were going to install a new 50 amp circuit for a welder, I'd run 8 or even 6 gauge copper wire. My reading of the 2014 National Electrical Code indicates that welding machines do not get a pass on wire size any more. AND if you're going to run lighter wire and depend on the duty cycle of the welding machine for protection, there should not be a plug and receptacle in the circuit; the machine should be directly wired.
                  Your reading of the National Electrical Code is wrong. What makes you think that part has been changed? Are you reading Article 630?

                  That said, there's certainly nothing wrong with heavier wire for greater flexibility, especially in an environment where you can't control what gets plugged into your 50A receptacle.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by ~0le View Post
                    If I were going to install a new 50 amp circuit for a welder, I'd run 8 or even 6 gauge copper wire. My reading of the 2014 National Electrical Code indicates that welding machines do not get a pass on wire size any more. AND if you're going to run lighter wire and depend on the duty cycle of the welding machine for protection, there should not be a plug and receptacle in the circuit; the machine should be directly wired.
                    If that were case no welding machine would come with plugs on them.... Beside the breaker amperage and wire size is to protect the wiring not the machine (sized accordingly) ...I believe you are in wrong part of Code...

                    Dale
                    Last edited by Dale M.; 04-21-2018, 09:40 PM.
                    Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

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                    • #25
                      Yep. You guys are right. I was wrong. I'll turn and go quietly. ~0le
                      "If a problem can't be solved, enlarge it." (The 34th president of the United States)

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                      • #26
                        Took to Hobart certified dealer after doing some test welds that were terrible welds

                        Wire plug connector was totally disconnected, easy fix and was under warranty ( now to hook gas back up and retest some welds...)

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Hunt4weld View Post
                          Took to Hobart certified dealer after doing some test welds that were terrible welds

                          Wire plug connector was totally disconnected, easy fix and was under warranty ( now to hook gas back up and retest some welds...)
                          Umm,,, What "wire plug"....

                          Dale
                          Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

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                          • #28
                            Hobart guy said it was a wire connection that was not latched and not connected to the wire feed speed pot switch

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                            • #29
                              I just bought a 190 from Tractor Supply almost exact same time frame ?. Out of the box wire feed problems. Did timed wire feeds with different settings: 30 vs 60. Minimal difference in wire fed.

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                              • #30
                                The service dealer I took it to didn't even charge me anything to fix it

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