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HH190 basic use questions

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  • HH190 basic use questions

    Hello, I am looking at buying a new welder and I like the 190. I mainly do autobody and some chassis work. Nothing to big. I currently use an old Lincoln sp100 and I like it although it's kind of old.

    My main concern about the Hobart units was not having an infinite/continuous voltage setting. I'm worried if I'm doing a panel repair, that if the voltage is to hot and I go down a setting, it will then not be hot enough.

    Any insight or help/advice would be great. Thanks
    Btw, the name is a joke, I have a sense of humor

  • #2
    Our member "Dan" here could probably give you a good opinion. I believe he did some evaluation on the 190 or it's near-identical predecessor, the 187.

    The 190 does have a 7-position voltage switch, more than most in this class of welder.
    --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

    Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
    -------------------------

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    • #3
      I think I recall from some analysis by Dan, Scot, or others, that the 187/190 click settings still gave a near complete range, with some adjustment of w.f.s. and stick-out, making a continuous range control unnecessary. I don't recall any complaints from owners that these machines needed a continuous voltage control, along with the $2-300.00 additional cost, and more complex setting issues. I have an old Lincoln SP 125 Plus and find the continuous range control largely unnecessary.
      Last edited by Northweldor; 08-26-2015, 06:37 AM.

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      • #4
        Welcome to the forum.
        Lincoln A/C 225
        Everlast PA 200

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        • #5
          Thanks for the replys. I actually found the infinite adjustment very useful. I didn't have to stop to change wire because it was either hot or cold.

          I'm kind of torn now between the 190 and 210. It seems the 190 has more adjustments as the 210 only works in certain voltage numbers for either 220 or 115v. Although I could be wrong, it didn't say you have full voltage use in both input settings.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by richard_head View Post
            Thanks for the replys. I actually found the infinite adjustment very useful. I didn't have to stop to change wire because it was either hot or cold.

            I'm kind of torn now between the 190 and 210. It seems the 190 has more adjustments as the 210 only works in certain voltage numbers for either 220 or 115v. Although I could be wrong, it didn't say you have full voltage use in both input settings.
            Believe the 210MVP only has the 5 (?) Low settings when operating in120 volts..... Look at manual for 210MVP for heat ranges when on 120 volts...

            210MVP on 120 volts is equivalant to HH 140....

            Dale
            Last edited by Dale M.; 08-26-2015, 02:11 PM.
            Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Dale M. View Post
              Believe the 210MVP only has the 5 (?) Low settings when operating in120 volts..... Look at manual for 210MVP for heat ranges when on 120 volts...

              210MVP on 120 volts is equivalant to HH 140....

              Dale
              Ah just saw that! Thank you!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by richard_head View Post
                Thanks for the replys. I actually found the infinite adjustment very useful. I didn't have to stop to change wire because it was either hot or cold.

                I'm kind of torn now between the 190 and 210. It seems the 190 has more adjustments as the 210 only works in certain voltage numbers for either 220 or 115v. Although I could be wrong, it didn't say you have full voltage use in both input settings.
                Wire size should be chosen for the thickness of the metal you are welding, and the capacity of the machine, rather than to adjust heat (amperage). Then, voltage is generally set and wire-feed and stick-out are varied to obtain heat (amperage) settings.

                I didn't say the continuous control was useless, but questioned the cost-benefit with respect to the 190.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Northweldor View Post
                  Wire size should be chosen for the thickness of the metal you are welding, and the capacity of the machine, rather than to adjust heat (amperage). Then, voltage is generally set and wire-feed and stick-out are varied to obtain heat (amperage) settings.

                  I didn't say the continuous control was useless, but questioned the cost-benefit with respect to the 190.
                  Makes sense, I think either way I'll be ok. I'm going to just grab the 210. Local TSC has it for $750

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                  • #10
                    7 taps should be a breeze to work with

                    7 taps on a machine with this low of output should be easy to work with. Before Miller pushed infinite voltage they had the 4 tap units. Even had the 172 challenger. That was the pits as the taps were really far apart. One beauty of a tap machine is wider sweet spot and often a softer arc. Trust me, Until very recently many infinite voltage machines had a harsh arc and it seemed like wire speed was always too low or too high. Not so with a tap machine. I have the Hobart 210 with 7 taps. For hobby use, if I had to do things again I might have gone with a 190 for a portable machine as I have a stick machine for heavier work. .
                    fence and gate shop worker
                    At home...
                    Lincoln Power MIG 180....
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