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Hobart 140, can I actually get full amperage off 20A circuit?

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  • Hobart 140, can I actually get full amperage off 20A circuit?

    I just got my Hobart 140 yesterday, and the manual shows it just needs a 20A circuit. But when I was researching which welder to get I read some topics about needing a 30A circuit to get 140 amp, and a 20A circuit was only capable of 90 or 100A? Or maybe that was just for a Lincoln welder, and the Hobart is optimized to run off a 20A? If I need to swap a breaker or if it helps run the welder cooler I should be able to in my garage.

    THanks

  • #2
    I recommend the 30A breaker. You'll be much better off.

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    • #3
      Probably not going to work on top setting with 20 amp breaker... All out on top setting it draws pretty close to 24 amps... I had to put in a dedicated 30 amp breaker for welder circuit....

      Dale
      Last edited by Dale M.; 03-15-2018, 06:08 PM.
      Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

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      • #4
        Ok thanks both! I’ll find a 30a for my panel and pop it in before I start welding anything thicker. Just practicing/getting used to it for now. This was an upgrade from my POS harbor freight welder. Thanks!

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        • #5
          Just to put it out there, you should only put in a 30A breaker if the circuit is dedicated only to the welding machine (assuming not on #10 wire).

          Otherwise, you risk longer duty cycle load(s) pulling 30A continuously on your 20A wiring.

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          • #6
            Yeah.... 10 gauge wire and dedicated plug for 30 A circuit.... House wiring can be as little as 14 gauge on receptacles, believe later code is 12 gauge, but 10 gauge is safest... Though I do use a 25 foot 12 gauge extension cord but its all out in open and visible if there is problem....

            Dale
            Last edited by Dale M.; 03-16-2018, 09:56 AM.
            Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Dale M. View Post
              Yeah.... 10 gauge wire and dedicated plug for 30 A circuit....
              If dedicated to welding machine only, it can be a 30A breaker on the 14-ga wire, though it's not much more expensive to just make it for all loads if running new wire. But if dealing with existing wiring, sometimes you do what you have to do to make it work.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by MAC702 View Post

                If dedicated to welding machine only, it can be a 30A breaker on the 14-ga wire, though it's not much more expensive to just make it for all loads if running new wire. But if dealing with existing wiring, sometimes you do what you have to do to make it work.
                Ok, interesting. So what I was going to do previously, was get a 220V machine. I currently have a quad breaker for 220 installed for a Spa I used to have. I no longer have the spa. My panel is on the outside wall of the garage, just on the other side of the wall from where my workbench was, so was just going to run some of the wire through the wall for a 220 outlet in the garage. But for portability reasons decided to get a 110 machine(need to fix various things at parents' house as well, ride on lawnmowers etc). I do still have one spare blank in my panel, so I could pop a 30A in there, disconnect the spa wire, and use the spa wire(don't remember gauge offhand but it ran my spa that was probably 50ish ft) to run into the garage and have a dedicated circuit at home by my workbench. Because I will need to run an extension cord from there to the street when working on my travel trailer, I MIGHT be able to get to the back of it with a 25ft extension. Thanks!

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                • #9
                  Section 5-8 (page 14) of owners manual states you can go 50 ft with 12 gauge extension cord or 100 feet with 10 gauge extension cord... Would be really good idea to have wire from breaker to receptical same gauge as extension cord depending on what you decide to go with....

                  https://www.hobartwelders.com/om/6di...58267e_hob.pdf

                  Dale
                  Last edited by Dale M.; 03-16-2018, 10:17 PM.
                  Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Keep in mind most of the ratings for U.S. based companies are designed around 115/230 VAC input. Luckily for many of us our local power now runs around 120/240 VAC which will change things slightly. Maybe even in the 122/244 range depending on season and time of day. Get familiar with your local voltage range by measuring an outlet every now and then.

                    So the question "can I get full power out of my ABC123 machine on a 20 amp/50 amp circuit" may be skewed right off the get-go. A lot of other variables come into play too. Length of the pre-existing wire run is a big factor. What may look like a 40 foot run might easily be 60 or 70 foot run by the time you factor in all up-over-down-up non lineal sections most wire runs go through to the end point. About all you can get out of an internet answer is a likely hood of the possibility. ..

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